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Hi

Is it possible for a meteorite to be so soft that it is easily filled with no effort or packed with sand like granules.

No streak test  appears fragile 

Magnetic 

1.9 to 2.1 dinsty , small hard to measure 

 Very porous

 It has groups of granules that do not change color in water.

Looks like fusion crust

Looks like flow lines 

Looks thumbprints x4 visible ones

Found in free fill that was delivered to help grade the property we moved to recently. 

Thank you for taking the time to view my post 

 

 

 

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On 1/25/2020 at 3:50 PM, Wahib said:

Hi

Is it possible for a meteorite to be so soft that it is easily filled with no effort or packed with sand like granules.

No streak test  appears fragile 

Magnetic 

1.9 to 2.1 dinsty , small hard to measure 

 Very porous

 It has groups of granules that do not change color in water.

Looks like fusion crust

Looks like flow lines 

Looks thumbprints x4 visible ones

Found in free fill that was delivered to help grade the property we moved to recently. 

Thank you for taking the time to view my post 

 

 

 

20200125_113915.jpg

20200125_122123.jpg

20200125_122248.jpg

20200125_122925.jpg

20200125_123221.jpg

20200125_121903.jpg

20200125_113316.jpg

Most meteorites are 3.0 density+ because of the heavy metal.This does not appear meteoric to me. That bring said there is another type of meteorite called a planetary meteorite. Does it have holes where gas escaped? It appears to be man made but it could be planetary. 

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That is so small that I would think getting density would be difficult.  Especially as porous as that rock is.  I bet most stuff on earth has a density of 3.0 give or take .5,

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It is not that it has holes i think it absorbs water just like mud and it contains it for hours

I can file it with my finger tip if I do it hard it knocks the stones out , it really looks like  Deteriorated gypsum ,

The out side is alot more solid

I thought it might be man made with a rust layers on it

 

The thumbprints got me 

Thank you for the feed back

 

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It is hematite replacement. Sandstone that has undergone iron enrichment by a chemical process. 

It gets waterlogged easy. A specific gravity can only be done accurately by extracting the water with vacuum and then wighing dry. Then weigh in water.

 

It's terrestrial iron.

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Hi

 Thank you all  for taking the time to view my post.

 I had a chance after work to take a look with a magnifying glass and trying to see if I can get better pictures, I will put it in the rock garden,

 It had stuff that looked like flow lines and thump prints inside of it I wanted to see how much it would take to break , medium pressure and it split in half and it does have  holes  

 I do have a few more to share so I'll put this one away but here are the last few pictures I took

 I really have to watch my spelling lol. 

opposit not option of other pic

Thank you

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, WillM said:

Most meteorites are 3.0 density+ because of the heavy metal.This does not appear meteoric to me. That bring said there is another type of meteorite called a planetary meteorite. Does it have holes where gas escaped? It appears to be man made but it could be planetary. 

  I would like to learn more about the differences between meteorite  gas vapor ventilation lines and terrestrial rocks vapor ventilation lines if there is such thing. 

Cheers.

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Flow lines are on the surface. Where material has been pushed into a "wave". 

If you cut a window into the rock you are not seeing flow lines. That only happens in the thin surface of the crust. The only thing I can think of is you are seeing banding and changes of coloration inside the rock. That indicates chemical weathering. 

Take a lump of wax the size of a tennis ball. Cut fresh surfaces on it while it is cold. Then take a heat gun and hold it close enough to melt the surface of the wax and move that surface with the air. Look at what happened and the pattern it makes. THOSE ARE FLOW LINES.

If you cut a window in the wax you would cut away any flow lines you made with the heat gun. So the answer to your question is no. There cannot be flow lines in the window. Flow lines are the waves and smooth fused ripples formed as a result of friction on the crusted surface.

Dimples like regmaglypts do not usually form in stony meteorites. Generally speaking regmaglypts are an iron meteorite trait. Stones certainly have surface features influenced by friction but they are much less durable than a hunk of steel flying through the air.

Learn your terminology and look at specimens with flow lines. Learn what fusion crust actually looks like by research and hands on learning. Learn what chondrules are. Throw away every rock that does dot have free metallic iron in it. Learn the difference between metallic iron and mineral iron. 

If your rock does not have free metallic iron or chondrules throw it away. Period. 

Don't nickel test anything. A nickel test proves absolutely nothing. All a person can do toward identifying a meteorite is find a rock with metallic iron or chondrules. You may spot something that looks like fusion crust or flow lines and it may cause you pick a rock up. But unless it has metal or chondrules in the window IT IS NOT A METEORITE AND THOSE ARENT FLOW LINES.

Im not saying all meteorites have visible metal and chondrules. I am saying you are not going to be successful at finding any meteorite until you learn to identify the "common" ones. You will find a thousand meteorites that have free metal and chondrules to every one you find without. And you will spend years finding your first one unless you hunt known strewn fields.

So start with baby steps. Looking for meteorites out in the wilds will teach you about terrestrial rocks and that is good. But it teaches nothing about meteorites. You can only learn what fusion crust, chondrules and flow lines look like by observing real meteorites. And you must touch a few too. 

Forget about shapes and flow lines in the field. Stick every dark rock with a magnet and streak every one that sticks. Look for free metal and chondrules. If you don't see that chunk it over your shoulder. Pretty quick you will recognize the familiar faces of terrestrial iron and you won't need to bother streaking the rock. 

Sooner or later you will find free metal. Then we can talk about slag and artifacts. 

A thousand hours later you will wind up in a strewn field somewhere and find one. But by the time you actually find one you won't need to test it or ask anyone here. You will know what it is the instant you see it.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Or you can focus on meteorite gas ventilation lines.
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You bet 

I will spend more time doing research to help with identifying free metal and chondrules 

I like the wax idea.yes my termonalgy is weak, I got lots of learning to do.

Thank you for your help I appreciate it. 

Cheers

 

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8 hours ago, Wahib said:

  I would like to learn more about the differences between meteorite  gas vapor ventilation lines and terrestrial rocks vapor ventilation lines if there is such thing. 

Cheers.

Slag has gases escape too but they push the hole out, leaving a lipped rim around the hole. A meteorite expands while under atmospheric pressure,  so the holes are pressed down by the air. Slag will have holes with rims and meteorites always have flat holes.

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3 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

So slag isn't affected by atmospheric pressure?  Interesting physics!

The pressure is negligible at sea level. 99% of the earth is the same hundred minerals so I will get mineral tests on my rocks if suspect from now on. I am talking about the most detailed scientific analyses of origin possible.

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But the pressure is greater higher up in the atmosphere?  Dude, you continue to make little to no sense.

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32 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

But the pressure is greater higher up in the atmosphere?  Dude, you continue to make little to no sense.

It can be hard to follow. Compression and vacuum forces suck and push every atom into the main mass as a normal force relative to the direction of travel. That is why oriented meteorites have a trailing edge that looks different, the vacuum in front of the compression at an angle that matches the direction of travel. It is just my common sense.

Wind is invisible, hard to comprehend what we cant see. But further, the compression can be turbulent depending on the material consistency. This turbulence is what forms the glypts in a chaotic manner relative to the molecular stiffness.

I am just good at science, I need 2 classes to get a degree in general education and I am looking into becoming a doctor specializing in meteorites. That way one day I will be the one who tells what is what. I hope I can somehow get into the international association as well.

It was a freak accident for me to stumble upon "slag" in the forest that led to my research and I can tell you that not every scientist knows every aspect. I have the added motivation of being a normal rock collector as well.:alcoholic:

Edited by WillM
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 I have been in the trades for most of my life and few months in hunting for something, I haven't found it yet.lol

but I would like to thank you all for your experienced opinion I value and appreciate the time,and effort that you all put in.

Im looking forward to learning more and hope one day I can find  my own space nugget and have the same experience .

Cheers

 

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