Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

You might want to stop in and talk to the ranchers there before you start searching their land. Sometimes rural folk don't take kindly to strangers wandering their property without permission.

If you find meteorites on private land remember that the meteorite belongs to the landowner not the finder.

The area is known as Fair Oaks. Not a bad name for a meteorite.

Good luck!

Edited by clay
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 83
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I don't see any dark colored rocks in the photos of the area. Fresh meteorites have a very distinctive dark colored fusion crust which any meteorite hunter should be able to readily indentify, even fr

This site estimate that the strewn field is well north of skull valley , and they indicated that dopplar showed some imagery indicating meteorites. https://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/meteorite-falls/event

I was out there today for a few hours .....This is what the terrain looks like and there are lots of open areas to check. I think a freshly fallen meteorite would actually stand out fairly well in the

Posted Images

1 hour ago, clay said:

You might want to stop in and talk to the ranchers there before you start searching their land. Sometimes rural folk don't take kindly to strangers wandering their property without permission.

If you find meteorites on private land remember that the meteorite belongs to the landowner not the finder.

The area is known as Fair Oaks. Not a bad name for a meteorite.

Good luck!

That's for sure, it also happens my friends family has a ranch in the area, not too long ago an air force jet crashed on their property and finding anything was most difficult. Not only is private property an issue, the terrain is the most difficult kind you can imagine. Between the juniper, the basalt and mud the only way to really hunt this will be on foot and of course and that might take a little while before we see some meteorites. Gook luck indeed hunters!

Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite strategy is to snap a few neo magnets on the ranfla and just drive over the strewn field. The tiny fragments will stick to the magnets along with all the other junk.

When hunting private land it is best to get permission. And don't forget to take extra water, wear clean underwear and dress appropriately. A wide brimmed hat and sensible shoes are a must. And make sure to carry lip blam and toilet paper too! 

:rolleyes:

 

...You guys are a hoot. 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Thanks Dad
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bad weather report nearby Chino Valley.

100% chance of rain all day long Saturday with the high about 53* dropping to 30* in the wee hours of Sunday morning with very light flurries. Light rain tapering off later Sunday morning and mostly cloudy all day with the high climbing to 57*. 

Maybe next weekend.

billpeters

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was out there today for a few hours .....This is what the terrain looks like and there are lots of open areas to check. I think a freshly fallen meteorite would actually stand out fairly well in the area. A quad or side by side would be a good idea, as the forest service roads are narrow with lots of bushes. Dont Get Lost ! 

Obviously,  if I found something I wouldnt tell you  :200::D 

 

IMG_2915.JPG

IMG_2916.JPG

Edited by adam
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha you said it Adam, don't get lost out there. My friend and i used to hunt alligator juniper for custom furniture and railing that he would sell to the rich and famous of Vail and Aspen. We almost got lost a couple times and would routinely loose some of the piles of wood that we spent lots of time cutting.  Take care and be safe out there.:hiker:  

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, hardtimehermit said:

That's for sure, it also happens my friends family has a ranch in the area, not too long ago an air force jet crashed on their property and finding anything was most difficult. Not only is private property an issue, the terrain is the most difficult kind you can imagine. Between the juniper, the basalt and mud the only way to really hunt this will be on foot and of course and that might take a little while before we see some meteorites. Gook luck indeed hunters!

Perfect terrain for horseback. Should be able to cover the ground faster as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Perfect terrain for horseback. Should be able to cover the ground faster as well.

Was thinking the same thing...kind of like the shed hunting I do on horseback each spring.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Edge said:

Was thinking the same thing...kind of like the shed hunting I do on horseback each spring.

A shed is easy to spot from a horse. A meteorite not so much.

Imagine dismounting a thousand times a day to get a magnet close to a suspect rock. Then climbing back on the horse just to dismount for the next dark colored rock. 

It seems to me riding a horse would be a lot like putting magnets on your truck and driving.

Just sayin'....

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Morlock said:

Perfect terrain for horseback. Should be able to cover the ground faster as well.

A horse covers ground faster than a human by a fair margin. I am not sure how that gets more ground covered when hunting for meteorites. It is not about how fast you can travel. It is about how well you can see the ground and identify suspect rocks.

:idunno:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see any dark colored rocks in the photos of the area. Fresh meteorites have a very distinctive dark colored fusion crust which any meteorite hunter should be able to readily indentify, even from atop a horse. The extra height also means you'll be able to see over quite of few of the "bushes" so you should be able to cover more ground in less time. If I had access to a horse in that area, that's the way I would go.

 

Edited by Morlock
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Morlock said:

I don't see any dark colored rocks in the photos of the area. Fresh meteorites have a very distinctive dark colored fusion crust which any meteorite hunter should be able to readily indentify, even from atop a horse. The extra height also means you'll be able to see over quite of few of the "bushes" so you should be able to cover more ground in less time. If I had access to a horse in that area, that's the way I would go.

 

Was like when I'd go hunting on the private ranches around mine in UT. I could spot any igneous rock from the saddle, cuz they were all out of place in that sandstone environment.

Edited by Edge
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

A shed is easy to spot from a horse. A meteorite not so much.

Imagine dismounting a thousand times a day to get a magnet close to a suspect rock. Then climbing back on the horse just to dismount for the next dark colored rock. 

It seems to me riding a horse would be a lot like putting magnets on your truck and driving.

Just sayin'....

While their are difficulties in the proposed hypothetical, they are not above resolution.

A "cabriolet"(2-wheel cariage) could trail the horse to make dismounts much easier.

As far as dangling magnets are concerned,  if they could be kept separated by mounting on ridgid axles and extension poles, the problem of them being attracted to each other could be mitigated. Guide plates extending part way towards the ground could further keep the magnets swinging smoothly.

This would also allow proper repulsive orientations to be fixed,naturally ,negating attractive forces to adjacent magnets.

Magnets on strings just would not work easily.

Optimally, an electro-magnet(s)  setup would be implemented, as it would just entail switching off the current to drop the load over an inspection screen placed by the meteorite hunter. Permanent magnets would need too much  manual cleaning.

  I 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

While their are difficulties in the proposed hypothetical, they are not above resolution.

A "cabriolet"(2-wheel cariage) could trail the horse to make dismounts much easier.

As far as dangling magnets are concerned,  if they could be kept separated by mounting on ridgid axles and extension poles, the problem of them being attracted to each other could be mitigated. Guide plates extending part way towards the ground could further keep the magnets swinging smoothly.

This would also allow proper repulsive orientations to be fixed,naturally ,negating attractive forces to adjacent magnets.

Magnets on strings just would not work easily.

Optimally, an electro-magnet(s)  setup would be implemented, as it would just entail switching off the current to drop the load over an inspection screen placed by the meteorite hunter. Permanent magnets would need too much  manual cleaning.

  I 

Hows bout I put my rare earth magnates on a telescoping pole.

I appreciate all the concern, though. Lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

If it works out on a playa, I see no reason it shouldn't work in rougher country, if only limited by the terrain and the frequency of cleaning black sand and nails and assorted ferrous trash from the magnets.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Morlock said:

I don't see any dark colored rocks in the photos of the area. Fresh meteorites have a very distinctive dark colored fusion crust which any meteorite hunter should be able to readily indentify, even from atop a horse. The extra height also means you'll be able to see over quite of few of the "bushes" so you should be able to cover more ground in less time. If I had access to a horse in that area, that's the way I would go.

 

If'n you say so.... :inocent:

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Edge said:

Was like when I'd go hunting on the private ranches around mine in UT. I could spot any igneous rock from the saddle, cuz they were all out of place in that sandstone environment.

Yeah, but did you find any meteorites?

If you want to hunt meteorites from atop a horse and you think that is preferable than hunting on foot then I wish you nothing but luck.

:thumbsupanim

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Added emoticon to impart humor and good cheer.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

If it works out on a playa, I see no reason it shouldn't work in rougher country, if only limited by the terrain and the frequency of cleaning black sand and nails and assorted ferrous trash from the magnets.

News flash. It does not work out on the playa either.

:idunno:

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Added emoticon because dragging magnets is just silly.
Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Edge said:

Hows bout I put my rare earth magnates on a telescoping pole.

I appreciate all the concern, though. Lol

That would ease the chore of dismounting and mounting your caballo,, for sure.

 A carriage, on the other hand, would allow the transport and storage of more equipment and  sundry items for a comfortable and safe hunt in the back country , taking the load off Ol' Thunder. That should give you more mgb...miles per bale(of alfalfa). It would be limited by terrain, of course.

Not to mention , a place to mount the hypothetical row of long duty-cycle electromagnets(and power source).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree with Bob, your not trying to cover ground fast, and i am telling you the area is pretty rough and i think a person would end up having to pay more attention to riding than looking for meteorites. If you take the four legs out i wish you luck and be safe.

31 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

News flash. It does not work out on the playa either.

:idunno:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Yeah, but did you find any meteorites?

If you want to hunt meteorites from atop a horse and you think that is preferable than hunting on foot then I wish you nothing but luck.

:thumbsupanim

Wasn't hunting meteorites but certain stones, was good at it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bedrock Bob said:

News flash. It does not work out on the playa either.

:idunno:

I could see that being the case after a few wet cycles softened the surface enough, giving the space rock time (and a chance) to sink into  the surface.

But, if it is still visible to the collector (a fresh fall) ,  I see no reason why it wouldn't stick, if spotted/ prodded with a magnet.

Unless it's carbonaceous or made of Venusian sandstone.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...