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Hey guys,

 

I had some incredible beginners luck when metal detecting in the surf here in Florida for the first time and found what I believe to be a meteorite. I'm sure you all have lots of BS rocks on here but this in particular has a fusion crust, and is highly metallic. It was found in salt water and does not appear to have any signs of Iron oxide or corrosion. Shame, but I accidentally dropped the meteorite, exposing a crystalline shaped metal inclusion. It is quite dense, at 12.5g and about the size of a small grape. Its got a little white shell stuck in a crack I have yet to try to release. It does not respond to any magnet I have, but I need to find something larger than a fridge magnet or drawer magnet to be 100%. Please see attached photos of the meteorite and tell me what you think!

 

I met one self described meteor collector who said I might have found a very rare type of meteorite because it is non magnetic and has the metal inclusion.

Does this type of meteorite have a name or classification? What do you guys think the metal is? Worthless or rare, either way I'm very proud to have my first bit of the external universe in my possessions. There is a Thermo Scientific analyzer gun at a jewelry dealer near me I'm going to have shot at the exposed metal, I'll come back with the results once I get them, maybe they will help in the identification.

 

Cheers!

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Cheers!

 

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This type of meteorite does have a classification. It is called a meteorwrong.

It is a non ferrous metal. The "Thermo scientific analyzer gun" is going to tell you it is lead.

 

Sorry man. It's not a meteorite.

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Why would a meteorite be covered in a ceramic like crust?

It does not look anything like a meteorite either. And it is not magnetic. If it is indeed metal it is non ferrous. So it is an artifact of some sort.

 

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I'm interested in the story about the coin behind the rock.  Seems like a silver dollar of some kind, but beyond that, I'm not sure.

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On 4/8/2021 at 7:03 AM, wkvisual said:

this in particular has a fusion crust

wk,

Have you held a meteorite with a fusion crust?  Fusion crust looks quite different than the piece you have shown here.  It would not cover an entire piece in most cases.

What part of Florida did you find it?  If you are near the Space Coast you may have found metal debris but it doesn't look like a meteorite.

Mitchel

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If that were a meteorite, and you found it in salt water, it would be all rusted if not totally disintegrated. Whatever it is... it's not iron which is what most meteorites contain. Probably lead like Bob stated.

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Sucks but I thought I had one. I’ll post an update on what material the metal is when I found out. My friend who has been metal detecting the beaches for years and has hundreds of gold jewelry finds has given me his collection of what he believes are meteorites to get appraised and possibly sell. He’s old school and not much of an internet guy so I figured I’ll post them here to actually give this post some real content.

 

These are ferrous in nature, what do you guys think? Meteorites?

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Nope. Looks like either slag of some type or volcanic basalt. Most likely slag.

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That is slag. You can see pieces of the silica flux in them. Also they have gas bubbles. Something that just does not happen in an oxygen free environment.

Refractory waste is easily identified. It is the product of refining and is used to keep the metals from oxidizing. Therefore it is by nature almost entirely oxidized. What you have in your hand is various oxidized metals (mostly iron) and silica flux.

Meteorites are entirely unoxidized. They are formed in an oxygen free environment. So it is a fairly easy identification on pieces like that.

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