Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 62
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Ivigo, As an Administrator here let me welcome you to the forum. Our members are not here to prove to you or anyone from their knowledge and experience that what is posted not a meteorite, t

Ivigo,                      Sympathy is extended to you because of your geographical dilemma, and your persistence is laudable, but your random selection and process of elimination method is an e

Ivigo, Tektites are not meteorites. They are excavated by region destroying impacts that create many kilometer-wide craters millions of years ago. The massive impact excavates Earth's bedrock whi

Posted Images

Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

You can make it as easy or as complicated as you want to.

If your sample does not have free metallic iron it is NOT a meteorite. That is very easy to test for.

All meteorites (with very few exceptions) have free metallic iron. No terrestrial rocks (with very few exceptions) have free metallic iron.  That is the first test that every meteorite hunter on the planet uses to separate terrestrial stones from meteorites.

You should use that method too! 

Hi Bedrock Bob,

I understand what you write and i am not against you. For sure your knowledge is far away from mine. But  all the knowledge we have some time is not enough.   For this reason we are going forward in many things ....and we don't stay frozen with what already knows.

Really i don't say i have right but if i have something unusual i will try hard to find what is. An if anyone they didn't give a good explanation i will try more hard. 

It's simple...

I give the example with the Greek ancient computer ( made B.C ) because this technologies discovered after a 1000 years ago.  So, never say never like James Bond movie. Or like my paper &  textile musical instruments i make.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antikythera_mechanism

Edited by ivigo
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 4/16/2020 at 1:32 PM, ivigo said:

Sorry to ask, but how many regmaglypts you see in this 2 meteorite? 

The second the lunar one look like mine rock....

Also everything is not the same at anytime , the melting , the fusion crust and  regmaglypts in meteor stone depends from the input angle and the speed when it enters the atmosphere, as well as our own space vehicles.

IMG_2081.jpg

2c683a1803a6b96b3ee3fa5e2282a1ac.jpg

Again Ivigo,

If the second rock really had a glassy chip on the upper left corner it could not be a meteorite. There is some question of the accuracy of the universavvy.com and pinterest identification of this second rock. I would like to confirm that it is actually a lunar with a Meteoritical Bulletin listing and picture source. The top picture looks like a store bought meteorite. Again, neither meteorite above has any regmaglypts. None of your rocks have any regmaglypts. All of your rocks are terrestrial. And no, the second rock is nothing like your rock.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
accuracy
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, billpeters said:

Again Ivigo,

If the second rock really had a glassy chip on the upper left corner it could not be a meteorite. There is some question of the accuracy of the universavvy.com and pinterest identification of this second rock. I would like to confirm that it is actually a lunar with a Meteoritical Bulletin listing and picture source. The top picture looks like a store bought meteorite. Again, neither meteorite above has any regmaglypts. None of your rocks have any regmaglypts. All of your rocks are terrestrial. And no, the second rock is nothing like your rock.

billpeters

Hi, i am stupid and i ask, why after a meteorite crash , in the crash area we found tektite? Is glassy or not? So, why the impact point in meteorite is not possible to be glassy? Yes i agree about the question for the second rock .The top maybe. My rock have more regmaglypts from the second rock. Also why always write no crystals in meteorite. Pallasite meteorite have olivine and other crystals. And many, many other meteorite have crystals and almost all of them micro and nano crystals. This second rock looks full in olivine . Ok , my rock and this second one maybe is not brother but is from the same city ,etc. 

I don't understand why you are so absolute about whether he is a meteorite or not. I begin to believe that you are one of those who send them to earth, hahahaha....

I will ask you something more , not for my rock but general. If any meteorite is in Earth thousand or million years under all Earth situation , rain, water, etc, how is possible to looks?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

This 3 is some of the most expensive meteorite.

The surface is exactly the same with second rock and no regmaglypts.  (first)

And the second one looks absolutely with a terrestrial rock with holes and no remgmaglypts also. 

The third one looks like serpentine and yes is crystals... surprise no iron... 

9. The Main Mass of Zagami Meteorite - €278,000

The Zagami meteorite crystallised from basaltic magma around 175 million years ago and to date it is the largest Mars meteorite discovered on Earth. In 1962, a farmer in Zagami, Nigeria was almost struck by this big meteorite when it came crashing down. A portion of the mass was offered up for sale and has a value of more than €278,000.

2. The Main Mass of the Brenham Meteorite - €896,000+

This ‘iron-lace’ pallasite meteorite weighs in at half a tonne and is valued at €896,000. The rock is shaped like a shield and was found in Kansas in 2005. The pleasure of owning a meteorite lies in the romance of having something that is not from earth itself and that could be one the oldest things in the universe.

6. The Zagami Martian Meteorite - €383,000

The Zagami Martian meteor landed in Nigeria in 1962. The largest piece of the meteorite came up for sale in 2006, and before it was even sold, planetariums from all of the world begged future buyers to make it available to them on loan.

and one glassy meteorite and looks similar with the 2 glassy point in second rock.

44205-c3936e16dea569e327f1174895175ef9176096b4-story_inline_image.png

44197-4d550f21fe260932f66bdb6a4aabb99cd33c119f-story_inline_image.jpg

44211-f797436fb55c2ae045f09b7a6054949923389a66-story_inline_image.png

unnamed.jpg

Edited by ivigo
Link to post
Share on other sites

There has not been a tektite forming impact in thousands of years, it is unlikely you are finding tektites.

Glass is formed by melting, meteorites do not melt.

Meteorites do not last millions of years on Earth.  The hardiest irons can last thousands, but chondrites terrestrialize much more quickly.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Mikestang said:

That doesn't look like a meteorite to me, and the website the pict is from isn't exactly the metbul.  There's no information on that page provided for that photo other than their claim that it's "a meteorite"; I don't think it is.

 

Their "picture" of a "meteor shower" is computer generated.

 

They have another pict further down that page stating "a meteorite" that I also doubt (little round black one).

 

And below that they show an iron meteorite with the caption "Regmaglypts Visible on an Iron Meteorite", except that it's a piece of shrapnel and there are no regmaglypts present.

 

Just because it's a webpage doesn't mean it's good or accurate information.

Yeah, it didn't look like a meteorite to.me either but I relied on the article to provide credible, accurate information. But It's possible there are exceptions to everything. I'm not an expert in any sense of the word.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, ivigo said:

Hi, i am stupid and i ask, why after a meteorite crash , in the crash area we found tektite? Is glassy or not? So, why the impact point in meteorite is not possible to be glassy?

Ivigo,

Tektites are not meteorites. They are excavated by region destroying impacts that create many kilometer-wide craters millions of years ago. The massive impact excavates Earth's bedrock which is turned into glassy tektites in the atmosphere before falling back to Earth. Tektites are found in great quantities in Moldova, Libyan Sahara, Southeast Asia and other places on Earth. There have been no meteorites found that have been associated with tektites.

Pallasites, like the Brenham Meteorite, are filled with olivine crystals surrounded by an iron nickel matrix. Nano-crystals are found in meteorites, but the quartz-like crystal structures in your rocks do not occur in meteorites.

Most found meteorites have been here for thousands of years and are recognizable. After recent millions of years meteorites degrade, but occasionally keep characteristics of their otherworldly composition.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, ivigo said:

Hi Bedrock Bob,

I understand what you write and i am not against you. For sure your knowledge is far away from mine. But  all the knowledge we have some time is not enough.   For this reason we are going forward in many things ....and we don't stay frozen with what already knows.

Really i don't say i have right but if i have something unusual i will try hard to find what is. An if anyone they didn't give a good explanation i will try more hard. 

It's simple...

I give the example with the Greek ancient computer ( made B.C ) because this technologies discovered after a 1000 years ago.  So, never say never like James Bond movie. Or like my paper &  textile musical instruments i make.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antikythera_mechanism

Ivigo,                     

Sympathy is extended to you because of your geographical dilemma, and your persistence is laudable, but your random selection and process of elimination method is an exercise in futility. 

Einstein had to invent new mathematics but ultimately was successful in reaching his goal, partial because he never gave up and partially because he looked at the world of physics and mathematics through a different lens. Don Quixote, on the other hand, lacked vision. Literally. Even though he was willing, "To fight with his last ounce of courage to reach the unreachable star,”  it was an idealistic pursuit. He might have reached his star if he'd had a good pair of glasses and was willing to wear them. Unless you choose to apply a valid method of meteorite identification, and search in an area where  space rocks have been known to fall, the odds of you succeeding in finding your "star" would appear to be more than astronomical . . .

FACT: "The Serres meteorite, (Ordinary chondrite, black - H4) Fell, June 1818;  weight: 8.5 kg found near  the town of Serres in northern Greece, is the only known meteorite object to crash on Greek soil, over two centuries ago, and as you probably know, is on display in the Athenian Museum. Reports are that this large meteorite broke up. Research would appear to be necessary and possibly helpful,  for a successful find.

 LOCATION RESEARCH:  Buy a good metal detector and consider the possibility of the existence of other space rocks or fragments being in the same general area where this one was found. More common "iron" meteorites might be found as well. Who knows? The location might not be discoverable, but pin down the location if possible. "Exact data about the circumstances of the fall are not known. But, in 1844 the main mass of the meteorite ended up in the Natural History Museum in Vienna. According to historical data, the stone was donated by the regional governor of Serres, the Ottoman Yusuf-Pasha to his physician. The physician brought the two fragments to Vienna and gave them to his former teacher, an Austrian chemist and botanist Johann Andreas Ritter von Scherer.  Scherer donated the meteorite to the NHM in Vienna"

HISTORICAL/ARCHIVAL RESEARCH:

Get Creative with your research; internet, Google Earth Pro, libraries, universities etc. 

"Meteorite records in the ancient Greek and Latin literature: between history and myth"

A catalog of citations related to possible meteorites has been assembled by searching the ancient Greek and Latin literature up to the end of the West Roman Empire (ad 476). The catalogue illustrates the attitude of ancient populations towards the fall of meteorites and extends the record of meteorite falls back in time.

The citations are arranged in the catalogue as: i) ‘meteorite falls’, when both the locality and the date of the fall are, at least approximately, indicated; ii) ‘worshiped stones’, when the written and archaeological sources suggest the actual existence of a stone as an object of worship, but the information about the locality and the date of the fall are missing or vague; iii) ‘myths’, when the connection between an object said to have fallen from the heaven and the fall of a meteorite is weak or obscured by mythological traditions.

Ivigo, Instead of "Tilting at Windmills" or searching for the Holy Grail, how exciting would it be if you were to find the second documented meteorite in the history of your country? They may be an ancient fall out there somewhere, and not yet discovered.

Good Luck and good hunting!

Note: The shown photo of the light colored meteorite was inserted in a web site and was also purported to be the Serres. The dark colored photo was obtained from a separate site. 

 

 

 

METEORITE.PNG

DARK METEORITE.PNG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, BMc said:

Ivigo,                     

Sympathy is extended to you because of your geographical dilemma, and your persistence is laudable, but your random selection and process of elimination method is an exercise in futility. 

Einstein had to invent new mathematics but ultimately was successful in reaching his goal, partial because he never gave up and partially because he looked at the world of physics and mathematics through a different lens. Don Quixote, on the other hand, lacked vision. Literally. Even though he was willing, "To fight with his last ounce of courage to reach the unreachable star,”  it was an idealistic pursuit. He might have reached his star if he'd had a good pair of glasses and was willing to wear them. Unless you choose to apply a valid method of meteorite identification, and search in an area where  space rocks have been known to fall, the odds of you succeeding in finding your "star" would appear to be more than astronomical . . .

FACT: "The Serres meteorite, (Ordinary chondrite, black - H4) Fell, June 1818;  weight: 8.5 kg found near  the town of Serres in northern Greece, is the only known meteorite object to crash on Greek soil, over two centuries ago, and as you probably know, is on display in the Athenian Museum. Reports are that this large meteorite broke up. Research would appear to be necessary and possibly helpful,  for a successful find.

 LOCATION RESEARCH:  Buy a good metal detector and consider the possibility of the existence of other space rocks or fragments being in the same general area where this one was found. More common "iron" meteorites might be found as well. Who knows? The location might not be discoverable, but pin down the location if possible. "Exact data about the circumstances of the fall are not known. But, in 1844 the main mass of the meteorite ended up in the Natural History Museum in Vienna. According to historical data, the stone was donated by the regional governor of Serres, the Ottoman Yusuf-Pasha to his physician. The physician brought the two fragments to Vienna and gave them to his former teacher, an Austrian chemist and botanist Johann Andreas Ritter von Scherer.  Scherer donated the meteorite to the NHM in Vienna"

HISTORICAL/ARCHIVAL RESEARCH:

Get Creative with your research; internet, Google Earth Pro, libraries, universities etc. 

"Meteorite records in the ancient Greek and Latin literature: between history and myth"

A catalog of citations related to possible meteorites has been assembled by searching the ancient Greek and Latin literature up to the end of the West Roman Empire (ad 476). The catalogue illustrates the attitude of ancient populations towards the fall of meteorites and extends the record of meteorite falls back in time.

The citations are arranged in the catalogue as: i) ‘meteorite falls’, when both the locality and the date of the fall are, at least approximately, indicated; ii) ‘worshiped stones’, when the written and archaeological sources suggest the actual existence of a stone as an object of worship, but the information about the locality and the date of the fall are missing or vague; iii) ‘myths’, when the connection between an object said to have fallen from the heaven and the fall of a meteorite is weak or obscured by mythological traditions.

Ivigo, Instead of "Tilting at Windmills" or searching for the Holy Grail, how exciting would it be if you were to find the second documented meteorite in the history of your country? They may be an ancient fall out there somewhere, and not yet discovered.

Good Luck and good hunting!

Note: The shown photo of the light colored meteorite was inserted in a web site and was also purported to be the Serres. The dark colored photo was obtained from a separate site. 

 

 

 

METEORITE.PNG

DARK METEORITE.PNG

I am only 200 klm far away not too much. Look this is my hobby and really i am very good to find interest things. Not only rocks but many other things.

The hobby for meteorite is new here in Greece because the most of people searching for treasure.  It's possible to find anywhere something. The last thing i collected with my dog is a piece of male ring half gold half copper and in the middle little iron maybe have something there ,gem or something else.  But the searching is illegal, especially with metal detector.

Thank you for your reply.

Edited by ivigo
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are looking for meteorites a magnet is a better choice than a detector. The only time that might not be true is in a strewn field with iron meteorites.

Many, if not most meteorites don't give a very good response on a detector. Most will be attracted to a magnet.

The tried and true method to locate meteorites are by using a magnet on a stick. Then you eliminate all that do not have free metallic iron.

No use trying to re invent the wheel. The best way to find a meteorite is to use a magnet and then eliminate terrestrial stones from suspect stones. That is best accomplished by doing a simple streak test.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

If you are looking for meteorites a magnet is a better choice than a detector. The only time that might not be true is in a strewn field with iron meteorites.

Many, if not most meteorites don't give a very good response on a detector. Most will be attracted to a magnet.

The tried and true method to locate meteorites are by using a magnet on a stick. Then you eliminate all that do not have free metallic iron.

No use trying to re invent the wheel. The best way to find a meteorite is to use a magnet and then eliminate terrestrial stones from suspect stones. That is best accomplished by doing a simple streak test.

Hi Bob and the thank you for advice, i appreciate it. I know how to search  about iron and iron stone meteorite but this meteorite is easy for intedification.  The unusual rocks is the problem. With iron without to be magnetite of hematite or something similar with crash point ,etc.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

And i will come back in this rock.

I am sure the most here you believe is a basaltic terrestrial rock. Maybe you have Right.

But i am very sure for the impact crash and melting rock.

Also i am sure the outside black color is crust.( new photos tomorrow). 

 I followed your advice and i did more tests with what I have available. 

So i make better hardness and streak test.

They scratch class very easy, knife not scratch it but quartz scratch it .So is somewhere to 6-6,5. 

The streak is white to gray.

The strange is that, the half of the rock (with impact point) they attract magnet(not strong but good enough), the other half is not attract magnet.

And all the rock looks same.

I am sure is not a iron or iron meteorite......but i am not sure that is a terrestrial rock. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...