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I'm breaking in a new air rifle I thought some of you guys might get a kick out of seeing it.

20200324_114849.jpg

RWS Diana Mod 34. I got it about 6 weeks ago just before my surgery. I figured it would keep me busy while I healed up.

Now it passes some time while we are under stay at home orders.

I'm shooting JSB Match .22 cal pellets that weigh 15.89 grs. 

20200324_114929.jpg

Here is two 12 shot groups at 30 yards. The target on the left is the gun warming up in the sun. The target on the right is with the gun acclimated to the temp. 

I think the spring responds a little quicker as things warm. Maybe the oil gets thinner on the piston.

Whatever the reason it seems to hit a little low when I bring the gun out in the warm sun from the house. Once it gets warmed up it settles down really nicely.

Do any of you guys shoot an airgun?

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Bob,

We have an earlier model Diana that i got from my grandpa. It is a tack driver!! Im not sure of the speed on it but it is fast! 

You will love it once you break it in.

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I've got one of those in .17 caliber, with the RWS scope. Really nice rifles, and very accurate. Mine was given to me by one of my slab-jacking customers. It's like new.

Jim

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-The RWS 34 is a great gun but because of bad shoulders I can only shoot mine 15-20 times before I get sore.  I bought the Benjamin PCP in 22 and 25 cal.  I fill with a scuba tank and they are dead on.  A lot of fun to shoot in my back yard and no one knows as there is no noise.  I live in the country so it doesn't matter.  I like it because it is cheap to shoot.  It takes forever to empty one scuba tank full of air......

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10 hours ago, clay said:

What scope are you using Bob?

It is a cheapo Barska air rifle scope. Not much to crow about. 

It has a nice range adjusted picatinny rail mount that cants the scope downward and gives you plenty of elevation adjustment. 

One of these days I'll get a better scope. But for now this one will do.

I have over 1000 rounds through the gun and it is really settling in. I'm trying different pellets on paper to see what it likes. So far it shoots pretty good with everything. 

I have 40 quail and a dozen cottontails in the yard every day. And so many mourning dove and white wings you can't count them. Lots of eurasian dove as well. I will shoot a eurasian once in a while.

Just down the road there are several big billboards on the interstate. There are about a million pigeons roosting up in the catwalks between those signs. My plan is to do some suburban pigeon hunting. 

Im going to take my turkey blind and sit under one of those signs next week. See how many of those rascals I can knock off the signs.

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3 hours ago, nugget108 said:

Bob,

We have an earlier model Diana that i got from my grandpa. It is a tack driver!! Im not sure of the speed on it but it is fast! 

You will love it once you break it in.

I can't get a backstop that it won't chew through. It is amazing how hard it hits. 

I put a piece of 3/4" waferboard flooring at a steep angle and it held up for a while on 30 yard shots. I set another piece at a lesser angle and it just went through.

I'm making a little trap out of 2×6 and covering it in dirt. Maybe that will last a while before they go zipping across the south 40

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I don't know much about my rifle. I just looked again, and mine is a Model 52, not a 34. I have no idea what the difference is. I haven't shot mine at targets, and have no idea about the accuracy, but it sure does kill the starlings at 30 yds.

Jim

Edited by Idaho Jim
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Very nice shootin. I have the Beeman QB Chief in .22cal. ..  It is a PCP air rifle.  Pump it up to 2000 psi and it is deadly accurate and super quiet with the silencer I put on it.  I get similar groups 30/40 yds.  Droped a dove out to 70yds

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1 hour ago, Idaho Jim said:

I don't know much about my rifle. I just looked again, and mine is a Model 52, not a 34. I have no idea what the difference is. I haven't shot mine at targets, and have no idea about the accuracy, but it sure does kill the starlings at 30 yds.

Jim

I think the 52 is a bit more powerful than mine. And side cocking.

I almost bought that one. Mine has a breaking barrel. It was a bit less expensive than the side cocking rifle.

I sure like the RWS Diana rifles. All of them. I have shot a few over the years and always wanted one. 

I shot a Chinese air gun that was basically a knockoff of the 54. It was a lot of fun and I had it for 25 years. It was .177 cal. It was not nearly the quality of the RWS rifle and it was not very accurate. 

I like the side cocking rifle because the scope and the barrel stay aligned. They say they are a bit more accurate. But I'm sure not complaining.

If I use the rifle rest and don't try to control the recoil at all it really shoots nice. If I try to hold the forend down or pull it into my shoulder the group's get bigger. It will recoil straight back and forth if you just leave it alone and let it jump. 

Holding the rifle in my hands I just lay the forend over my palm and try not to grip too tight with my right hand. It shoots better than I can. I just can't hold it up for too long because it is heavy.

It does have a funny kick. It hits you more than you think it does. I fired 150 rounds one morning and my shoulder was sore. 

I have taken a few grackels with it and a couple eurasian dove. I am looking forward to getting some shots at those fat pigeons. 

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Looks like you aren't going to have a problem hitting those pigeons!....or mice, Bob...LOL  Many years ago, my buddy and I bought S%W .22 caliber pump rifles. We used them at a dump at Uniontown, WA., for killing rats. We hunted at night, with flashlights held under the forearm. Man, that was fun! Their beady little red eyes reflected the light back and gave a good aiming point. Those rats were about 6-8" long, and mean. When one got wounded, the others would attack it. Nasty! Now everything is landfills, and no more rats. We both still have the S&W pump air rifles.

Jim

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Roasted Squab . . . yummm.

ROAST SQUAB.PNG

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8 hours ago, Idaho Jim said:

Looks like you aren't going to have a problem hitting those pigeons!....or mice, Bob...LOL  Many years ago, my buddy and I bought S%W .22 caliber pump rifles. We used them at a dump at Uniontown, WA., for killing rats. We hunted at night, with flashlights held under the forearm. Man, that was fun! Their beady little red eyes reflected the light back and gave a good aiming point. Those rats were about 6-8" long, and mean. When one got wounded, the others would attack it. Nasty! Now everything is landfills, and no more rats. We both still have the S&W pump air rifles.

Jim

When I was young I lives in Kansas for a short time. We shot the heck out of those big corn rats in the grain silos. Man what fun. Sick, awful fun. 

There was an old bunkhouses with a row of beds and a bunch of old junk in it. The rats were so thick in there they stank.

We had a couple flashlights and those old pump up Crosman BB guns. It was hard to kill one with those things. But we put big red welts all over the rat population around that farm.

One of the farmer's older sons bought a Diana rifle. I think it was probably .177 cal. Man he could put the hurt on those rats.i have been a believer in air rifles since.

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I started with a Benjamin pump in .22 when I was a kid back in the mid 60's.  I had a peep sight and a scope on it at one time.  Still have it and it still works!!  Air riffles have come a really long way since then.  Upwards of 1k for some...  too rich for pinking in MHO.

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11 minutes ago, NvAuMiner said:

I started with a Benjamin pump in .22 when I was a kid back in the mid 60's.  I had a peep sight and a scope on it at one time.  Still have it and it still works!!  Air riffles have come a really long way since then.  Upwards of 1k for some...  too rich for pinking in MHO.

There are some competition match air rifles that sell for $4500+, I guess these are not what you would want to buy to shoot rats though!

https://topairgun.com/competiton-air-rifles/

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5 minutes ago, Au Seeker said:

There are some competition match air rifles that sell for $4500+, I guess these are not what you would want to buy to shoot rats though!

https://topairgun.com/competiton-air-rifles/

I have way too many hobbies or irons in the fire to spend that much on a pinker....... and it would diffidently get me cold dinners for ... like forever I'm thinking...:)

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Oh come on Doug, just get one. Haha

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Have a couple; started with a Gamo Shadow Sport 1200, 17cal, Barska 3x12. It shot well. Did a daTuna trigger job and then did a spring job. Accurate and easy shooting. Thought to get into local small time competition and bought a AirArms TX200 in .22, scoped 4x12 and birch. It is sweet stock Had issues with red tops destroying facia on my house. Cost $700 to replace. The redtops had a favorite power pole about 30' out, before they would attack house. Not for long. Best time had: I guess wounded one and it fell straight down. Squaked for longest time and brought in 17 more that were curious. They have pretty much stayed away since. Pellet guns are a lot of fun and cheap to shoot but like anything else can get pricey.

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I bought my son a Hatsan 95 a few weeks ago. Right before the virus hit. It looks like a great rifle and it was very inexpensive. 

It came with a scope that was pretty iffy. But the rifle has an excellent fit and finish and the stock is nice.

I don't think he has had a chance to shoot it yet. We were planning to get it tuned in but he is hunkering down at his place with his wife. Things are getting crazy here and we decided it is best to just stay away from each other until things get better.

I am anxious to see if it is as good as the reviews say it is. It is basically the Diana 34 with just a few differences. The stock is super nice and the mechanism looks tight and we'll made. 

Everyone is raving about the Hatsan rifles and they say it is the best value out there. It was only $145 with the scope. I figure I could not go wrong for that price. If it shoots half as good as the Diana 34 it will be worth it for sure.

Hopefully it will have serious accuracy problems and I can outshoot him. The older I get the cheaper the rifles I buy him. That is the only way I can keep up now days. 

Despite not having shot the rifle I am pretty confident about it. There are hundreds of rave reviews and it looks like the real deal. It has a fully adjustable trigger too. 

Do any of you guys have any experience with the Hatsan rifles?

 

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BOB, used to visit several forums that all gave good info on airguns, but best, I think was GTA- Gateway to Airguns. Might check out-

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a Gamo and Berman with .177 and .22 barrels. The varmints round here don't have a prayer.

There's enough collared dove and rabbits here to feed us through the apocalypse.

Even the .177 will punch through one side of a cinder block at 20 yards.

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On the subject of Rabbits:

A couple of weeks ago, an acquaintance friend of mine who lives near Deming, NM recently caught Tularemia (Rabbit Fever) after being exposed to dead jack rabbits. He's recovering but had a rough time of it and still is not 100%. Caution and social distancing around dead animals in the wild is highly recommended. 

MAYO CLINIC: "Tularemia doesn't occur naturally in humans and isn't known to pass from person to person. However, tularemia occurs worldwide, especially in rural areas, because many mammals, birds and insects are infected with F. tularensis. The organism can live for weeks in soil, water and dead animals.

Unlike some infectious diseases that spread from animals to people through a single route, tularemia has several modes of transmission. How you get the disease usually determines the type and severity of symptoms. In general, you can get tularemia through:

  • Insect bites. Although a number of insects carry tularemia, ticks and deer flies are most likely to transmit the disease to humans. Tick bites cause a large percentage of cases of ulceroglandular tularemia.
  • Exposure to sick or dead animals. Ulceroglandular tularemia can also result from handling or being bitten by an infected animal, most often a rabbit or hare. Bacteria enter the skin through small cuts and abrasions or a bite, and an ulcer forms at the wound site. The ocular form of tularemia can occur when you rub your eyes after touching an infected animal.
  • Airborne bacteria. Bacteria in the soil can become airborne during gardening, construction or other activities that disturb the earth. Inhaling the bacteria can lead to pneumonic tularemia. Laboratory workers who work with tularemia also are at risk of airborne infection.
  • Contaminated food or water. Although uncommon, it's possible to get tularemia from eating undercooked meat of an infected animal or drinking contaminated water. The signs include vomiting, diarrhea and other digestive problems (oropharyngeal tularemia).

    Heat kills F. tularensis, so cook meat to the right temperature — a minimum of 165 F (73.8 C) for ground meat and game meat — to make it safe to eat"

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On 3/24/2020 at 11:01 AM, Bedrock Bob said:

I'm breaking in a new air rifle I thought some of you guys might get a kick out of seeing it.

20200324_114849.jpg

RWS Diana Mod 34. I got it about 6 weeks ago just before my surgery. I figured it would keep me busy while I healed up.

Now it passes some time while we are under stay at home orders.

I'm shooting JSB Match .22 cal pellets that weigh 15.89 grs. 

20200324_114929.jpg

Here is two 12 shot groups at 30 yards. The target on the left is the gun warming up in the sun. The target on the right is with the gun acclimated to the temp. 

I think the spring responds a little quicker as things warm. Maybe the oil gets thinner on the piston.

Whatever the reason it seems to hit a little low when I bring the gun out in the warm sun from the house. Once it gets warmed up it settles down really nicely.

Do any of you guys shoot an airgun?

I had an RWS years ago it was very accurate, It broke and I wasn't able to get it repaired. But still have it as well as a Game and a Browning. I'd like one of the 50 cal's made in Texas.

 

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