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There could be meteorites from different dimensions (article)


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I just found out they found presolar grains so it follows that these grains came from a different nebulae. Stars could have been born around us forever, who knows? They could end up being from antimatter too or dark matter. https://phys.org/news/2020-01-curious-curiouser-meteorite-chunk-unexpected.html

Here is one I found today as my knee was dislocated, It was blended in with leaves, it's black with a brownish unremovable crust. Theis couldbe from a proto-dimension. Thought it could also be a good candidate for photo i.d..

Before you say it's slag...

How is there a translucent brown crust and pitting on the shoulders?

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Edited by WillM
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8 minutes ago, Au Seeker said:

Wow did you find that slag in the twilight zone??:rolleyes:

It was on top of fresh leaves that covered the forest floor, like it just hit recently, it kind of looks like a leaf. I wonder if the pain from the knee dislocation made me see it because I passed it up before. :miner:

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48 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

100% not a meteorite, not even close.

How was it on leaves and has glypts lol?

When they are, meteorites are more common than slag. You have not refuted me with even a tiny bit of science. I would have been impressed if you did. 

You are correct, this is not close to looking like any meteorite known. It was hard to find so it was not slag, trust me I would know. 

Devilish how close slag resembles it in shapes.

I am working on aesthetic chemistry so you can predict what any given meteorite would look like with whatever mineral. It has to do with the molecular shear force.

Either slag or rarest meteorite on the market.

Still slag by odds though so I will give you that.

Edited by WillM
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21 minutes ago, WillM said:

How was it on leaves and has glypts lol?

When they are, meteorites are more common than slag. You have not refuted me with even a tiny bit of science. I would have been impressed if you did. 

You are correct, this is not close to looking like any meteorite known. It was hard to find so it was not slag, trust me I would know. 

Devilish how close slag resembles it in shapes.

I am working on aesthetic chemistry so you can predict what any given meteorite would look like with whatever mineral. It has to do with the molecular shear force.

Either slag or rarest meteorite on the market.

Still slag by odds though so I will give you that.

The "thumbs up" is due to your continued improvements in taking the time to edit typos. The result makes for a less distracting visual presentation, although the hypothetical and abstract nature of the content may still need work. :)

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1 hour ago, WillM said:

How was it on leaves

 

No idea, and immaterial to any discussion here.

 

1 hour ago, WillM said:

and has glypts lol?

 

Absolutely 0 regmaglypts on that piece of slag.

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48 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

No idea, and immaterial to any discussion here.

 

Absolutely 0 regmaglypts on that piece of slag.

Location is a big factor in determining the origin, it was in a place inaccesable to humans as well, under a very low branch, I could barely reach it.

In the video, you can see I put my thumb into the rock like a slot. In multiple places (there are more)

I hope the video is enough data for you to see it does have thumbprints. I tried to show how it flows and that the edges are lipped. It looks oriented with a multi tone crust. It is a green color and slag is a smelting byproduct made up of mostly the same elements, none of them greenish like this. Are they?

If I had to guess what else it could be I would say a rock but we all know rocks are smoother. (Atleast the ones I find).

This also has the texture of leather, another contributing feature, in fact I am willing to bet no matter how deep a test you do on it, it won't be slag mineral.

Maybe a helicoptor was carrying slag on a rope and it fell into the forest, at most.

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WillM,

It is a standard sedimentary quartz filled conglomerate rock. Non-iron meteorites rarely have thumbprints. Your rock has typical weathering varnish. There are no flow lines on your rock. It does not have surface features or any other characteristics of a meteorite. There are billions of loose rocks on top of the ground in forests across the USA, none of which are meteorites.

Cheers!

billpeters

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4 minutes ago, billpeters said:

WillM,

It is a standard sedimentary quartz filled conglomerate rock. Non-iron meteorites rarely have thumbprints. Your rock has typical weathering varnish. There are no flow lines on your rock. It does not have surface features or any other characteristics of a meteorite. There are billions of loose rocks on top of the ground in forests across the USA, none of which are meteorites.

Cheers!

billpeters

Every edge has pitting the carves into the other side. This does not sparkle like silica.

The edges (shoulders) are pitted like it was molten and had wind pushing around it's sides. The surfaces are dimpled to varying degrees. This is all in an aerodynamic, organized manner.

I need to get a grip really, these are very rare objects, identifying them online is far fetched. 

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1 hour ago, Haderly said:

You need to start looking up locations of old iron furnaces and see how they correlate to all your finds. Below is a good list to start with that have locations in several states. My aesthetic analysis indicates that what you are finding is common smelter slag.

http://oldindustry.org/iron.html

There were no furnaces nearby. I will get a mineral test one day because slag is always certain minerals. I found a rock like this alone, there were none like it in the area.

How rare is it to find a meteorite? And then have it look good enough to identify online? Very rare. And then even a new one! (even more rare). If I find out one is slag, I will be able to count out others.

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WillM,

"Every edge has pitting the carves into the other side- WillM" from the appearance of your rock is clear proof that it is not a meteorite. "The surfaces are dimpled to varying degrees- WillM" appearance of your rock is further proof that it is not a meteorite. You rock shows no signs of ever having been melted. The quartz makeup and deep holes are additional overwhelming proof that it is not a meteorite.

Your rock is not slag at all. It is a common sedimentary, quartz filled, conglomerate stone.

Cheers!

billpeters

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18 hours ago, billpeters said:

WillM,

"Every edge has pitting the carves into the other side- WillM" from the appearance of your rock is clear proof that it is not a meteorite. "The surfaces are dimpled to varying degrees- WillM" appearance of your rock is further proof that it is not a meteorite. You rock shows no signs of ever having been melted. The quartz makeup and deep holes are additional overwhelming proof that it is not a meteorite.

Your rock is not slag at all. It is a common sedimentary, quartz filled, conglomerate stone.

Cheers!

billpeters

Hey, I found a similar stone a ways away and it appears to have an irridecent, color-changing crust. Does that sound like quartz? The paper thin shiny film also comes through on camera this is just like a fresh martian or something. (Probably never been seen).

So anyways I saw a website that said meteorites were irridecent and I wondered if that changed the game here.

As you can see, they look similar.

Let me know.

Thanks.

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1 hour ago, WillM said:

Hey, I found a similar stone a ways away and it appears to have an irridecent, color-changing crust. Does that sound like quartz? The paper thin shiny film also comes through on camera this is just like a fresh martian or something. (Probably never been seen).

So anyways I saw a website that said meteorites were irridecent and I wondered if that changed the game here.

As you can see, they look similar.

Let me know.

Thanks.

20200131_103148.jpg

20200131_103342.jpg

20200131_103216.jpg

20200131_103153.jpg

 

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Throw it away WillM,

You have never presented us with anything that resembles a meteorite.

Please buy a real meteorite.

billpeters

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2 hours ago, WillM said:

Hey, I found a similar stone a ways away and it appears to have an irridecent, color-changing crust. Does that sound like quartz? The paper thin shiny film also comes through on camera this is just like a fresh martian or something. (Probably never been seen).

So anyways I saw a website that said meteorites were irridecent and I wondered if that changed the game here.

As you can see, they look similar.

Let me know.

Thanks.

20200131_103148.jpg

20200131_103342.jpg

20200131_103216.jpg

20200131_103153.jpg

I live in St Louis and have visited Randy Korotev of Washington University, one of the prominent experts in lunar meteorites and meteorites in general. He's made a website for people who think they've found meteorites. 

I suggest you visit his website before posting your photos. Make sure you see all the links.

https://sites.wustl.edu/meteoritesite/items/what_to_do/

 

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57 minutes ago, billpeters said:

Throw it away WillM,

You have never presented us with anything that resembles a meteorite.

Please buy a real meteorite.

billpeters

Billpeters, these only look like brazillian meteorites and some from the gem show. So of course nobody has seen anything like it. I think the sharp edges rules it out. But there is no slag explaination about the sharp edges?

I am getting the mineral test soon like I got with the quartz. 

I admit, I do not know much about ablation, it turns out, it is a huge subject. I need to take a calculus class to try to see what the relationships mean. Even a meteorite service said it was not one magnetically or petrographically. They suggest a second opinion though, so EVEN THEY admit it looks like a meteorite.

You simply cannot deny that the lips meet each other. This could be a good skatepark! Just would have to model it, it is ramps you can jump off of and into.

It's like the board game chutes and ladders with edges and pits. 

Every meteorite like rock I have posted in this forum has been stolen from me so don't worry about them. In part because nobody will believe me and offer protection.

Not my fault I go on walks and meteorwrongs are everywhere. I am into exercise and visual art.

These smell weird too.

Real meteorites are expensive :brows:

 

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8 minutes ago, Morlock said:

I live in St Louis and have visited Randy Korotev of Washington University, one of the prominent experts in lunar meteorites and meteorites in general. He's made a website for people who think they've found meteorites. 

I suggest you visit his website before posting your photos. Make sure you see all the links.

https://sites.wustl.edu/meteoritesite/items/what_to_do/

 

I have emailed Randy, he judges meteorites off of the elements alone for a more expensive test. I think he ignored my last email because I thought the data proved the (now stolen) rock was from Venus. The rock I sent him is gone. I have read through his work, it is very interesting and these fit the description. When I get my mineral data+ elements for $50 I am emailing every scientist possible and will probably post it here.

 

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30 minutes ago, WillM said:

I have emailed Randy, he judges meteorites off of the elements alone for a more expensive test. I think he ignored my last email because I thought the data proved the (now stolen) rock was from Venus. The rock I sent him is gone. I have read through his work, it is very interesting and these fit the description. When I get my mineral data+ elements for $50 I am emailing every scientist possible and will probably post it here.

 

I can assure you Mr Korotev didn't steal your meteorite. He threw it into the rock pile where all the other meteorwrongs that he receives in the mail wind up. He simply doesn't have time and money to send back all the rocks people send to him.

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2 hours ago, Morlock said:

I can assure you Mr Korotev didn't steal your meteorite. He threw it into the rock pile where all the other meteorwrongs that he receives in the mail wind up. He simply doesn't have time and money to send back all the rocks people send to him.

I mever sent him a rock, just a picture. Pictures can't ID new meteorites because we don't know enough. I tried reaching out to NASA to talk to a meteorite expert there. Randy only emails you if he thinks it might be a meteorite and he emailed me back. I got stuck in the hospital on special terms and people removed every rock from my house and put it in the backyard, now the best ones are missing. They must be too stupid to know we all know eachother, they will get caught if they try to sell or authenticate it with the bulletin.

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