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Was able to take advantage of a cooler day and got back into Truck wash with the gold monster. Have hit the area pretty hard with the 5000 and thought I would go crumb chasing today. Got 4 at .3 gram.  3 out of the washes and one from the hillside. Did some scraping on the hill side but no more. This place is infested with iron stone from 1/8" to 10". Had to go into disc some times just to try and keep it half way quite. 

It was just good to get out finally, but boy, I can tell I have not been detecting in a while. Will probably feel it even more tomorrow! 

There were a lot of these blister beetles out also. Guess they can leave a painful blister if you play with them. 

Tom H. 

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Four dinks is better than no dinks.  :)  WTG.

Yep, I remember seeing those beetles last year.  Their color alone says "don't touch".

Glad you made it out....  and back safely.

 

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Posted (edited)

Nice! I'd happily take a day like that.:-)

Jim

Edited by Idaho Jim
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Congrats. Nice ones. I'm sure there's a big one with your name on it someplace in that area.

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3 hours ago, Morlock said:

Congrats. Nice ones. I'm sure there's a big one with your name on it someplace in that area.

Morlok:  Thanks. Im happy just to find a couple of dinks now and then.  I have gotten LOTS of gold out of that area and am not driven by the "I got to find a big one" anymore. 

This is from one of the washes close by.  Over 4 oz. total over the years from Pizza nugget wash. Named after the big flat one. :) 

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Good on you Tom... A very interesting area over there..I took Mrs Boulder dash for a hike back in there last month.. I wasn't detecting but flower gazing.. I couldn't help but notice some new areas exposed from the floods..Bet there's lots more over there.

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2 hours ago, boulder dash said:

Good on you Tom... A very interesting area over there..I took Mrs Boulder dash for a hike back in there last month.. I wasn't detecting but flower gazing.. I couldn't help but notice some new areas exposed from the floods..Bet there's lots more over there.

Yeah Wade, that area is quite steep and it does change a lot every time it floods.  I wish that I could get up in there again but I guess that's out with the condition of my legs and back.  But what's this 'Flower Gazing' thing?  Are you turning into a 'Ferdinand the Bull'? He got into trouble stopping to smell the flowers, always bring your beeper with you.  :black_knight_standing:

   Old Tom

  

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, boulder dash said:

Good on you Tom... A very interesting area over there..I took Mrs Boulder dash for a hike back in there last month.. I wasn't detecting but flower gazing.. I couldn't help but notice some new areas exposed from the floods..Bet there's lots more over there.

BD. yes, the flood last year really did a number on that area. In the main wash in some areas it took out 4 feet of overburden. When I went in last week, the lower stretches of the main wash had running water in them. I have never seen that before. I was looking at all the water and drove right past Owl wash! :idunno:

Tom H.

 

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Have a friend with a large ranch in Arizona that was bringing alfalfa in to our area to sell as feed. He was sued because the alfalfa killed several horses. It was determined that the hay had blister beetles in it that is what killed the horses.

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Blister beetles kill a lot of livestock. Horses in particular are susceptible. Even just dried portions of the beetle's body can cause serious reactions and death.

Southeast Arizona and the Sulfur Springs valley in particular are a hot spot for the blister beetle. When alfalfa hay got pricey about 10 years ago I stopped by a grower in Soldier's Hole and asked how he was selling his hay despite the beetle infestation. His response - California. Seems the price of hay was even higher there than in Arizona and desperate horse folk were willing to pay half price for bad hay. Eventually notices went up all over California warning about bad Arizona hay. Kinda screwed the pooch for responsible Arizona hay producers for quite a while.

Sometimes you get what you pay for. A critical aspect of animal husbandry is knowing how to buy good feed. Most recreational horse owners just don't have the knowledge to inspect hay or even grain. Bag hay is about the only way to get around that lack of knowledge but man is that stuff pricey.

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I have raised horses for a number of years and I never heard of giving bad hay to a horse.  You just can't do it, you'll wind up vetting them and spending all night walking and babysitting them if they don't colic and die.  Ask 'TomH' about walking horses all night, he's very familiar with that.  As far as the Blister beetle goes I never heard of them until I went beeping and asked just what the heck they were.  By then I gave up horses as the kids were all gone and they were too tough for me at my age.  I wonder just how it would feel if you got stung or bitten by one.  Is it like a bee or scorpion sting?  I hear about the blister part and that would be enough to be wary of them.  Has any one of us gotten traumatized by one of them boogers?  

   Old Tom 

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Tom you probably actually rode your horses. A lot of these "modern" horse folk don't ride them - that would be cruel. Fat out of shape bored horses. Fat out of shape poser owners. Not a happy horse or owner in the bunch. Price of hay goes over budget it's the horse that doesn't get a choice on what's for dinner. Besides in California if your horse dies you sue. Horse expense solved and another Toyota in the garage from the settlement money. The lawyer got a new Mercedes. Life is good.

These particular blister beetles are known as Iron Cross Beetles. I don't think they bite or sting but they don't really need that sort of defense. They ooze cantharidin toxin out of their bodies when endangered. Cantharidin is deadly to humans and most animals. Just a tiny bit of this toxin, which is found throughout their bodies, is enough to start a strong toxic blister reaction.

Pick one up and you will be swearing, crush one in your hand and you will probably be vomiting while you scream.

You are probably old enough to remember Spanish Fly? That was made from a watered down version of dried blister beetle cantharidin toxin.

Bad juju all the way 'round..

Edited by clay
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3 hours ago, Old Tom said:

I have raised horses for a number of years and I never heard of giving bad hay to a horse.  You just can't do it, you'll wind up vetting them and spending all night walking and babysitting them if they don't colic and die.  Ask 'TomH' about walking horses all night, he's very familiar with that.  As far as the Blister beetle goes I never heard of them until I went beeping and asked just what the heck they were.  By then I gave up horses as the kids were all gone and they were too tough for me at my age.  I wonder just how it would feel if you got stung or bitten by one.  Is it like a bee or scorpion sting?  I hear about the blister part and that would be enough to be wary of them.  Has any one of us gotten traumatized by one of them boogers?  

   Old Tom 

Yah...I remember walking the horses to keep them up and get their guts pooping again way into the night. I guess I was cheaper then a horse walking machine. :)
Tom H.

 

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1 hour ago, clay said:

Tom you probably actually rode your horses. A lot of these "modern" horse folk don't ride them - that would be cruel. Fat out of shape bored horses. Fat out of shape poser owners. Not a happy horse or owner in the bunch. Price of hay goes over budget it's the horse that doesn't get a choice on what's for dinner. Besides in California if your horse dies you sue. Horse expense solved and another Toyota in the garage from the settlement money. The lawyer got a new Mercedes. Life is good.

These particular blister beetles are known as Iron Cross Beetles. I don't think they bite or sting but they don't really need that sort of defense. They ooze cantharidin toxin out of their bodies when endangered. Cantharidin is deadly to humans and most animals. Just a tiny bit of this toxin, which is found throughout their bodies, is enough to start a strong toxic blister reaction.

Pick one up and you will be swearing, crush one in your hand and you will probably be vomiting while you scream.

You are probably old enough to remember Spanish Fly? That was made from a watered down version of dried blister beetle cantharidin toxin.

Bad juju all the way 'round..

We rode the heck out of them. This was back in the 70s. The desert was our play ground back then. Lots of open land around our house. 

Tom H. 

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Blister beetles are no worse than the seasonal flu. Nothing to worry about at all. Just a bunch of fear mongering and hand wringing.

The toxin is no worse than many household cleaners you keep under your sink. There is no reason for concern. The facts about these beetles are being inflated by the media to spread panic in the population.

Most people could eat a hand full of those beetles and have no symptoms. They are only a concern for the elderly and people with underlying conditions.

The experts say that the increase in the yearly numbers of death by insects won't even be noticeable. So don't be afraid to pick one up in your hand and squeeze it. They really aren't that dangerous at all!

:25r30wi:

 

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Well I'm not going to squeeze any Blister Beetle but where do you get that Spanish Fly, I do need some?  :ya:

   Old Tom

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23 hours ago, clay said:

You are probably old enough to remember Spanish Fly? That was made from a watered down version of dried blister beetle cantharidin toxin.

Yep, Clay, I remember that Spanish Fly...Supposed to drive the womens wild, At least the one's it didn''t kill or disfigure...Have to admit I spent a bit of energy trying to find some.When in high school.........Cheers, Unc

 

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