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Nail in petrified wood


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Okay I was walking on the river bar and came across this awesome petrified wood and upon closer inspection it has a piece of a small finishing nail running through it, I mean you can see where it has come through the back of the wood stone and rusted and became petrified with the wood and it was hammered into the wood at an angle does not just piece wood straight down but at a 30degree angle how bizarre, let me know what you think

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Yep. A prehistoric pareidolia nail. They are pretty common. I think the metal used for these nails was unobtanium.

Or it could just be a petrified worm hole.

Why do you think this is petrified wood?

Edited by clay
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If you toss it in the fire and it burns, its certainly not petrified wood.  I guess it could have been coal though.

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I already own several famous bridges.

My backyard would be overflowing but I can't seem to find anyone who will deliver to Arizona.

Still I could probably fit another one in next to my giant Martian meteorite collection.  Whatcha got? :4chsmu1:

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And for the future I'd like seriousness about my post why don't you two have fun building a bridge to nowhere with ex senator the late Ted Stevens because what a waste of time do you two just sit around and have your pastime cracking rude nothing to do with anything comments on other people's post?

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But I don't have access to a metal detector at the moment but for anyone with knowledge on minerals and fossils what happens to metal if it becomes fossilized is it possible and would it still be metal and magnetic or would the mineral process change the composition to something different and someone said it could be a fossilized worm whole were you joking or being for real would the whole just be there instead and of filled in like it is?

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21 minutes ago, obieblue said:

But I don't have access to a metal detector at the moment but for anyone with knowledge on minerals and fossils what happens to metal if it becomes fossilized is it possible and would it still be metal and magnetic or would the mineral process change the composition to something different and someone said it could be a fossilized worm whole were you joking or being for real would the whole just be there instead and of filled in like it is?

Anything that is fossilized is much older than refined metal, A.K.A. in this case iron, steel, etc., what you're seeing in the specimen couldn't possibly be refine metal.

The above is the reason is why other members are having a bit of fun in this topic, they mean you no harm or ill will.

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11 hours ago, obieblue said:

But I don't have access to a metal detector at the moment but for anyone with knowledge on minerals and fossils what happens to metal if it becomes fossilized is it possible and would it still be metal and magnetic or would the mineral process change the composition to something different and someone said it could be a fossilized worm whole were you joking or being for real would the whole just be there instead and of filled in like it is?

Any piece of petrified wood is simply too old to have a nail in it. As mentioned by Au Seeker, very few metals actually appear in their pure form in nature. The only way you could have metallic iron in a piece of petrified wood is if a tree grew around an iron meteorite. But even then, all the iron would have long rusted away before you found it.

As to the worm hole comment, yes, that is a real thing, and is most likely what you’ve got there. It is not at all uncommon for petrified wood to show damage from insects or other animals from when the tree was alive. The rock pictured below is a Type of petrified wood from Australia. It is commonly referred to as “peanut wood.” The white areas are thought to be boreholes made by clams. 9D5B573C-2672-4DD8-BB5B-8B2C64C881EB.jpeg

For more information, you can read about peanut wood here: https://geology.com/gemstones/peanut-wood/

Edited by d_day
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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

I don't see any evidence in the pictures that it is petrified wood. Even petrified wood fragments show end grain patterns. The erosion patterns on the surface are unusual for petrified wood.

If I had to pick a story I'd say it looks to me like like a weathered metamorphic with a sandstone or possibly mudstone origin. Worm holes are common in that type of stone. To me it's just another interesting piece of Chalcedony that looks kinda like wood - until I hear a better story.

:4chsmu1:

Edited by clay
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On the serious note then, you do not have a piece of petrified wood, much less one with a nail in it.  What you have is a piece of cross-bedded sandstone or siltstone that has been worn smooth and round by the action of it tumbling in the river.

I thought the note about a petrified woodpecker was just brilliant.  Had me rolling in the floor!

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