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Black carbanodo?


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On 8/22/2021 at 9:21 AM, Sketch said:

I did but it was not showing any streak.

Quiz:What color will it streak if it is black diamond?

 

I wonder if a diamond knife honing plate could be used to id the streak, in the off chance that it is carbonado...

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2 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

It obviously a "carbanodo".

:rolleyes:

:)Bah, Bob you jump to conclusions too easy and go with "consensus" only to be proven wrong later.

Sketch, I do believe that Mr Bob is blowing sunshine where none was before.

See if you can carve some gouges :Diggin_a_hole:out of the back of a toilet tank lid with your rock.  If you can, well then ,Bob's yer uncle.

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1 hour ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

:)Bah, Bob you jump to conclusions too easy and go with "consensus" only to be proven wrong later.

Sketch, I do believe that Mr Bob is blowing sunshine where none was before.

See if you can carve some gouges :Diggin_a_hole:out of the back of a toilet tank lid with your rock.  If you can, well then ,Bob's yer uncle.

Carbanodo's are the softer, more basaltic version of a carbonado. 

You really need to spend some time learning basic mineral ID Stillheaving Whalebelly. 

Both carbonado and carbanodo leave a colorless streak on a jasper that kinda sorta looks like a tooth.

The only way that you can tell the difference is to crush them into a fine powder and mix them with your seaweed smoothie. If it gives you immunity to every disease you will never have it is probably a basalt from extreme depth with a lot of iron and silica.

Or you can claw at your toilet with it and try to divine some insight by peering at the underside of the tank lid and listening to the Beatles white album backwards while on mushrooms. 

Either way it is basalt of some kind. Probably basanite. It looks kinda olivineey on that one end. 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Carbanodo's are the softer, more basaltic version of a carbonado. 

You really need to spend some time learning basic mineral ID Stillheaving Whalebelly. 

Both carbonado and carbanodo leave a colorless streak...

 

Either way it is basalt of some kind. Probably basanite. It looks kinda olivineey on that one end. 

 

 

Ah, I missed the finer points of carbanodo  ID.   BUT ... ARE you sure streak is colorless? Not white?

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Here is a pretty good rundown on doing a proper streak test.

https://geology.com/minerals/streak-test.shtml

It is worth mentioning that not everyone uses an unglazed porcelain streak plate. 

Some use silicon carbide abrasive. This is great for minerals like hematite and magnetite. Harder minerals like carbonados and carbanodos will not streak with silicon carbide abrasives. 

I often use a ceramic tile. I am assuming that some ceramic is harder than porcelain. And I know all toilet tank lids were not created equal. So hard minerals may be a bit tricky.

I don't streak many carbanodos. I generally use them for slingshot ammo. I don't know how they streak. But I can tell you they have excellent penetration.

I have seen carbonado from a Kimberlite pipe just north of where I live. They looked like translucent black sand to the naked eye. They weren't attached to a rock. They were recovered from sand using a suction jig in a cone bottom tank and trapped in grease on a table. 

I didn't try to streak one. They were about the size of fly specks. I believe they were carbonado because a guy with a suction jig on the side of his truck told me they were. He could have been lying and I wouldn't have known the difference. 

Im not really into streaking stones any more. I did it often it in my younger years. It seemed like I was always rubbing my stones against something.

I would do it again if I found a rock that I thought needed streaking. But it seems the older you get the less you are inclined to streak. 

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How about some  provenience?  Where did the sample come from, who collected it, or was it bought at a shop?

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 Kimberlite is not the same rock type as a Lamproites; different geneses, and depth of fluid origin.

I can see this sample being a weathered lamproite.  I would not rule out a weathered massive sulphide ore either. 

We defiantly need a streak test of an unweather surface of the sample on an unglazed, porcelain, plate.

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