Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

This old Ghost town


Guest

Recommended Posts

This Old ghost town for the  win ,

Alex.

...

The answer is: Oh. IT'S  A DAILY DOUBLE:tisk-tisk::pop:

At  well over a mile in elev. this  old ghost town, produced   mass quantities of  Ag and Pb, with minor  levels of Cu and Zn. You see, they had a few mines in their backpocket, ahem.

Anyway, the ore from the mines of this old town helped to grow the city of Los Angeles, back in the day.  It is not operational, now.

And the mines  are not functional , either. 

Name that ghost town. 

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The California Rand Silver mines produced more than 7 million dollars in silver at 65 cents an ounce in the 1920's. The deposit was so rich no development work was needed to get at the ore; they just scooped it out. After two months $1,770,000 worth of ore had been extracted and the mine was still just a hole 50 feet deep, with no waste dump.

The town name is Atolia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, clay said:

 

The town name is Atolia.

 

5 hours ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

 

At  well over a mile in elev.  ,this  old

Closest town to it might be confused with some cookie bakers....getting warmer.

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know he's asking about fat hill. The problem is fat hill doesn't really fit the part of the riddle "the ore from the mines of this old town helped to grow the city of Los Angeles, back in the day".

At the time they were mining fat hill Los Angles was known as the "queen of cow towns" and had a population of less than 7 thousand people (there were a lot more cows). Fat hill had it's own smelters and only used the port of Los Angles to ship the lead, zinc and silver bars they had extracted. Other than a few more wagons a month rolling through town I doubt Los Angles even noticed the fat hill operation. Los Angles and Santa Monica were all about growing and shipping beef to the gold mines back then.

So which do you go with? Atolia which produced more silver than fat hill and was near the end of the 20th century California desert mining boom (not high enough) or fat hill - not much effect on L.A. being so early but well over a mile in elevation.

You can visit fat hill for $10. You can visit Atolia by just pulling over as you drive through on your way to Randsburg.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, pairadiceau said:

Cookie bakers....

Bakersfield?  Lotsa cookies here....

Cerro Gordo?  Caved in workings.  250 miles to the north of Los Angeles.  Elevation: 8,500'

 

Well, they're  elves, really the Keebler elves...similar name to a town on the edge of a, now, salt lake( Owens).. the booming metroplex of Keeler. 8 miles or so  and up a mile more is Cerro Gordo @8500'... Presently being rebuilt on youtube.

Crazy fun to watch. Logistics  nightmare.

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, clay said:

I know he's asking about fat hill. The problem is fat hill doesn't really fit the part of the riddle "the ore from the mines of this old town helped to grow the city of Los Angeles, back in the day".

At the time they were mining fat hill Los Angles was known as the "queen of cow towns" and had a population of less than 7 thousand people (there were a lot more cows). Fat hill had it's own smelters and only used the port of Los Angles to ship the lead, zinc and silver bars they had extracted. Other than a few more wagons a month rolling through town I doubt Los Angles even noticed the fat hill operation. Los Angles and Santa Monica were all about growing and shipping beef to the gold mines back then.

So which do you go with? Atolia which produced more silver than fat hill and was near the end of the 20th century California desert mining boom (not high enough) or fat hill - not much effect on L.A. being so early but well over a mile in elevation.

You can visit fat hill for $10. You can visit Atolia by just pulling over as you drive through on your way to Randsburg.

Fat Hill, I guess, is the translation  of "Cerro Gordo"- name the early Spanish in the valley gave the mtn. 

It was definately  an early player to help build wealth  in LA.  As usual, water(lack of) ,weather  and elevation made things difficult.

May be I exaggerated,  a bit,,,  like that never happened before:Diggin_a_hole:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cerro Gordo is an amazing example of what determined people can do if the face of much adversity, I visited there a couple of years ago and met the caretaker who gave us a bit of a tour.  He is a great guy with a lifetime of hard rock mining experience, he is a licensed blaster and is from Nevada.  The hotel which is currently being rebuilt as you mentioned was in very good condition and was a wonderful example of the architecture and furnishings of the past.  At that time the young man who is the present owner was just getting his feet wet so to speak and sadly the fire happened a year or two after that.

Thanks for the history lesson Barry!

Those guys from Utah make a great team.

Quit exagerrateinngg!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, pairadiceau said:

Cerro Gordo is an..

 

Those guys from Utah make a great team.

Quit exagerrateinngg!

:):inocent::barnie:Dad blame .it, confangled whatitz. Son of a sonnyjim. IZA swore we pullt oot milluns!:cowboypistol::4chsmu1:

16 millun!

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...