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An old truck hub and an axle works good to crush it down to pea sized gravel. Then use a hammer and chisel to pulverize it. 

I used a digging bar with a post hole tamper on one end for years. It worked sweet. You could shatter the rock with the chisel end and smash it up with the tamper. If you pace yourself you can crush ore for a couple hours and get a gold pan full.

I don't worry about getting it down to powder. If it goes through a window screen you are going to be able to see most of the gold. If you are getting good gold then you can refine your process as needed. 

Crushing is not too bad after you get the hang of it. I can crush and concentrate a couple buckets of ore in an afternoon.

It's not like running placer gravel. A couple of buckets of good ore will yield quite a little pile of gold.

You can do a lot better in a day crushing ore than sweeping bedrock once you figure out what the ore looks like. Most guys get frustrated pretty quick. But if you keep at it you can build up the gold fast.

It takes a lot of water to process two buckets of crushed ore compared to two buckets of gravel. The crushing is not much harder than digging a trench but it isn't fun.

Most guys don't stay at it long enough to have much success. But you can recover some mighty pretty gold from hard rock ore if you stay with it for a few weekends. 

In my area there is only a couple spots worth detecting. And a hand full worth running a drywasher. But there are hundreds of opportunities to work rich hard rock tailings and float. So it can be a great way to prospect if you are in a good hard rock area.

 

 

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On 1/12/2022 at 3:09 PM, Tbutch said:

That’s interesting you have a well on a ridge at 2,000’. We live on a Mesa above 7,000’. Nobody has wells in our area. 

That’s really amazing you are so close to the gold discovery. I’m going to do more research of our area. I have no idea what the mesh would be here. How do you Cush to a certain mesh size?
 

Jaw crusher and impact mill. Mesh screen the material.

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On 1/12/2022 at 5:59 PM, Bedrock Bob said:

An old truck hub and an axle works good to crush it down to pea sized gravel. Then use a hammer and chisel to pulverize it. 

I used a digging bar with a post hole tamper on one end for years. It worked sweet. You could shatter the rock with the chisel end and smash it up with the tamper. If you pace yourself you can crush ore for a couple hours and get a gold pan full.

I don't worry about getting it down to powder. If it goes through a window screen you are going to be able to see most of the gold. If you are getting good gold then you can refine your process as needed. 

Crushing is not too bad after you get the hang of it. I can crush and concentrate a couple buckets of ore in an afternoon.

It's not like running placer gravel. A couple of buckets of good ore will yield quite a little pile of gold.

You can do a lot better in a day crushing ore than sweeping bedrock once you figure out what the ore looks like. Most guys get frustrated pretty quick. But if you keep at it you can build up the gold fast.

It takes a lot of water to process two buckets of crushed ore compared to two buckets of gravel. The crushing is not much harder than digging a trench but it isn't fun.

Most guys don't stay at it long enough to have much success. But you can recover some mighty pretty gold from hard rock ore if you stay with it for a few weekends. 

In my area there is only a couple spots worth detecting. And a hand full worth running a drywasher. But there are hundreds of opportunities to work rich hard rock tailings and float. So it can be a great way to prospect if you are in a good hard rock area.

 

 

Great info. The hub and axle sounds like a good idea. Is this worth crushing? Lots of iron pyrite. I can’t tell if there is any gold. 

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Unless you can see visible gold you just can't tell if it is worth crushing. 

Just like you can't tell good gravel without panning it 

Gold can be in pyrite like that. It is often not "free gold" (native metallic gold) but rather in chemical combination with copper and sulfur. 

Beat some down to dust and test it!

In my limited experience where pyrite dominates free gold is absent. But that means exactly sh!t outside my little area. In your area it may be rich. 

You are looking at the right stuff. You are identifying mineralized float. And your area obviously has polymetallic ore present. So you should be able to recover some gold if you do a bit of research.

No doubt there are metals mines in your area. It's just a matter of learning where they were and what kind of rock they were working in.

You can generally get production records and detailed descriptions of just about any hole that produced a dimes worth of metal. Here it is the Bureau of Mines (A state agency n conjunction with a State University). 

Im not sure where the records are where you are at but I bet there is a similar agency that handles that. 

Engineers love detailed records and data. So it will be no problem getting detailed descriptions. You can generally take that knowledge into the field and come home with gold.

It really is just that simple. 

Now, making a profit at it is something else all together. But recovering hard rock specimens on a hobby or collector level is a realistic undertaking. It looks like you are in a good area to be successful.

Even if there is no gold in it I would bet the pyrite specimen carried silver. Just a hunch. It looks just like ore we used to cut from a vein that carried over 300 oz. per ton. It was black gold. Smelled like firecrackers.

That type of ore is usually all sorts of metals and combinations thereof. It was all in a hot sulfuric acid slime and crystallized as it lost pressure (depth). It is usually copper, silver, zinc, molybdenum, manganese, iron, lead and whatever else mother nature was puking up that day.

Some of those specimens have rare minerals and sell for big bucks even if they aren't worth smelting. So don't pass over ore just because it does not carry gold. Try to figure out what it IS rather than throw it away for what it's not. Sometimes you would be surprised.

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