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(NEW) Can you ID this rock?


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Here is a rock collected from Hudson's Bay Nastapoka Arc area.  My husband is convinced it's a meteorite...from a big impact.  I hope video uploads... if not I will post You tube links.

Exterior of rock is slate like... interior is lighter and softer (like hardened clay)    Some still had 'bubble' over holes 

ps... I don' t  think it's a meteorite... but  something BIG caused the geology in area...

 

 

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Its not a meteorite.  From the video alone, I cannot tell what type of rock this is.  Can you can supply us with some clear, close up photos?

Its a very interring rock.

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Those are spherical inclusions in what appears to be a volcanic or sedimentary metamorphic matrix.

There are stones with big spherical inclusions like those in several areas I am familiar with. In those instances the geology is volcanic. 

But...

In my area almost everything is volcanic. From what I understand volcanic rocks are uncommon in your area. 

I would expect the darker rock to be sedimentary metamorphic rock of some sort with spherical mineral inclusions.

I could be completely wrong about it though. I dont know much about rock ID like a lot of these fellows here. But I can tell you for certain it is not hematite.

 

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Here's another video... Hope this is better...  My pics aren't as good 

Clearly shows fusion crust...  

(i don't believe it is a meteorite... but that Nastapoka Arc was certainly created by some cataclysmic event

Hope to hear back!

Cheers!

J.

 

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And another vid.

I think iits volcanic in origin also, but very little evidence or even old native legends that talk about volcanoes ... but several Cree and Inuit (Eskimo) stories of a large fireball event...  Geologists I've met up there didn't have a clue either (so we wouldn't tell them where we found them- lol)  
 

Would love to know what caused the Nastapoka Arc...  You can follow a trail of impact-looking areas across Quebec (CANADA) and into Maritime Provinces by St Lawrence seaway.  Perhaps the cause of the infamous Mud Flood :)

J.

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47 minutes ago, PhilanthroPest said:

Here's another video... Hope this is better...  My pics aren't as good 

Clearly shows fusion crust...  

(i don't believe it is a meteorite... but that Nastapoka Arc was certainly created by some cataclysmic event

Hope to hear back!

Cheers!

J.

 

Only meteorites have a fusion crust. You don’t believe it's a meteorite, so you probably shouldn’t say it’s got a fusion crust.

I very rarely am certain about a stone’s ID just from looking at pics or video, but I’m going to say this is 100% a broken concretion. 

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you are right,  I was repeating wha the geologists up there said.... the rocks are various sizes..mostly rounded.. all have an outer "crust"(?) that seems to be like slate and the interiors are lighter, softer- almost like hardened clay.   The whole region is clay...  All i know is none could explain other than similar rocks have been found in NWestern states but circles are much less pronounced and exterior "crust" is thinner... Please ignore my husband's chatter about these being meteorites.... may be ejecta from an extraordinary event.  It's also non--magnetic but compass will spin when over them. 

Edited by PhilanthroPest
missed detail... corrected spelling mistake
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2 hours ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

I had to look that up.

. Seems to fit the description.

You learn all kinds of new stuff on these forums don't you!

I guess "Omars" all come from a certain formation. But there are lots of rocks that have spherical inclusions that weather out to leave sockets like that. 

What would you call a rock with a socket in it? Is there a geological name for that socket formed when a spherical inclusion drops out? 

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1 hour ago, Bedrock Bob said:

You learn all kinds of new stuff on these forums don't you

Is there a geological name for that socket formed when a spherical inclusion drops out? 

:idunno:Call it a cavity.

Yup, the   omar , if it is, came from some particular rocks in Hudson Bay. But that descrip has it as being greywacke.

 

https://northernwilds.com/the-omars-and-yooperlites-of-northern-wilds/

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I have heard of Yooperlites before, but not of Omars.  Thanks for sharing the link about these rocks Stillweaver!

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