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Asteroid missed Earth by 4350 miles May 4


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Posted (edited)

Near Earth Asteroid 2020 JJ was only discovered yesterday, May 4th, within a few hours of closest approach only missing Earth by 4350 miles. Asteroid 2020 JJ is only 13 feet in spherical diameter. It could be seen over the Arizona at 11.7+ magnitude for about thirty minutes yesterday. It would have left a few tons of meteorites over a strewnfield had it entered the atmosphere.  It was one of about seven spotted NEO asteroids that passed closer than the Moon in the last two weeks. Another 45 which pass closer than 20 lunar distances in the next few weeks are listed at spaceweather.com . Last week another NEO asteroid 1.25 miles in diameter passed 3,900,000 miles from Earth visible for about a week at magnitude 10.7+.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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Yeah, that was a close call, but it was only 13 feet wide. Wouldn’t have been a planet killer, but would have caused some local devastation wherever it landed.

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Three of the others that passed between the Earth and the Moon this week were Asteroid 2020 JG at 79 feet in spherical diameter missing at just 143,000 miles, Asteroid 2020 JA at 43 feet in spherical diameter also missing at just 143,000 miles,m and Asteroid 2020 JN at 40 feet in spherical diameter missing at just 166,000 miles. At these distances the rate is one in 1300 will hit the Earth. I guess we've got 1297 more to go.

Cheers!

billpeters

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Morlock said:

Interesting theory,  and certainly a plausible one about how an airburst can occur without leaving any material behind.  But I would think that an airburst and the resulting shock waves from a low pass object described in this article would have caused a more linear blast zone over a long distance at the Tunguska site.  Evidence at the site including the fallen trees being oriented in a radial pattern show that it was a localized blast zone around a central point, not a linear one.

This article has some good information about it as well:

https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/tunguska-100-years-and-counting/

One thing for sure, there will certainly be new meteorites and strewn fields, as well as airburst events like this coming to us the future!

Edited by GotAU?
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1 hour ago, billpeters said:

Three of the others that passed between the Earth and the Moon this week were Asteroid 2020 JG at 79 feet in spherical diameter missing at just 143,000 miles, Asteroid 2020 JA at 43 feet in spherical diameter also missing at just 143,000 miles,m and Asteroid 2020 JN at 40 feet in spherical diameter missing at just 166,000 miles. At these distances the rate is one in 1300 will hit the Earth. I guess we've got 1297 more to go.

Cheers!

billpeters

I

 

36 minutes ago, GotAU? said:

Interesting theory,  and certainly a plausible one about how an airburst can occur without leaving any material behind.  But I would think that an airburst and the resulting shock waves from a low pass object described in this article would have caused a more linear blast zone over a long distance at the Tunguska site.  Evidence at the site including the fallen trees being oriented in a radial pattern show that it was a localized blast zone around a central point, not a linear one.

This article has some good information about it as well:

https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/tunguska-100-years-and-counting/

One thing for sure, there will certainly be new meteorites and strewn fields, as well as airburst events like this coming to us the future!

Given the fact that 70% of the Earth is covered by oceans, I wonder how many other tunguska type events have happened that we don't know about? 

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1 hour ago, Morlock said:

I

 

Given the fact that 70% of the Earth is covered by oceans, I wonder how many other tunguska type events have happened that we don't know about? 

0 since they started monitoring the atmosphere for atomic bomb testing.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Mikestang said:

0 since they started monitoring the atmosphere for atomic bomb testing.

It’s wasn’t a 5 kiloton event like the Tunguska event, but  actually, we missed detecting at least 1 large (173 kilotons) event on December 18, 2018, described as having a size of about 33 feet (10 meters) wide and weighing about 1,500 tons...

https://www.space.com/bering-sea-fireball-satellite-photos.html

I love this closeup of it captured by satellite:

456AC5BB-569C-4A14-9CE2-F1F822197A12.gif

Edited by GotAU?
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There have to be some military data collectors out there that could show more than we see now.

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