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This has to be not from earth


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My first impression when I found this rock was burnt petrified fiberglass. Yeah.  It's hard to catch in pictures but it has a super unique texture and look to it that says I'm to weird to be anything but a meteorite.  The streak is from none to light gray and weighs 7 ish grams but haven't done density test.  Can't bear to accept a meteor wrong so instead my question is where did this one originate?  Also it scratches glass with ease and it almost LOOKS fibrous but it isn't... I know.        Non magnetic

 

 

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I agree with all of the above comments. Good rock hunting, but not a meteorite (with near certainty). 

Good photos, and an interesting rock though. It looks like a mixture of quartzite and some other material that

is likely silica as well.

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Every rock that makes its way from outer space down thru earth's atmosphere is going to have indications of that violent passage on it.  It may take looking close with magnification but tell-tale signs will be there.  Close examination will uncover indicators like flow lines and/or crust whether it be primary fusion crust formed early in the passage or a lighter thinner type of crust formed later after disruption.  There can also be cases of melting and flowing, redepositing of material.  Also regmaglypts, thumbprint like excavations caused by ablation.  Some are easily identified, others take a little studying.  Then there can be cracking of the crust or partial fracturing of the stone.  These two are pretty common features and not hard to see in most cases.  All meteorites have made the trip thru the atmosphere.  I highly suggest studying these features and then when you find a suspect stone, look for those tell-tale signs.  Magnets will attract some but not all stony meteorites and then the attraction or magnetic susceptibility can vary greatly with different types of meteorites.  I hunt with my eyes, a metal detector, and I use a magnet rake but when I study possibles that I come across, I still look for the regmaglypts, crust, flow lines, fracturing, and so on.

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