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Buckolith? Deer egg?


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My son shot a nice little buck yesterday. 

This was inside...

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It's heavy and hard. It feels like sandstone to me.

My son said that none of the gutsack was punctured. It may have come out of the esophagus when it was cut.

It's pretty big for a deer to swallow. It is a rock that has been worn into a perfect shape inside the deer's giblets somewhere. Either that or it is a calcification the deer's body made.

Has anyone seen a rock that came out of a deer? Would you call it a gastrolith?

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1 hour ago, Beeper Bob said:

I have seen them from dinosaur stomachs. Your right they are called gastroliths, have some from Utah. May be a deer also uses them to help grind their food. Never really cut open the stomachs of the deer I have cleaned,

As I posted it wasn't in the stomach. It must have been in his esophagus or trachea. I guess they can form in a bunch of places besides the gut.

It looks and feels like a rock. But they are lumps of calcified something or the other. I guess they form around an object kinda like a sceptarian nodule.

You would almost bet it was gastrointestinal. A rock that had been swallowed. But my son found it in the chest cavity. The gut bag wasnt punctured. If it came out of the gastrointestinal tract it was up in his throat when he cut the esophagus.

It's a bezoar stone for sure. It's got a silky almost fibrous texture to it. The strangest thing I have ever seen.

I bet it is one in a million. I had no idea. I knew fish had otoliths in their "ears" and have found them. But I never dreamed of finding a rock in a deer.

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I bet it was a gallstone. I have been reading up on "madstones" and they are both in the gut and under the lobes of the liver. This pretty much explains how it got up in the chest cavity without puncturing a gut. 

I read these things used to fetch 10x their weight in gold. They were the "cure" for rabies. People would travel across the country to someone who had a madstone to be cured. Hunters used to always look for them when they killed a deer. 

A guy just found one in a pig in China. They estimate the value at $600k. A freaking gallstone from a Chinese farm pig.

https://nextshark.com/chinese-farmer-finds-pig-gallstone-worth-605000/

I figure a madstone from a mule deer buck shot in the Black Range by a young man on foot a couple miles from the truck must be worth upwards of a million bucks. Maybe more! 

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Showed this to a nurse practitioner who said it was the color of a gall stone and would be located above the stomach.  Also said that a stone that size would have been located in some sort of tissue sack.  Perhaps if your son finds some unusual growth when cleaning, that’s where it came from.

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36 minutes ago, chrisski said:

Showed this to a nurse practitioner who said it was the color of a gall stone and would be located above the stomach.  Also said that a stone that size would have been located in some sort of tissue sack.  Perhaps if your son finds some unusual growth when cleaning, that’s where it came from.

It came from his innards and all that is still laying in the field. 

He had a long pack out and didn't bring the heart, liver or kidneys like we usually do. So there is nothing to look at but meat.

I'm thinking about going back up to the kill site and digging through the gut pile. It could be a bezoar bonanza!

 

 

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That was an interesting find for sure.  But I'd think that the yoties are having a picnic up there Bob, better go tonight!

While doing paleo-monitoring at a construction site,  I once found some polished rocks in a 30 myo marine massive siltstone formation, and there were fossilized baleen whale bones nearby including parts of a skull.  Some whales scrape the ocean bottom with their mouths for crustaceans and such, and get stones stuck in their jaws that grind together and form polished rocks.  At first I thought maybe that was a gastrolith as well, but you may have a golden deer egg there after all.  

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