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A REAL Crust Buster


Dakota Slim

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It wasn't long ago that someone wrote that his dog had poked holes in the earth's crust. I had to point out that the "crust" is hard rock, meaning or bedrock. 
In any case, Qian Yuan, an Arizona State University graduate student presented this idea at last week’s Lunar and Planetary Science Conference...

THERE APPEARS TO BE A HUGE CHUNK OF AN ANCIENT PLANET BURIED INSIDE EARTH

THEIA'S IMPACT WITH THE EARTH CREATED THE MOON — AND PERHAPS LEFT SOME SHRAPNEL BEHIND.

 

https://futurism.com/the-byte/huge-chunk-ancient-planet-buried-inside-earth

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This all started on another thread where you said a big impact would put a hole in the earth's crust. I agreed with you and it made you so mad you wanted to debate the definition of the earths crust.

I said my dog digs holes in the earth's crust and you need to argue about something. So you are actually pretending dirt and gravel is not included in the geologic definition of "crust" to prove my dog didn't dig in it.

You are doing this on a forum where the majority of guys know a bit about geology. Some, like me, have actually taken courses in geology. But you have insulted that and suggested I may have failed (all 3 classes of) geology.

You are so confident that you have finally caught me in your clever snare you are willing to create a new thread to discuss it. 

Now you will learn something Slim. And you don't have to sit through 3 math classes, two chemistry classes and a physics class to get there.

New vocabulary word Slim. Write it in your notebook.

REGOLITH

Regolith is the weathered surface of the earth's crust. It consists of dust, soil, sediment, gravel and unconsolidated rock. 

It is where mineral deposits like placer gold, uranium, gemstones and many other minerals are mined from. 

Imagine that!

The earth's crust is defined as the outer layer from the surface to the mantle. Although the "lithosphere" includes the area at the boundary of the mantle. So some geologists may debate the boundary of the earths crust as it bears against the mantle. But only a fool would debate that the weathered surface of the earth's crust is not the crust.

So Slim. You have worked yourself into another corner. You got saucy and insulting and I ignored you. You know nothing about the subject nor have any experience but you are pissed off and just don't know when to quit. You have overextended yourself into an area you know very little about. You started a new thread to press the issue. So now you must put up or shut up.

If you can find one reference or article that says the weathered surface of the earths crust is not actually considered part of the crust then you will get a full apology from me as well as my dog.

Yes. The "crust" can be described as "solid rock". It IS solid rock. But that does not mean that the regolith (where it exists) is not part of the crust as well. On the contrary. By definition the crust is from the mantle to the surface. 

When you read the word "solid" and misinterpret that to mean "consolidated" or "unbroken" you display your lack of attention in physics class. So here is a physics lesson you don't have to sit through algebra 2 and trigonometry to attend.

There are 3 physical states of matter. Solid, liquid and gas.

You are welcome.

Now back to geology....

We know the mantle is liquid and the crust is defined as solid. So the crust is above the mantle. It is a solid all the way to the surface. And interestingly enough it is even a solid when it is finely divided like dust, dirt and gravel. Because dirt isn't liquid. And it isn't gas either.

So if it is above the mantle, below the surface, is a solid and is not a liquid or a gas then it is part of the earth's crust. Even if it is a weathered form of crust it is still crust. More specifically it is regolith. 

I know what you are thinking..."Trees and people are solid. Do you think they are part of the crust too you stupid liberal?"  No silly! This is geology class! Biomes are discussed in biology. Geology is about rocks and minerals. So while people, trees and toothbrushes are solid and on the surface they are not part of the crust. At least not yet. 

Now go back in time and find that geology teacher and apologize to him. You weren't paying attention. Either that or tell him you want your money back because he didn't teach you the basic terminology needed to win a silly argument you started on the internet over a dog digging a hole in the earth's crust.

Either that or you started an argument with someone who has actually taken a geology class and you have not. I suspect that may be the case here. In which case you should hire a geology teacher to teach you about the earths crust.

You might spend a few bucks on a massage too. You are just cranky as heck and tend to start fights you can't possibly win. That couldn't be much fun. Relaxing a little might help to avoid that situation.

Anyhoo, we learned a new vocabulary word today. REGOLITH. It will be on the test Friday and you will be expected to spell it correctly and use it in a sentence as in the example below.

 "My dog can excavate more regolith in one afternoon than you have moved in the past ten years."

:25r30wi:

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If Theia’s remnants do lie deep in Earth’s mantle, they may not be alone. Seismologists are increasingly seeing small, ultradense pockets of material in the deep mantle, only a few hundred kilometers across, often near the edges of the LLSVPs. Maybe they are the sunken remnants of iron-rich cores from other miniature planets that hit early Earth, Jenkins says. Theia, in fact, might be just one grave in a planetary cemetery.  

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/03/remains-impact-created-moon-may-lie-deep-within-earth

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In school, you probably learned that our planet is made up of four distinct layers: the crust, the mantle, the outer core, and the inner core.

But new research by a team of scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) is shaking up the game: like a Russian doll, they say, the inner core has yet another core hidden inside of it.

https://futurism.com/the-byte/scientists-something-earth-core

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7 hours ago, hardtimehermit said:

This is what can happen if someone goes in the deep end without knowing how to swim, i love the word Regolith, might give my next dog that name. :rolleyes:

I was thinking the same thing about naming the dog Regolith. That is a good name for a dog. Especially one prone to poking holes in the earth's crust!

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There are many who feel we should reunite Pangaea. 

And I have often pondered the breadth and depth of the Pacific Ocean. (darn it is deep and wide)

I have always thought of the layers of the earth like a turducken. And the theory that there may be yet another species of fowl (possibly a quail) inside the chicken at the core is intriguing.

But now I am completely consumed by Russian dolls. It is amazing how similar they are to the core of the earth. I had never really thought about it much until Slim brought it up but it is an excellent point. 

It is a much better analogy than a turducken. And you can comb their hair and dress them up. You just can't do that with baked meat.

The Russian doll theory will no doubt become one of the greatest advancements in geology since the discovery that dirt is part of the earths crust.

:stupidrb:

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On 3/26/2021 at 8:39 PM, Bedrock Bob said:

This all started on another thread where you said a big impact would put a hole in the earth's crust. I agreed with you and it made you so mad you wanted to debate the definition of the earths crust.

I said my dog digs holes in the earth's crust and you need to argue about something. So you are actually pretending dirt and gravel is not included in the geologic definition of "crust" to prove my dog didn't dig in it.

You are doing this on a forum where the majority of guys know a bit about geology. Some, like me, have actually taken courses in geology. But you have insulted that and suggested I may have failed (all 3 classes of) geology.

You are so confident that you have finally caught me in your clever snare you are willing to create a new thread to discuss it. 

Now you will learn something Slim. And you don't have to sit through 3 math classes, two chemistry classes and a physics class to get there.

New vocabulary word Slim. Write it in your notebook.

REGOLITH

Regolith is the weathered surface of the earth's crust. It consists of dust, soil, sediment, gravel and unconsolidated rock. 

It is where mineral deposits like placer gold, uranium, gemstones and many other minerals are mined from. 

Imagine that!

The earth's crust is defined as the outer layer from the surface to the mantle. Although the "lithosphere" includes the area at the boundary of the mantle. So some geologists may debate the boundary of the earths crust as it bears against the mantle. But only a fool would debate that the weathered surface of the earth's crust is not the crust.

So Slim. You have worked yourself into another corner. You got saucy and insulting and I ignored you. You know nothing about the subject nor have any experience but you are pissed off and just don't know when to quit. You have overextended yourself into an area you know very little about. You started a new thread to press the issue. So now you must put up or shut up.

If you can find one reference or article that says the weathered surface of the earths crust is not actually considered part of the crust then you will get a full apology from me as well as my dog.

Yes. The "crust" can be described as "solid rock". It IS solid rock. But that does not mean that the regolith (where it exists) is not part of the crust as well. On the contrary. By definition the crust is from the mantle to the surface. 

When you read the word "solid" and misinterpret that to mean "consolidated" or "unbroken" you display your lack of attention in physics class. So here is a physics lesson you don't have to sit through algebra 2 and trigonometry to attend.

There are 3 physical states of matter. Solid, liquid and gas.

You are welcome.

Now back to geology....

We know the mantle is liquid and the crust is defined as solid. So the crust is above the mantle. It is a solid all the way to the surface. And interestingly enough it is even a solid when it is finely divided like dust, dirt and gravel. Because dirt isn't liquid. And it isn't gas either.

So if it is above the mantle, below the surface, is a solid and is not a liquid or a gas then it is part of the earth's crust. Even if it is a weathered form of crust it is still crust. More specifically it is regolith. 

I know what you are thinking..."Trees and people are solid. Do you think they are part of the crust too you stupid liberal?"  No silly! This is geology class! Biomes are discussed in biology. Geology is about rocks and minerals. So while people, trees and toothbrushes are solid and on the surface they are not part of the crust. At least not yet. 

Now go back in time and find that geology teacher and apologize to him. You weren't paying attention. Either that or tell him you want your money back because he didn't teach you the basic terminology needed to win a silly argument you started on the internet over a dog digging a hole in the earth's crust.

Either that or you started an argument with someone who has actually taken a geology class and you have not. I suspect that may be the case here. In which case you should hire a geology teacher to teach you about the earths crust.

You might spend a few bucks on a massage too. You are just cranky as heck and tend to start fights you can't possibly win. That couldn't be much fun. Relaxing a little might help to avoid that situation.

Anyhoo, we learned a new vocabulary word today. REGOLITH. It will be on the test Friday and you will be expected to spell it correctly and use it in a sentence as in the example below.

 "My dog can excavate more regolith in one afternoon than you have moved in the past ten years."

:25r30wi:

 

166801539_3965085200221636_30897594005576198_n.jpg

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