Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

Sutter's Mill meteorite was the size of a mini van, this one the size of a microwave oven so approximately 10% of the size of SMM.

The widest point of the strewn field of the SMM is about 12k ft., so I would submit that the strewn field of the Prescott fall could be as small as 1200 ft. 

I know nothing of the speed / angles or make up of the Prescott fall so as Dennis Miller would say, "that is my opinion and I may be wrong".

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 83
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I don't see any dark colored rocks in the photos of the area. Fresh meteorites have a very distinctive dark colored fusion crust which any meteorite hunter should be able to readily indentify, even fr

This site estimate that the strewn field is well north of skull valley , and they indicated that dopplar showed some imagery indicating meteorites. https://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/meteorite-falls/event

I was out there today for a few hours .....This is what the terrain looks like and there are lots of open areas to check. I think a freshly fallen meteorite would actually stand out fairly well in the

Posted Images

46 minutes ago, GeoJack said:

Sutter's Mill meteorite was the size of a mini van, this one the size of a microwave oven so approximately 10% of the size of SMM.

 

I think the volume of a mini van is 100 to 150 times that of a microwave oven. At least the ones I use.  Or maybe I misunderstood what you stated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do any of these strewn field estimates take into account drift from the direction of travel and an object traveling at 11 km / s slowing to a terminal velocity of about 80 m/s?

That could put the fragments dozens of miles away from where the fireball was sited.  One of the shuttle disasters shot debris a couple of hundred miles.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my opinion on strewn field size. Keep in mind I don't have any actual experience and get all my knowledge from Google.  But this is my theory...

I think the size of the strewn field depends a lot on the altitude and energy released in the bolide. Also the durability of the material. 

A big iron that sticks together might make a small strewn field. A little chondrite might get blown to bits and spread out over a wide area.

An object that explodes violently will scatter stuff farther. An object that explodes high up will scatter wider. 

So how big the strewn field may be on any given fall is probably highly variable. 

Holbrook is pretty big in area. Lots of little ones. There are five miles between my farthest finds in Glorieta. There is iron strung in a line for 60 miles in western New Mexico.

A microwave sized chunk that hangs together could have a strewn field of one square foot. Or it may scatter into pieces high up and the strewn field be miles wide.

The shape of an object really affects its flight too. A flattened shotgun pellet will fly in a curve. It stands to reason that the less aerodynamic pieces will expand the pattern. With miles to fall and minutes in dark flight an odd shaped meteor could impact a long way from its plumper compadres. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/1/2020 at 4:43 PM, chrisski said:

Do any of these strewn field estimates take into account drift from the direction of travel and an object traveling at 11 km / s slowing to a terminal velocity of about 80 m/s?

That could put the fragments dozens of miles away from where the fireball was sited.  One of the shuttle disasters shot debris a couple of hundred miles.

I'm sure these professional meteorite hunters take into consideration all factors when it comes to locating a strewn field. Maybe they'll be some pieces found, maybe they'll won't be as it could have completely disintegrated. Time will tell.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

It's been about a month now since this fall occured. Anyone know if they're still out in the field looking for pieces of this? Or have they given up? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there was ever a consensus reached on exactly where to hunt.  I think most people have given up, especially with all the spring growth obscuring the ground.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Mikestang said:

I don't think there was ever a consensus reached on exactly where to hunt.  I think most people have given up, especially with all the spring growth obscuring the ground.

Perhaps one of these days someone will stumble into some pieces but never be associated with this fall.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...