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A geologist can't evaluate a hunk of metal. That is just not what they do.

Neither can they evaluate meteorites. Same reason.

A plumber who hunts meteorites knows a lot more about them than a geologist who does not. To a geologist everything looks like a rock. 

You need to develop inroads to an expert in the field of meteoritics. One that has the time and inclination to render their opinion. 

In my experience that is nearly as difficult and a lot less fun than finding them.

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It is interesting. The finish on it is unusual. I would not rule it out. It is either a piece of tramp metal or an iron meteorite. I would polish that face up to a 1500 grit shine and try to

I know Dan, i meant to point that out, but just being hopeful here for the good lad seems to have a decent meteorite suspect. At least we are not talking about sedimentary meteorites from Mars 

IMHO examining what you think might be an impact on the concrete is not a worthwhile effort. The rock is the only thing that really matters. I'm not sure how the concrete or the fence is relative to t

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Here's a meteorite testing service that I found online. Pretty reasonable price all things considered. I wouldn't rely on just sending photos. It needs to be examined and tested in person by an expert.

http://meteoritetesting.org/Submitting%20a%20sample.htm
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Testing irons are tricky. 

Most experienced hunters can take a good look at a rock and pretty much tell if it is a chondrite meteorite or not. But a lump of iron from the sky is often indiscernable from a lump of iron from the side of the railroad track. Even the experts wrestle over some irons.

It is relatively easy to pair an iron to a known meteorite. Even if the fragment does not appear to be a meteorite. It is another story all together with a new classification.

Irons aren't meteorites until an expert says they are. And a whole lot of tramp metal looks a whole lot like an iron meteorite. Tests to differentiate the materials are pretty complex. And it takes someone with knowledge and access to the equipment to perform and interpret those tests. It is more involved and a lot different than identifying a chondrite meteorite.

At least that is what an "expert" told me and I took his word for it. 

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Pretty cool stuff. I can't say I have seen anything like that in a meteorite or tramp metal. It is definitely not a mineral and I would say those crystals indicate cooling a lot slower than you would find in a smelted metal. But I am just guessing at this point. 

I don't think that is just a void in a casting. It is definitely not a gas bubble either. I don't know if it is meteoritic but it darn sure isn't something I have ever seen in a chunk of steel.

I have no idea what it is. :idunno:

...too bad it wasn't a big chunk of Olivine huh?

 

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Diamond tile saw blade.  One edge peeled back towards the end of the cut.  These are pics of that area where there are no blade marks. See attached.

876C7483-955D-4A2D-BC3E-8445BD50C18E.jpeg

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 5/29/2020 at 10:45 AM, Mikestang said:

Most geologists wouldn't know a meteorite if it hit them on the head.  Make sure you talk with a meteorite scientist and not just a geologist.

 

 

If this is an iron meteorite, any misshaping of the pieces happened when it exploded and would not have occurred on the ground.  The forces required to bend and twist solid iron are much greater than can be produced by a terminal velocity impact of such a small piece of metal.

Even if it plowed into a concrete sidewalk?
 

Here are some updates and pics:

Not sure how I missed the sidewalk damage.  You can see the damage tails off to the right towards the fence where this meteorite was found. 
 

There is some unexplained fence damage right where you would expect as well.
 

The fence was painted and the mulch added during the summer of 2017.  


I then found this report and media of a green meteorite fall from Dec 18 2017.   My home is ~10 miles away from the camera and directly in the path of this fall.  You can see part of the fall separate in the video as well.

https://www.channel3000.com/green-meteor-spotted-in-madison
 

I would like to thank everyone here for sharing their knowledge.

Ken...

 

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C7A44461-5FB6-4244-987A-52F49FAF5DAF.jpeg

2DA940E1-D1BE-4A98-AC18-C6AA64D19C8E.jpeg

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The swipe on the fence is horizontal, someone hit it with their bike, not from a falling object.  The chip out of the concrete looks to be just that - a chip out of the concrete, and the chip appears to be much older than 2017 from how the concrete has worn.

Edited by Mikestang
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Here's a website that I found by googling "amateur meteor sittings."  I suggest you go to the day to see if its anywhere by you.

I'll say I believe the chip in the concrete could be as old as you say.  My housing area is 15 years old and as I go on my hour long walk in the morning I see hundreds of chips in the concrete that look just like that, and they always seem to be in the seam of the concrete.  So, I'm not saying I don't think its caused by a meteorite, but concrete cracking along a seam is hardly conclusive.  Maybe one in a gazillion chance, but the means there's a chance.

Is the damage to a fence along a seam or right by a gate?  If that's a meteor strike, perhaps all the dents I thought were from my kids that ran into my car with their bikes and door dings could be something else?  I guess its my story and I'll tell it how I want.

In all seriousness, I will propose a counter theory.  Perhaps it was something being worked by native Americans, that got thrown in the discard pile, or even from a colonial blacksmith.

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The fence marking is in between the walk damage and where the find was located.  So no I was not saying the fence damage was directly from the fall but a secondary obstruction.   Exact same size marking in the correct direction.  No other markings on the fence whatsoever. 

Sidewalk damage is the same size as the fall.

So you are an expert on sidewalk weatherization  for 2.5 years of climate specific wear?   Sorry man you are the one reaching here.

 

08986751-C32C-4648-8966-11743352D608.jpeg

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12 minutes ago, chrisski said:

Here's a website that I found by googling "amateur meteor sittings."  I suggest you go to the day to see if its anywhere by you.

I'll say I believe the chip in the concrete could be as old as you say.  My housing area is 15 years old and as I go on my hour long walk in the morning I see hundreds of chips in the concrete that look just like that, and they always seem to be in the seam of the concrete.  So, I'm not saying I don't think its caused by a meteorite, but concrete cracking along a seam is hardly conclusive.  Maybe one in a gazillion chance, but the means there's a chance.

Is the damage to a fence along a seam or right by a gate?  If that's a meteor strike, perhaps all the dents I thought were from my kids that ran into my car with their bikes and door dings could be something else?  I guess its my story and I'll tell it how I want.

In all seriousness, I will propose a counter theory.  Perhaps it was something being worked by native Americans, that got thrown in the discard pile, or even from a colonial blacksmith.

The fall was fused with pieces of the mulch and still holds some.   

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1 minute ago, Bawaayce said:

The fall was fused with pieces of the mulch and still holds some.   

This side of the fence only runs for 70 feet.  There is no gate on this side.  The mulch runs between the sidewalk and the fence.  There is no traffic on this sidewalk as it dead ends into a wood. There is no ingress on that end.  So much so we do not shovel this walk in the winter.  It’s just not used.

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The sidewalk pics are taken facing East.  The fence pics are taken facing south

Here is a pic showing an asymmetrical damage pattern.  East end shows a wider pattern you would expect from the egress side.

 

CE154498-B47A-42F2-BE2B-00007D43D659.jpeg

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I've spent my entire career in the concrete construction business. I can guarantee you if the impact was enough to do that to the concrete, the fence would be in a whole bunch worse shape.

Jim

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6 minutes ago, Idaho Jim said:

I've spent my entire career in the concrete construction business. I can guarantee you if the impact was enough to do that to the concrete, the fence would be in a whole bunch worse shape.

Jim

What if it went through a bunch of mulch or through one of the bushes?   I’m just presenting the evidence as I have it.  Comments need a measure of subjectivity.   

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13 minutes ago, Idaho Jim said:

I've spent my entire career in the concrete construction business. I can guarantee you if the impact was enough to do that to the concrete, the fence would be in a whole bunch worse shape.

Jim

Angle of impact would play into the concrete damage and potential energy after impact.  

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Ken, 

No, a 182 gm iron meteorite would slow to terminal velocity of about 200 mph and fall at the end of its flight path almost vertically. It would be the same as if you had dropped the same sized rock from a Cessna airplane at 10,000 feet. It would dent concrete, but would not make a trench. Even if the initial meteorite path was just under an Earth skimmer the angle of impact would be no more than about 20 degrees from vertical. 

Neither the trench nor the scuff marks on the fence were caused by a meteorite.

Your rock needs to be professionally evaluated in my opinion.

billpeters

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30 minutes ago, billpeters said:

Ken, 

No, a 182 gm iron meteorite would slow to terminal velocity of about 200 mph and fall at the end of its flight path almost vertically. It would be the same as if you had dropped the same sized rock from a Cessna airplane at 10,000 feet. It would dent concrete, but would not make a trench. Even if the initial meteorite path was just under an Earth skimmer the angle of impact would be no more than about 20 degrees from vertical. 

Neither the trench nor the scuff marks on the fence were caused by a meteorite.

Your rock needs to be professionally evaluated in my opinion.

billpeters

Using E=.5*M*(V*V) The footpound energy is 536 so, assuming the contact area is ~1" this object would have energy of 6,432 pounds per square inch.

Seeing the strike was close to the joint it is extreamly possible the concreate damange was caused by the fall. 

I am working on getting the meteorite essayed.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

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Take a 30 cal pistol and fire a round, that has around 500 ft/lbs of energy, into a hunk of concrete, and see what you get. Won't be anything like what you're seeing there, trust me.

 I'm not saying it isn't a meteorite....just saying if it did that damage, there would have been hunks of rock flying all over, if it did. There'd be dents, scratches and holes in the fence, at minimum. And, the mark on the fence is far to symmetrical, and regular to be caused by that rock.

Jim

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IMHO examining what you think might be an impact on the concrete is not a worthwhile effort. The rock is the only thing that really matters. I'm not sure how the concrete or the fence is relative to the discussion.

The rock is odd. An expert needs to take a look and render an opinion. There is not much more that anyone could do to prove or disprove it is a meteorite.

 Neither the sidewalk nor the fence lends any clues to the origin of the stone. If anything it indicates that the stone is not a meteorite if the damage was indeed caused by your stone.

I am not sure what information an assay might offer. Can you tell us why you think an assay might provide information on the origin?

 

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1 hour ago, Bedrock Bob said:

IMHO examining what you think might be an impact on the concrete is not a worthwhile effort. The rock is the only thing that really matters. I'm not sure how the concrete or the fence is relative to the discussion.

The rock is odd. An expert needs to take a look and render an opinion. There is not much more that anyone could do to prove or disprove it is a meteorite.

 Neither the sidewalk nor the fence lends any clues to the origin of the stone. If anything it indicates that the stone is not a meteorite if the damage was indeed caused by your stone.

I am not sure what information an assay might offer. Can you tell us why you think an assay might provide information on the origin?

 

The assay would be on the metal construct with regards to the percentage of for iron, nickel, chromium, and manganese.

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20 hours ago, Bawaayce said:

Using E=.5*M*(V*V) The footpound energy is 536 so, assuming the contact area is ~1" this object would have energy of 6,432 pounds per square inch.

Seeing the strike was close to the joint it is extreamly possible the concreate damange was caused by the fall. 

I am working on getting the meteorite essayed.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Took a another look at the sidewalk damage last eve and it had been raining.  I took a pic from a standing top down perspective.  
 

Seems to me there is an oval footprint Which is the same shape and size of my iron mystery rock (IMR)
 

The end of the IMR I took a sample of did have a flattened section.

Not trying to stir up anything just posting aspects that seem to have relevance.

 

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19 hours ago, Bawaayce said:

The assay would be on the metal construct with regards to the percentage of for iron, nickel, chromium, and manganese.

Can you tell us why you think an assay might provide information on origin?

Can you tell us why the damage to the sidewalk might provide information on origin?

I just don't understand how either of these get you any closer to figuring out if this rock is meteoritic. 

Can you explain the rationale?

I like the rock and I think it deserves further investigation. I am just not sure why the path is leading in the direction it is. It does not seem to be the way to go about investigating a suspect meteorite and I wonder why you have chosen this path.

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