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A guy I met had a truckload of these things. He wanted a buck each for them. He also had front and back body pads, beavertails and diapers, sleeves and cuffs and a couple rectangular sizes.

It was all the same surplus stuff past its expiration date. 

20210204_152956.jpg

It stopped a 9mm round at about 20 feet. It would have still caused a lot of damage but the bullet would not penetrate. I'm going to try it with a .38 and then a .357 to see how those affect it. I bet it stops the .38.

They are not real heavy. They aren't light for sure. A complete set of pads was only about a heavy as a big coat. By the time you stick those on a vest it is probably 4 or 5 pounds at least.

They have the mega Velcro on the back so you could stick them anywhere on gear or a vehicle. I'm thinking door panels and seat backs.

Anyhow I thought it was cool to meet a traveling armor salesman. I'm sure he is selling that stuff as fast as he can stuff money in his pockets.

 

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I thought about lining the canvas doors on the Land Cruiser with them. But then I thought about a bullet hitting one and carrying it into me.

I guess it would be better than nothing. But it would rip that little pad right off the door with very little resistance. The pad and the bullet would both become a projectile.

It seems the pads need a solid backing or an impact would just pluck it off. Maybe even just shove it to the side and let the bullet pass by.

The seat back idea works.  But I'm almost convinced they are better against your body secured to a vest than vehicle armor. Especially in a convertible.

I have a military coat with the snap in liner. I'm thinking you could sew some Velcro strategically to that liner and stick those pads on it. You could cover your important giblets with 8-10 pads and hardly know they were there. They would be sandwiched in between the coat and the liner so you would never even see them.

We had a wicked shootout here a couple days ago. A real badass wearing body armor got shot to hell on the highway after killing a cop. He was a trained professional that put on quite a show before he went down. I couldn't help but think his body armor didn't do him much good against a half dozen cops banging away at him. But in a self defense situation one of those little pads in the right place might make a whole lot of difference in a fight.

 

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On 2/4/2021 at 5:11 PM, Bedrock Bob said:

A guy I met had a truckload of these things. He wanted a buck each for them. He also had front and back body pads, beavertails and diapers, sleeves and cuffs and a couple rectangular sizes.

It was all the same surplus stuff past its expiration date. 

20210204_152956.jpg

It stopped a 9mm round at about 20 feet. It would have still caused a lot of damage but the bullet would not penetrate. I'm going to try it with a .38 and then a .357 to see how those affect it. I bet it stops the .38.

They are not real heavy. They aren't light for sure. A complete set of pads was only about a heavy as a big coat. By the time you stick those on a vest it is probably 4 or 5 pounds at least.

They have the mega Velcro on the back so you could stick them anywhere on gear or a vehicle. I'm thinking door panels and seat backs.

Anyhow I thought it was cool to meet a traveling armor salesman. I'm sure he is selling that stuff as fast as he can stuff money in his pockets.

 

Why would they need to put an expiration date on something like those? Seems like they would last forever.

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2 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Why would they need to put an expiration date on something like those? Seems like they would last forever.

I'm not sure. It might be a contract requirement. Or some of the materials might break down or change with time.

It is like thin layers of plastic inside. Maybe that stuff gets brittle over time?

I was wondering the same thing myself when I was shooting at it. Afterwards I didn't think about the expiration date that much.

I have an armored vest that I posted a story about a couple years back. Some cops were shooting at it and I wound up taking it home. It has a manufacturers date and an expiration date too.

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50 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Why would they need to put an expiration date on something like those? Seems like they would last forever.

It is because the fibers the armor is made out of break down after so long, making it less reliable. Sun and element exposure speeds up the process. We got to shoot and test new armor and old armor "as per date of manufacturing" and we didn't see a difference. But they say there is a time frame it will break down in. Even the carbon fiber body plates had dates. Hardhats have a 5 year expiration date too! Cant remember the timeline on armor.

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54 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

The vest I have has a piece of 3/8" plate steel in a chest pocket. I replace the steel plate every 4 years to insure optimal protection.

 

You're just kidding... right?

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On 2/4/2021 at 3:11 PM, Bedrock Bob said:

A guy I met had a truckload of these things. He wanted a buck each for them. He also had front and back body pads, beavertails and diapers, sleeves and cuffs and a couple rectangular sizes.

It was all the same surplus stuff past its expiration date. 

20210204_152956.jpg

It stopped a 9mm round at about 20 feet. It would have still caused a lot of damage but the bullet would not penetrate. I'm going to try it with a .38 and then a .357 to see how those affect it. I bet it stops the .38.

They are not real heavy. They aren't light for sure. A complete set of pads was only about a heavy as a big coat. By the time you stick those on a vest it is probably 4 or 5 pounds at least.

They have the mega Velcro on the back so you could stick them anywhere on gear or a vehicle. I'm thinking door panels and seat backs.

Anyhow I thought it was cool to meet a traveling armor salesman. I'm sure he is selling that stuff as fast as he can stuff money in his pockets.

As for the expiration date, I've personally shot 30+ year old soft armor, that had been used hard. It performed to it's rating. 

Good score👍

Regards, Kyle

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On 2/8/2021 at 1:31 PM, Bedrock Bob said:

The vest I have has a piece of 3/8" plate steel in a chest pocket. I replace the steel plate every 4 years to insure optimal protection.

Had a former Marine come over to us and tell us about the old Flak Vests from the Korean/Vietnam War we had been issued in the late 80's, a couple guys in his detachment had used those to see how many it would take to be bulletproof.  These Flak Vests are way less protective than bulletproof vests, and came in plastic plates.  One guy put three on and his friend shot him with a 9mm sidearm.  It went through two and stopped at the third.  He was quite sore.

I never knew the soft plated stuff you showed would stop a bullet.  The later bulletproof vests we were issued had all that soft armor surrounding the vital areas where the Kevlar plates did not reach.  After the initial issue, a few years went by, and we noticed that the armor had expired, so a new purchase was made.  Nice to hear it has held up well to the test of time.

Edited by chrisski
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Chris,

That stuff is pretty amazing. It actually collects under the point of impact. Like the bullet pulls that stuff under it.

The pad isn't 1/2" thick. The bullet does not even go into the material at all. It just crushes a wad in front of it.

It will stop a .38 and a .357 mag. when it has a plywood backing. But the backing was a small piece of wood leaning in a bush. 

Things might be different depending on what backing the pad has. If it was against a piece of steel a bullet might cut through. 

Against your chest a .357 magnum would probably break all your ribs and damage organs. A 30-06 would blow the whole bag out a hole on the other side. But against a hard surface I think most bullets would cut through the pad more than if it was worn against the body.

The bullet might not penetrate. And that is a good thing. But you still have to absorb the shock. A slower, or lighter projectile would be effectively stopped and not do too much damage. But a big, fast moving projectile would be like getting hit with a sledge hammer. 

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