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3 hours ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

To entertain you, I found something( my speling:barnie:was wrong for conchoidal(fractures like glass))

 

conchoidal fracture basalt

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=conchoidal+fracture+basalt&t=samsung&ia=images&iax=images

Hi, thank you for your time you spend for this. 

Already i know about all that and this is the reason when i found the rock i make a mistake to believe that was obsidian or something similar , as I have already written at the beginning of the post.

But as you can see better in my rock the impact is not crack and missing piece  like other rock i have found or the link you send me but is melting and getting inside  the shock wave of the collision and the direction it has is evident in the melting of the rock. 

For me, that was the reason I thought it wasn't just a simple rock. Plus to that very strange is the spherical micro crystals  created by pressure and temperatures at the point of impact on the rock.

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Ivigo, As an Administrator here let me welcome you to the forum. Our members are not here to prove to you or anyone from their knowledge and experience that what is posted not a meteorite, t

Ivigo,                      Sympathy is extended to you because of your geographical dilemma, and your persistence is laudable, but your random selection and process of elimination method is an e

Ivigo, Tektites are not meteorites. They are excavated by region destroying impacts that create many kilometer-wide craters millions of years ago. The massive impact excavates Earth's bedrock whi

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Posted (edited)

OK, thanks to all for your answers .

I know the rock It does not have all the characteristics of a meteorite and most likely it is not a meteorite. (But this is the exciting, to find things that can not be exist)

But the strange features it has and especially at the point of impact no one explained satisfactorily. 

For the above reason, the specialist (collaborate with NASA ) at the geological institute asked me to send him the specific sample to do further tests.

When the virus crisis stop and everything works again maybe we have unusual news. 

So, when i have news from examination i we write back to inform you.

Thanks again 

Now is time for treasure hunting.....hahahaha 

 

 

Edited by ivigo
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Posted (edited)

Please look at it in zoom but out of site, the site zoom is not big ....i polish this piece but is very difficult because is very hard stone (8-9) it made all from microcrystalls  (green, blue, red, purple, etc). No color strike.

Meteorite or not , is a very interesting rock  if you cut it into very thin slices or for gemstones cut.

P1010001.JPG

P1010006.JPG

Edited by ivigo
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It is a high silica volcanic rock. The crystallization is too coarse for obsidian. My guess it is a basalt similar to bassinite.

It is pretty common stuff. Lots of carvings and statues are made from material like this. Definitely not a gemstone. More like construction material.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for you answer but always someone say looks with something, but i didn't see at all  any photo with something similar.

Is not obsidian i have many of them.  And is not a basalt , we are have here a lot of volcano rocks .  

Photos please with something similar. Other way you make wrong..

You write me bassinite.....where you see any similarity? and the density of my rock is 8 to 9 .....

We are try to find something for this rock , but the most of the person here is negative with out answers or evidence .  I am not expert but i know if someone say something negative they need to prove it with something and not only to say it. 

It is very easy to me also to be negative in other post , but they need to prove why..

All the meteorite is not a iron meteorite and the iron is not only in magnetite ....spinal, olivine  and many other minerals have iron inside...in meteorite

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, hardtimehermit said:

Absolutely not a meteorite, please post in rock and mineral to find out more information.  

Prove why is not? Because you never see one like this? Or because you have see an earth rock like this? You know some times always something new is out there....

Edited by ivigo
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Sorry but you are very negative people here. Experts means not only to know why something is not a meteorite for what you know and see in photo and you learn about meteorite but to prove why is not a meteorite with some evidence. Many strange and unusual things is out there and you never knows what is from Earth or outer space. 

I know i believe everything about meteorite (what is the fact) so, i am expert, but when i found something unusual , what i am if i don't know what is?

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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

Not a meteorite.  No one is being negative telling you that.

So, what is not meteorite?  We are make a conversation.

They have  remaglyphts small and some big  but they have, they have a very thin melt fusion crust, thin but is there, also is very heavy, they have also  an impact melt point, they attract magnet, no colored streak,   ok no iron but also no magnetite, very hard density, unusual microcrystals, no obsidian, no basalt, etc....so except the metal iron...what other make this rock no meteorite?

 http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/reu/reu2006/sweet.pdf

https://www.cefns.nau.edu/geology/naml/Meteorite/Angrite.html

 

Edited by ivigo
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It does not have regmaglypts, nor does it have fusion crust.  It's "iron stone", some sort of metamorphic terrestrial rock.

Not sure what conversation there is to be made, you asked for opinions, which were all unanimous, and then you refused to accept what anyone said; that is not a discussion.

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13 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

It does not have regmaglypts, nor does it have fusion crust.  It's "iron stone", some sort of metamorphic terrestrial rock.

Not sure what conversation there is to be made, you asked for opinions, which were all unanimous, and then you refused to accept what anyone said; that is not a discussion.

Sorry but you have see the photos in full analysis? No here , in your PC? 

Also sorry but this rock is same thousand maybe million years now and i believe it never change.

I believe is achondrite meteorite with iron in spinel and olivine they need to read about it.

The rock have hundreds maybe  thousand regmaglypts and fusion crust and if you see more careful this rock is under water for long time. 

 

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

Nope.com

Sorry to ask, but how many regmaglypts you see in this 2 meteorite? 

The second the lunar one look like mine rock....

Also everything is not the same at anytime , the melting , the fusion crust and  regmaglypts in meteor stone depends from the input angle and the speed when it enters the atmosphere, as well as our own space vehicles.

IMG_2081.jpg

2c683a1803a6b96b3ee3fa5e2282a1ac.jpg

Edited by ivigo
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Of course not. The is nothing close to regmaglypts on any of your rocks. The vast majority of meteorites do not  have any regmaglypts. A meteorite the size of your rocks would only hit the ground at a slow terminal velocity of about 250 km per hour. It would be about the same of taking a single engine plane up and dropping a bowling ball. The ball would hit the ground at about 250 kph, probably break, make a dent in the ground, but would not make a crater. Your rocks would slow to the same terminal velocity. As been told to you before there is no fusion crust, but only common terrestrial weathering.

There is no such thing as melt impact on the rock from a meteorite hitting the ground. It does not exist. The weathered conchoidal fracture of your rock could only form from laying on the ground for many millennium.

The conchoidal fracture of your rock in not a characteristic of meteorite breakage, but is is a frequent characteristic of terrestrial rocks. Meteorites do not form conchoidal fractures like your rock as they are not crystalline or glassy. Chondrites are not crystals. Your crystal spherical interior is proof it is not a meteorite. Meteorites do not have spheroidal crystals.

Your second rock above looks like it has a glassy chip on the upper left. It cannot be a lunar meteorite much less a meteorite.

"You cannot make a pig's ear into a silk purse". Meaning: "There is no way you can turn a terrestrial rock into a meteorite".

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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I believe thats conchoidal fracturing as well as smoothing by water errosion. Here are some pictures I found that may help. I also believe as you about proving with as much as possible instead of cracking jokes at your expense. If you believe it to be the real deal, the only way to do so is by sending it to a lab for an Xrd or what not. This is on obsidian but its a clam shaped fracture.

conchoidal.jpg

conchoidal-fracture-obsidian-glossary.jpg

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2 hours ago, Morlock said:

A meteorite.

hahaha....except the iron meteorite and stone iron meteorite everything else is very confused .  

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1 hour ago, ivigo said:

hahaha....except the iron meteorite and stone iron meteorite everything else is very confused .  

It is very simple. Any stone that contains free metallic iron (not mineral iron) is a possible meteorite. Any stone that contains chondrules is a possible meteorite. 

If any stone does not contain free metallic iron it is NOT a meteorite. 

It is just that simple.

Look for free metallic iron and chondrules. If your stone does not have them then toss it!

Iron meteorites are very difficult to identify. They look just like hunks of man made iron. Stony irons are often tough to identify for the same reasons.

But stony meteorites like chondrite are fairly easy to identify. The flecks of free metallic iron and chondrules are unique and dont appear anywhere on earth. 

All you need to do is find rocks that stick to magnets. Then do a streak test and look in the window you ground. It is just that easy.

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

It is very simple. Any stone that contains free metallic iron (not mineral iron) is a possible meteorite. Any stone that contains chondrules is a possible meteorite. 

If any stone does not contain free metallic iron it is NOT a meteorite. 

It is just that simple.

Look for free metallic iron and chondrules. If your stone does not have them then toss it!

Iron meteorites are very difficult to identify. They look just like hunks of man made iron. Stony irons are often tough to identify for the same reasons.

But stony meteorites like chondrite are fairly easy to identify. The flecks of free metallic iron and chondrules are unique and dont appear anywhere on earth. 

All you need to do is find rocks that stick to magnets. Then do a streak test and look in the window you ground. It is just that easy.

Ok so how you explain the above photo , is not mine and is meteorite very extremely similar to my rock. Anchorite type with iron maybe...something new because always something new discovered ...what....is fake?  .... iron in crystals?  I don't say you don't have right....we are found out there some thousand meteorite and maybe they are millions , maybe billions out there ....and the Earth is not always the same .... so you don't be sure what you find , like fossils,  or archaeological things , like the ancient  computer of antikythera in Greece....and many other things.

And really nothing is simple , maybe you don't have see all meteorite photo. Many of them without fusion crust, regmaglypts, many of them without identifications, etc.

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You can make it as easy or as complicated as you want to.

If your sample does not have free metallic iron it is NOT a meteorite. That is very easy to test for.

All meteorites (with very few exceptions) have free metallic iron. No terrestrial rocks (with very few exceptions) have free metallic iron.  That is the first test that every meteorite hunter on the planet uses to separate terrestrial stones from meteorites.

You should use that method too! 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Morlock said:

A meteorite.

That doesn't look like a meteorite to me, and the website the pict is from isn't exactly the metbul.  There's no information on that page provided for that photo other than their claim that it's "a meteorite"; I don't think it is.

 

Their "picture" of a "meteor shower" is computer generated.

 

They have another pict further down that page stating "a meteorite" that I also doubt (little round black one).

 

And below that they show an iron meteorite with the caption "Regmaglypts Visible on an Iron Meteorite", except that it's a piece of shrapnel and there are no regmaglypts present.

 

Just because it's a webpage doesn't mean it's good or accurate information.

Edited by Mikestang
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