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Best corona info I've seen. Bill take it down if it doesn't fit.


FlakMagnet

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Chrisski, our family already had some vegetable gardens but we have built a new raised bed and assembled a chicken coop from a kit (that had directions that were mindnumbingly unintelligible). We are lucky to have soil that grows veggies etc. well and a woman of the house with a decidedly green thumb. The difference in taste from store-bought is stark.

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Chickens in my town need to be located 100' away from a structure, and out yards in my subdivision are not that wide.  I would like to move where I could do that.

For now, Home Depot is providing my soil.  I can compost a little, but not that much.

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23 minutes ago, chrisski said:

Chickens in my town need to be located 100' away from a structure, and out yards in my subdivision are not that wide.  I would like to move where I could do that.

For now, Home Depot is providing my soil.  I can compost a little, but not that much.

chrisski,  If you ever consider growing tomatoes instead of buying those commercial "upside down growers "make you own using 5 gal buckets .  On top of the MT  at Grimes Pass ,ID  I just strung a cable between 2 trees handy to my water pump I had in the creek. White buckets grew them faster than orange ones. I used a plastic sleeve to wrap the roots of already started  plants to insert them in to the hole in the bottom of the bucket. you will figure it out.

 Max

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Squash and okra are what I focused on. Easy to grow and as long as you pick it daily you can get a lot of good food from a small garden.

I have cantaloupe and pumpkin too. 

I have been making lots of stuff from the devil's claw plants. They are similar to okra and produce pounds of food. I saved a bunch of seeds and sowed them in several good spots.  They are already sprouting.

I have reached out to several farms that grow people food. There arent too many of them left these days. And they have limited access to customers. I plan on buying vegetables from them as they ripen and sell them out of my vending trailer this summer.

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It is a well known fact that sunlight kills viruses on surfaces. It does not kill viruses in droplets however. And that accounts for most transmission. 

Most surface transmission occurs inside on high touch surfaces. They generally don't get much sunlight 

So while sunlight kills virus on surfaces it does not make a whole lot of difference in transmission rates.

Viruses persist longer in cool weather. So in the summer interior surfaces are warmer. This may account for a minor decrease in transmission.

Sunlight will not kill viruses in the body or in droplets escaping from your mouth. This is the main route of transmission. Outside in sunlight is safer than inside but it has more to do with air circulation and clouds of vapor lingering in an indoor environment than sunlight.

Sunlight is great to kill virus on masks, clothing and other surfaces. Line drying towels and linens and such. If used in the right way it could be used as a tool to kill virus. But it can't be used as a treatment for disease nor will it affect transmission rates very much.

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ANTI-ACID DRUG FAMOTIDINE BEING TESTED FOR COVID 19: 

A big run on pharmacy sales of common anti-acid drug. Apparently is being tested successfully as a anti-viral medicine for covid 19. Reduced to liquid form, 9 times regular dose, mainlined to patients, seems to be "showing promise" in test trial. Dr. Kevin Tracey, president of Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research at Northwell Health, which runs 23 hospitals in the New York City area, said that's because, theoretically, the structure of famotidine is such that it could stop the virus from replicating, in the same way that protease inhibitors, which are used to treat HIV, stop that virus by interfering with an enzyme that allows the virus to replicate.

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I bet there are a million speedballers headed to Walgreens this morning to score all the Pepsid.

The Cartel will be cornering the raw materials for the drug by noon.

It is looking like humans might not mount a robust immune reaction to the virus. So the prospects of an effective vaccine are sketchy at this point. An effective treatment would be the second best thing.

It turns out that LOTS of people have the virus. It has been going around for a lot longer than we realize. At least in some spots. The vast majority seem to have no symptoms at all. 

That might lead to some clues about treatment too. Most people don't suffer much or at all. Others get very sick. They don't know exactly why. 

That will also lower the statistical "death rate" to WAY below that of the common flu. For those hyper focused on comparing kill rates with the flu it will bring much vindication. That won't affect the staggering death toll. It won't slow the pandemic or make it any less of a crisis but it will bring some who focus on numbers some satisfaction.

Statistics tell us the virus will infect about 50% of us by fall. We have no idea how many are already infected. Where testing has been done in sample groups this rate of spread seems very possible. 

Some theorize that the virus can go dormant in asymptomatic people. Then blossom into sickness. I have heard educated opinions that say we don't really know if people are asymptomatic or actually presymtomatic for an extended period. 

Either way this stuff is a buttload more contagious than we thought at first. And has the sneaky habit of not showing symptoms. Finding an effective treatment is going to be more important than developing a vaccine right now. The best case scenario gives us a vaccine that MIGHT give us immunity by next summer. At the projected rate of growth of this virus in the U.S. that will be too darn late for most of us. We will already be infected.

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You can have life without liberty.

You can't have liberty without life.

I prefer to concentrate on keeping my loved ones alive for now.  We'll worry about the rest later.

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1 hour ago, LukeJ said:

You can have life without liberty.

You can't have liberty without life.

I prefer to concentrate on keeping my loved ones alive for now.  We'll worry about the rest later.

Bingo!

Priorities are important. We can all go back and make millions rebuilding this economy into something more sensible and sustainable once we figure this thing out.

It pays to keep your powder dry and wait for the storm to pass. Then don't shoot until you can see the whites of their eyes. That is sage advice in any battle. This one is no different.

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On ‎4‎/‎25‎/‎2020 at 6:03 PM, Bedrock Bob said:

Squash and okra are what I focused on. Easy to grow and as long as you pick it daily you can get a lot of good food from a small garden.

I have cantaloupe and pumpkin too. 

I have been making lots of stuff from the devil's claw plants. They are similar to okra and produce pounds of food. I saved a bunch of seeds and sowed them in several good spots.  They are already sprouting.

I have reached out to several farms that grow people food. There arent too many of them left these days. And they have limited access to customers. I plan on buying vegetables from them as they ripen and sell them out of my vending trailer this summer.

I actually have all those planted except the Devil's claw.  I ordered some of the white seeds, which are supposed to grow over a foot long and I will try those.

On ‎4‎/‎25‎/‎2020 at 4:40 PM, Gilaoro said:

chrisski,  If you ever consider growing tomatoes instead of buying those commercial "upside down growers "make you own using 5 gal buckets .  On top of the MT  at Grimes Pass ,ID  I just strung a cable between 2 trees handy to my water pump I had in the creek. White buckets grew them faster than orange ones. I used a plastic sleeve to wrap the roots of already started  plants to insert them in to the hole in the bottom of the bucket. you will figure it out.

Max--I like the idea of the upside down tomatoes, but don't really have a place to hang them in my small yard.  The five gallon bucket probably weigs at least 60 LBS and as cheap as these houses are built, would probably take down my cieling on my porch.  The birds here attacked and ate my tomatoes I planted last year.  They would get them as soon as they'd bud,  I'd also need bird netting for those.  Perhaps in the next place I live.

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10 minutes ago, chrisski said:

I actually have all those planted except the Devil's claw.  I ordered some of the white seeds, which are supposed to grow over a foot long and I will try those.

Right on Chris!

There are several species of them. One species is a perennial and comes back from the roots each year. Those are different and have big yellow flowers.

The rest are annuals and a lot easier to grow. The white seeded ones are the ones the Hopi hybridized long ago. They use them for food and basket weaving. They have little purple orchid looking flowers and will give you hundreds of pods on each plant if you pick them small. 

You can make pickles, fry them, bake them or stew them. You can eat them raw too. You would think they would be bitter and awful but they are not. They taste sort of like cucumbers but are like okra too. 

The devil claws (cuernitos or garabullos) were a big source of food for the natives. Amaranth was the number one food and it is EVERYWHERE in our desert this year. These kinds of plants are super easy to grow and produce a whole bunch of food. They are easy to wildcraft too. Most of the time you can locate stands of wild plants and never have to plant a seed. 

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There have been over 1 million diagnosed COVID-19 cases in the US now and more than 56,000 have died. Nobody knows how many would have been infected without the steps we have taken to stop the spread of this nasty virus but there is no doubt the numbers of those infected and those who died would have been substantially higher.
We can come back as a nation but the people who are gone are gone forever. Please try to keep that in mind and be patient as we go forward. The life you save may be your own or that of a loved one and as you can see on this map, the virus is in every corner of our country. Remember that masks help protect others. You may be asymptomatic and able to infect others without even knowing it.
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9 minutes ago, Dakota Slim said:
There have been over 1 million diagnosed COVID-19 cases in the US now and more than 56,000 have died. Nobody knows how many would have been infected without the steps we have taken to stop the spread of this nasty virus but there is no doubt the numbers of those infected and those who died would have been substantially higher.
We can come back as a nation but the people who are gone are gone forever. Please try to keep that in mind and be patient as we go forward. The life you save may be your own or that of a loved one and as you can see on this map, the virus is in every corner of our country. Remember that masks help protect others. You may be asymptomatic and able to infect others without even knowing it.

An excellent post Slim! 

Good advice and information. I truly appreciate your contribution!

Edited by Bedrock Bob
We agree more than we disagree. So let's do that! I am not your enemy unless you want me to be.
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37 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

An excellent post Slim! 

Good advice and information. I truly appreciate your contribution!

Thanks Bob. I had a doctor appointment last Friday and there were 3 others in the waiting room when I got there. All of us were wearing masks and separated by at least 6 feet. One gal was there with her elderly mother and they were both from Kingman where known cases are increasing at a moderate pace. Sure enough, the gal from Kingman took off her mask and started talking non stop. :yikes:
She didn't cough or sneeze but she put out enough warm moist air in her meaningless drivel to infect hundreds of people. 
I got up and waited outside. I guess the gal from Kingman never heard that masks protect others.   

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Here is another site showing daily statistics. As you can see by the graphs below the state statistics, the number of newly diagnosed cases in the US has stabilized but it still indicates that approximately 30,000 new cases are being  identified every day, and while the number of daily deaths appears to be going down, this disease is still killing well over 1,000 people a day. 

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/?fbclid=IwAR0paNUNVad6SjT-1114_Z9R7ydA9Lr26-JR1gd9vOzocoJGuI4ihS-l-qo

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On 4/25/2020 at 3:56 PM, FlakMagnet said:

Chrisski, our family already had some vegetable gardens but we have built a new raised bed and assembled a chicken coop from a kit (that had directions that were mindnumbingly unintelligible). We are lucky to have soil that grows veggies etc. well and a woman of the house with a decidedly green thumb. The difference in taste from store-bought is stark.

Nothing better than home grown veggies and beef Flak.

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5 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Right on Chris!

There are several species of them. One species is a perennial and comes back from the roots each year. Those are different and have big yellow flowers.

The rest are annuals and a lot easier to grow. The white seeded ones are the ones the Hopi hybridized long ago. They use them for food and basket weaving. They have little purple orchid looking flowers and will give you hundreds of pods on each plant if you pick them small. 

You can make pickles, fry them, bake them or stew them. You can eat them raw too. You would think they would be bitter and awful but they are not. They taste sort of like cucumbers but are like okra too. 

The devil claws (cuernitos or garabullos) were a big source of food for the natives. Amaranth was the number one food and it is EVERYWHERE in our desert this year. These kinds of plants are super easy to grow and produce a whole bunch of food. They are easy to wildcraft too. Most of the time you can locate stands of wild plants and never have to plant a seed. 

 I love the devils claw pickles and the battered and fried like okra ones! And I used to get the completely dry ones, spray paint them different colors and sell them in the flea market , tourists from back east go crazy over them , then everyone started doing it too!.  There's a spot just south of the I-8 right before the Arizona / New Mexico state line where they were so thick it looked like they had been planted. I have also heard them called cow catchers ?

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5 hours ago, chrisski said:

I actually have all those planted except the Devil's claw.  I ordered some of the white seeds, which are supposed to grow over a foot long and I will try those.

Max--I like the idea of the upside down tomatoes, but don't really have a place to hang them in my small yard.  The five gallon bucket probably weigs at least 60 LBS and as cheap as these houses are built, would probably take down my cieling on my porch.  The birds here attacked and ate my tomatoes I planted last year.  They would get them as soon as they'd bud,  I'd also need bird netting for those.  Perhaps in the next place I live.

 chrisski , You only put enough dirt in the bucket to cover the roots, let them grow flat in side the bucket and if you have a compost pile you can make it very light , put some  streamers  on the buckets and the birds will leave them alone. I used the ones that comes with Mylar balloons and even old cut balloons too. Don't over water!

Max

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1 hour ago, Gilaoro said:

 I love the devils claw pickles and the battered and fried like okra ones! And I used to get the completely dry ones, spray paint them different colors and sell them in the flea market , tourists from back east go crazy over them , then everyone started doing it too!.  There's a spot just south of the I-8 right before the Arizona / New Mexico state line where they were so thick it looked like they had been planted. I have also heard them called cow catchers ?

Hey Max!

Here is my latest swarm.

20200427_183607.jpg

It takes 6 claws to make a scorpion. 2 goatheads for eyes. And barrel cactus thorns for mandibles. 

20200427_183622.jpg

They are "grabby" with those legs and will stick to your curtains, hat, sun visor, etc.

I have sold over 400 scorpions so far. That makes 2400 stickers collected to make them!

I make turkeys, peacocks and roosters out of them too. I first saw them in Mexico years ago and liked the idea so much I started making them to sell.

In Texas they call them "cow catchers". They are called devil claw, double claw and unicorn plant too. Here they call them cuernitos or garambullios. I bet they have a bunch of names depending on your locality, culture etc.

They are super cool plants and are very useful. 

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