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Here is a good article on the ammo situation. 

https://www.outdoorlife.com/story/guns/wheres-all-the-darn-ammo-federal-premiums-president-has-some-answers/

My son and I are dabbling in auto pistol. 9mm & .45 acp. It is really tough to find components.

Bullets are scarce and primers are non-existent. Developing a new cartridge is difficult in this brave new world. It is not impossible to get the stuff you need but you can't just go down to Sportsman's Warehouse and get it.

We needed brass. New brass is unavailable and once fired and tumbled brass was expensive. So I decided to just hunt at the shooting spots and find what we needed.

I have met a half dozen guys out prospecting brass in the last couple weeks. It is always the same story. They are saving what they can use and selling the rest. 

In the last couple weeks I have done pretty good on brass. I have found about $100 worth of 9mm and have about $50 worth of misc. brass to sell. I have put in about 6-8 hours of hunting time after I shoot. I'm thinking about spending a couple days just hitting every shooting spot  one after the other. I actually think I could make a hundred bucks a day. Maybe more.

The same spots I frequent are being hunted by several other guys. So the number of people shooting is amazing. I can hunt the same spots every day and pick up pocketfulls of brass.

It's like hitting little flakes with a metal detector. They add up quick. And there is a ready market for the stuff.

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11 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Here is a good article on the ammo situation. 

https://www.outdoorlife.com/story/guns/wheres-all-the-darn-ammo-federal-premiums-president-has-some-answers/

My son and I are dabbling in auto pistol. 9mm & .45 acp. It is really tough to find components.

Bullets are scarce and primers are non-existent. Developing a new cartridge is difficult in this brave new world. It is not impossible to get the stuff you need but you can't just go down to Sportsman's Warehouse and get it.

We needed brass. New brass is unavailable and once fired and tumbled brass was expensive. So I decided to just hunt at the shooting spots and find what we needed.

I have met a half dozen guys out prospecting brass in the last couple weeks. It is always the same story. They are saving what they can use and selling the rest. 

In the last couple weeks I have done pretty good on brass. I have found about $100 worth of 9mm and have about $50 worth of misc. brass to sell. I have put in about 6-8 hours of hunting time after I shoot. I'm thinking about spending a couple days just hitting every shooting spot  one after the other. I actually think I could make a hundred bucks a day. Maybe more.

The same spots I frequent are being hunted by several other guys. So the number of people shooting is amazing. I can hunt the same spots every day and pick up pocketfulls of brass.

It's like hitting little flakes with a metal detector. They add up quick. And there is a ready market for the stuff.

Hmmm, does sounds a little like nugget hunting, a new prospect on finding a little treasure.

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It's like finding nickels and dimes. 

I went out this morning and hunted for a couple hours. I got several pounds of mostly 9mm and .223. I hit a few .308, .300 win mags, a few .270 and an assortment of misc. cases.

If a guy bought range brass for $1.50 per pound and processed it you could make some money. Some of the magnum rifle cases will fetch .50 cents each. None are worth less than .25 cents.

My shooting buddy has a couple of commercial Camdex reloading machines. We are thinking about tumbling, sizing and marketing the prepared brass.

Most guys are just selling the unsorted brass for 1.50 per pound. I bet you could pay them a few cents more and process it. It does not take long to sort it. Tumbling is easy. And the Camdex machine will spit out about 3 rounds per second once you get it set up and fill the hopper with polished brass.

It would take a lot of brass to make any real money on it. But if you could buy it from people at a fair price that would justify them picking it up you could turn a pretty good profit by processing it.

I cranked out 500 rounds of 9mm yesterday on my single stage press. At a nickel each that is $250 worth of prepared brass. Even if I don't sell any of it it was worth picking it up.

I'm going to tumble, size and trim 1000 .223 rounds over the next few days.

We have a big 45 gallon trash barrel full of .38 special rounds that we have had for 20 years. Im thinking we should tumble and size it with the high speed press and offer it to the masses. At the very least we could sell it in bulk to a commercial reloader.

The last time we had an ammo shortage I bought a flatbed trailer of .22lr and .223 ammo. We peddled that at the gun shows and doubled our investment. I think a fellow could do almost that good processing brass and selling it. Or even reloading it and selling ammo. You can still buy components if you are willing to spend a few thousand dollars and buy in big quantities.

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Ammo and component shortage is crazy every where. If your looking to make some money, and have some .223 brass

you may want to consider making it into 300 blackout brass. Your market may be smaller, but the profits higher.

300BLK brass in non existent, worse than .223.

Pretty easy to do, basically cut it off at the shoulder, run it through a sizing die, and case trim to length.

There's several jigs available online, and plenty of you tube videos.

I made a jig with stuff I had laying around, and a 10" miter box.  

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I have found about 100 pieces of .300 BLK brass so far. I traded them to a guy for .270 brass a couple days ago. He really wanted them bad because he traded me 2:1 for the .270.

I'm not interested in reforming cases. I don't have the dies on hand and I am not set up to advertise specialty brass. I just plan on sizing the calibers I am equipped for.

Reformed brass gets pretty stiff. In most cases it really needs to be fireformed and annealed. I know this is true when making cases from 30-06 brass. We have done everything from. 243 to .25-06 and case life is extremely short without annealing. I suppose the .300 cases might be different. I know 6mm TCU (which is a very similar reforming process) is fairly easy and does not always need annealing.

I guess it all depends on what brass you start with and where you are going with it. The shoulder on a .300 is a lot gentler than any round built from a 30-06 case and that certainly would make a huge difference 

 

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