Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Hello, in a dog walk again  i found this small rock.

Is not to much heavy and attract the most of the rock magnet but very week. Except some points  here and there with huge magnet attracting.

I scratch one of this point and they have metallic iron.  One photo is better from 1000 words.

They have metallic iron for sure 100% but i don't know if is meteorite.

I take the photo with or without sun light.

In microscope the metallic surface looks to have Widmanstatten parallel in many directions. 

The rock dimension is : 2,9 x 2,6 x 1,6 cm 

1.JPG

2.JPG

3.JPG

4.JPG

5.JPG

6.JPG

Edited by ivigo
Link to post
Share on other sites

Next time your dog takes you for a walk let him bring the rocks home, and you just pay attention to the trail. :brows:  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, hardtimehermit said:

Next time your dog takes you for a walk let him bring the rocks home, and you just pay attention to the trail. :brows:  

Also in microscope again i see they have many spherical things in green-blue color with white clouds ,  like as you see a cloud earth from space.

Strange!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, ivigo said:

Also in microscope again i see they have many spherical things in green-blue color with white clouds ,  like as you see a cloud earth from space.

Strange!!!

Those strange spherical things are called chondrules. Chondrules and free metallic iron are how a suspect meteorite is identified.

Your rock has neither. Sorry.

Have someone teach your dog about these basic characteristics and he can tell you which rocks to bring home and obsess over.

:)

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ivigo said:

Hello, in a dog walk again  i found this small rock.

 

2 hours ago, hardtimehermit said:

Next time your dog takes you for a walk let him bring the rocks home, and you just pay attention to the trail. :brows:  

Yes teach your dogs how to find meteorites......BUT be careful with as many meteorites as you have been finding, I'm sure more are falling to earth everyday in your neighborhood which could be very dangerous to your dogs!!

http://www.nakhladogmeteorites.com/aboutnakhladog.htm

"

The Nakhla Dog
A Century of Conflict

Beheira is a region of rich farming land located in the middle of the Nile delta. Its densely populated and fertile landscape is dotted with mud huts and every other square inch is under intense cultivation with fields growing a wide variety of crops such as wheat and cotton as well as strawberries, okra and cucumbers. It is perhaps best known for its production of a fine variety of tobacco which is used in huqqah smoking.

On the 28th of June, 1911 at nine o'clock in the morning while standing in one of those fertile fields, a farmer by the name of Mohammed Ali Effendi Hakim observed something strange in the skies about his village of Denshal, near Nakhla (40 kilometers south-east of Alexandria). First he heard a "terrific" noise in his field and then looking up he saw that the sky had been streaked with a "fearful column" of white smoke. A dog, which had been there only moments before had been transformed into "ashes in the moment."

To be born a dog in the modern Middle East would not, I think it's a reasonable to say, be the luckiest thing in the world. That seems especially so in a country like Egypt where in ancient times dogs had been considered sacred (and were even mummified) but were now, at least since the advent of Islam, thought of as unclean and lowly creatures fit only for hunting and guard duty. But the fate of Hakim's dog would have to be considered an extremely unlucky case of being at the wrong place at exactly the wrong time.

Sometime before he crawled out from his resting and venturing out into Egyptian summer heat (that "sometime" being anything between 11 and 1,300 million years before) a massive meteor plummeted into the surface of the planet Mars. Its impact was so great that it launched into space several tons of Martian volcanic and sedimentary material.

nd-page-dog.jpg
nd-page-nakhla.jpg
nd-page-eqypt.jpg

This material went into orbit around the Sun where it collided with other rocks, broke into smaller particles and got bathed in cosmic radiation. At the time when the fragment of rock that later became known as the Nakhla meteorite broke away from the other material, Hakim's dog's wolf-like ancestors had only just diverged from their fox-like cousins (Mohammed Ali Effendi Hakim's ancestors meanwhile had not yet differentiated themselves from orangutans or gorillas).

It was said at the time that the death of the dog was the only fatality ever recorded for a meteorite. It was certainly this angle of the story that led the Egyptian newspaper El Ahali to send a reporter to Denshal to interview the farmer who showed him a greenish fragment covered in pitch. He said that numerous shards had plummeted to earth and buried themselves to depths of up to one meter. The news when it was translated into English prompted a few British scientists, who were residents of Egypt, to visit the strewnfield area. They succeeded in recovering about 10 kilograms of the meteorite.

Curiously, none of them visited Denshal or communicated any further with Hakim whose eyewitness account was the very first report of the event. John Ball of the Egyptian Survey Department stated that the meteorite would probably have been lost to science altogether "but for the action of a farmer, Mohammed Ali Effendi Hakim, who communicated a note of the occurrence to the Arabic Newspaper El Ahali." But after discussions via telegram with an official in Denshal, Ball concluded that the dog story was the likely "product of a lively imagination."

The debate continues today as to the verity of Hakim’s account and the existence of the dog but one can not escape its reference in virtually every major text and reference from The Catalog of Meteorites to NASA."

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
58 minutes ago, Au Seeker said:

 

Yes teach your dogs how to find meteorites......BUT be careful with as many meteorites as you have been finding, I'm sure more are falling to earth everyday in your neighborhood which could be very dangerous to your dogs!!

http://www.nakhladogmeteorites.com/aboutnakhladog.htm

"

The Nakhla Dog
A Century of Conflict

Beheira is a region of rich farming land located in the middle of the Nile delta. Its densely populated and fertile landscape is dotted with mud huts and every other square inch is under intense cultivation with fields growing a wide variety of crops such as wheat and cotton as well as strawberries, okra and cucumbers. It is perhaps best known for its production of a fine variety of tobacco which is used in huqqah smoking.

On the 28th of June, 1911 at nine o'clock in the morning while standing in one of those fertile fields, a farmer by the name of Mohammed Ali Effendi Hakim observed something strange in the skies about his village of Denshal, near Nakhla (40 kilometers south-east of Alexandria). First he heard a "terrific" noise in his field and then looking up he saw that the sky had been streaked with a "fearful column" of white smoke. A dog, which had been there only moments before had been transformed into "ashes in the moment."

To be born a dog in the modern Middle East would not, I think it's a reasonable to say, be the luckiest thing in the world. That seems especially so in a country like Egypt where in ancient times dogs had been considered sacred (and were even mummified) but were now, at least since the advent of Islam, thought of as unclean and lowly creatures fit only for hunting and guard duty. But the fate of Hakim's dog would have to be considered an extremely unlucky case of being at the wrong place at exactly the wrong time.

Sometime before he crawled out from his resting and venturing out into Egyptian summer heat (that "sometime" being anything between 11 and 1,300 million years before) a massive meteor plummeted into the surface of the planet Mars. Its impact was so great that it launched into space several tons of Martian volcanic and sedimentary material.

nd-page-dog.jpg
nd-page-nakhla.jpg
nd-page-eqypt.jpg

This material went into orbit around the Sun where it collided with other rocks, broke into smaller particles and got bathed in cosmic radiation. At the time when the fragment of rock that later became known as the Nakhla meteorite broke away from the other material, Hakim's dog's wolf-like ancestors had only just diverged from their fox-like cousins (Mohammed Ali Effendi Hakim's ancestors meanwhile had not yet differentiated themselves from orangutans or gorillas).

It was said at the time that the death of the dog was the only fatality ever recorded for a meteorite. It was certainly this angle of the story that led the Egyptian newspaper El Ahali to send a reporter to Denshal to interview the farmer who showed him a greenish fragment covered in pitch. He said that numerous shards had plummeted to earth and buried themselves to depths of up to one meter. The news when it was translated into English prompted a few British scientists, who were residents of Egypt, to visit the strewnfield area. They succeeded in recovering about 10 kilograms of the meteorite.

Curiously, none of them visited Denshal or communicated any further with Hakim whose eyewitness account was the very first report of the event. John Ball of the Egyptian Survey Department stated that the meteorite would probably have been lost to science altogether "but for the action of a farmer, Mohammed Ali Effendi Hakim, who communicated a note of the occurrence to the Arabic Newspaper El Ahali." But after discussions via telegram with an official in Denshal, Ball concluded that the dog story was the likely "product of a lively imagination."

The debate continues today as to the verity of Hakim’s account and the existence of the dog but one can not escape its reference in virtually every major text and reference from The Catalog of Meteorites to NASA."

Hahahaha.....you say it as a joke but i begin to search in this area  for meteorite before a few months ago when i go a dog walk again but a Night walk.

So, 3-4 meters front of me in the trail, i saw suddenly a small red light (very small) to hit the ground  and after i hear a Noise. The next day i was going there but i didn't find anything. Have plants,  no metal detector ,etc. I believe is something very small.After some days they rain to much and the trail almost destroy it. The municipality they send a Machine to make the road again ....but thats how i start...

But before 15 days in the same trail  and 30  meters far away from the place i have see the red light (in the side where water moves rocks, etc) found this:

Its very small and light the half piece attract the magnet very powerful and the other side nothing.

The crust looks very new. They have spherical hondrules   but in this rock is black. You can see it in the photo around to white mineral i found inside where i scratched a little.

I did't found metallic iron , but i believe  maybe is more inside like a core. But the rock is very small , so i didn't make anything else and i leave it.

Also the rock i found today is only 6-7 far away from this one, not in the trail but inside a farmer fields.They have some there.

1.JPG

2.JPG

3.JPG

4.JPG

5.JPG

6.JPG

screenshot.png

Edited by ivigo
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Those strange spherical things are called chondrules. Chondrules and free metallic iron are how a suspect meteorite is identified.

Your rock has neither. Sorry.

Have someone teach your dog about these basic characteristics and he can tell you which rocks to bring home and obsess over.

:)

Hi Bob , you believe this rock is meteorite ? They have Chondrules and metallic iron, So is possible?

screen shot.png

Edited by ivigo
Link to post
Share on other sites

First one is full of vesicles and appears to be either slag or terrestrial volcanic.  Second one looks like slag.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ivigo said:

Hi Bob , you believe this rock is meteorite ? They have Chondrules and metallic iron, So is possible?

screen shot.png

Chondrules are spherical. That is not spherical, and is therefore not a chondrule.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ivigo said:

Hi Bob , you believe this rock is meteorite ? They have Chondrules and metallic iron, So is possible?

screen shot.png

No, I don't believe it is a meteorite. I don't see anything that resembles chondrules. But if that is free metallic iron you can't rule it out with a magnet and a streak test.

That is how field tests work. You can't identify a meteorite. You can only eliminate terrestrial rocks. If that is metallic iron then you can be sure it is not a terrestrial rock.

I would say you have refractory waste of some kind. Not a meteorite. It is full of silica and gas bubbles. Neither are present in meteorites and almost always present in slag. Slag often contains metal. So the specimen is most assuredly slag.

  • well done 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

No, I don't believe it is a meteorite. I don't see anything that resembles chondrules. But if that is free metallic iron you can't rule it out with a magnet and a streak test.

That is how field tests work. You can't identify a meteorite. You can only eliminate terrestrial rocks. If that is metallic iron then you can be sure it is not a terrestrial rock.

I would say you have refractory waste of some kind. Not a meteorite. It is full of silica and gas bubbles. Neither are present in meteorites and almost always present in slag. Slag often contains metal. So the specimen is most assuredly slag.

So, we solve the problem . They have inside 3-4 small pieces of metallic iron and 2  very small pieces in copper - gold color metal without any magnet attraction.

The streak color is light to dark grey depends from what part of rock you take the streak.A lot of bubbles.  

If was a meteorite (because of metallic iron) maybe is a mesosiderite. Now is history.

So, the second one was glassy all ,with a big bubble in the center. And the half of this one is history now.

When you have a very small pieces like this 2 rocks if you try to find answers so probably they need to destroy them.

Next....

 

Edited by ivigo
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The bubbles are from metal oxidizing. Oxygen does not exist in space. Neither do bubbles. Space is a vacuum.

The metal flecks are metal. Slag is from metal smelting or welding process and traps the metal.

The "shiny" glossy luster is oxides of silica. That is silica and oxygen. Neither of which exist in space. 

Silica is used to absorb oxygen when metal is melted. Slag is made of oxidized silica and metals.

Let's recap. Oxygen does not exist in space and your specimen is full of oxides. Bubbles do not form in a vacuum and your specimen is full of them. Silica is not present in meteorites and your sppecimen is almost entirely silica. Meteorites do not leave a streak and your specimen does. Your specimen has no fusion crust. Nor does it have any characteristics of a meteorite whatsoever.

On the other hand slag is oxidized silica and metals exactly like your specimen. Slag has gas bubbles from expanding gasses in a pressurized environment. So does your specimen. Slag leaves a streak of greys and reds. So does your specimen.Slag is very common stuff and looks EXACTLY like your specimen. 

You have a lump of slag. Common refractory waste. Nothing indicates that it is anything besides slag. It has no meteoritic characteristics at all. It looks exactly like slag. There is no indication that it is anything else but slag.

A simple assay will show that it is oxides of silica, aluminum, iron, copper and various other metals. We know oxidized elements do not come from space because there IS NO OXYGEN. The streak test proves the specimen is oxidized and therefore could not possibly be from space.

This is just basic mineral field observation my friend. Stuff they teach in high school or Boy Scouts. You need to learn the basics so you can throw rocks like these down when you pick them up.

You are spending time obsessing on common slag and trying to make a meteorite out of it. If you spent that time learning basic identification skills you could learn to actually recognize a possible meteorite.

  • Like 3
  • well done 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ivigo said:

 

download.jpg

Thank you, now listen to Bob's good advice and do some more research and study real examples in your hand, soon you will be on the right track. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, hardtimehermit said:

Thank you, now listen to Bob's good advice and do some more research and study real examples in your hand, soon you will be on the right track. 

Hi, trust me if they didn't have the metallic iron inside i will not  give any attention at all. And because it's a small rock i try hard to make as little damage is possible.

At the begging as already have  write i was not sure if is meteorite   even if he had metallic iron inside.

Thank to all for help.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...