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Raw Uranium Ore


JOHNM

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Going to a place tomorrow  that has a lot of uranium mines . I don't want to hold onto radioactive rocks.  looked at some pictures on this site and others. One site said grayish colored. one picture was yellow. more info would be great. And what would radioactive material do to a detector?

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34 minutes ago, JOHNM said:

Going to a place tomorrow  that has a lot of uranium mines . I don't want to hold onto radioactive rocks.  looked at some pictures on this site and others. One site said grayish colored. one picture was yellow. more info would be great. And what would radioactive material do to a detector?

Most uranium ores are only mildly radioactive. Wouldn't harm a detector in any way. Some.uranium ores are fluorescent under shortwave - longwave lamps and fluoresce a bright green.

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If you have a small sample of the yellow ore, it could be panned and if it ends up at the bottom, then it could be.  This is far from proving it is an ore, but a poor man's indication.  Much more to do after that.

Once in a while I end up with a yellow colored rock at the bottom of my black sand, so it was heavier than those.  I'd crush it with pliers to see if it was gold.  I suspect that rock was a little bit of uranium ore.  There were some uranium claims, since expired, staked out a few miles from my claim. If this yellow rock was carnotite, or some other uranium ore, it ended up at the bottom of the black sand because it was denser than the black sands  I'm far from positive this was uranium ore, but I think it could have been.

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Find out what type of ore was being mined in the area. There are many ways that uranium can form. 

I have seen placer beach sand deposits, hard rock mines and in situ circulation operations. Any or all can be employed to extract uranium.

What you need is a scintillator. You look into it and it flashes when a particle hits the screen. It will lead you directly to the source in a hurry. 

You can get a cheap Geiger counter that will help sniff it out too. Either one is a bunch of fun but a scintillator tube is the best. 

Most ores are yellow or black. Yellow layers of placer sand in sandstone or black minerals in an ore body. So that will give you a general idea of how to prospect uranium.

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Most Uranium ore is  not radio active enough to be a major health threat.  Hell Salt Substitute  can be just about as radio active as some.  Did you know Bananas are radio active ?  LOL

 

Pick your self up one of these CHEAPO Geiger Counters.   I play with one from time to time .   https://www.banggood.com/Assembled-DIY-Geiger-Counter-Kit-Module-Miller-Tube-GM-Tube-Nuclear-Radiation-Detector-p-1136883.html?rmmds=myorder&cur_warehouse=CN

 

Potassium Chloride
 
Radioactive Salt Substitute:
Salt substitutes contain Potassium Chloride, rather than Sodium Chloride (common table salt). As it turns out, approximately 0.01% of the Potassium found in nature is Potassium-40, a radioactive isotope with a half life of 1.28 billion years.
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13 hours ago, homefire said:

Most Uranium ore is  not radio active enough to be a major health threat.  Hell Salt Substitute  can be just about as radio active as some.  Did you know Bananas are radio active ?  LOL

 

Pick your self up one of these CHEAPO Geiger Counters.   I play with one from time to time .   https://www.banggood.com/Assembled-DIY-Geiger-Counter-Kit-Module-Miller-Tube-GM-Tube-Nuclear-Radiation-Detector-p-1136883.html?rmmds=myorder&cur_warehouse=CN

 

Potassium Chloride
 
Radioactive Salt Substitute:
Salt substitutes contain Potassium Chloride, rather than Sodium Chloride (common table salt). As it turns out, approximately 0.01% of the Potassium found in nature is Potassium-40, a radioactive isotope with a half life of 1.28 billion years.

Short term exposure to uranium ores isn't an issue. Long term exposure is. A few puffs of a cigarette wouldn't hurt you but you can be sure of some health issues after 30-40 years or even sooner. Same with uranium ores. 

We had a long time member of this forum who mined uranium ores and passed away much too soon from that type of exposure.

 

Edited by Morlock
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Today, uranium is a rather worthless ore.  It is about $30 or so per pound.  That is already processed, and not the raw ore itself.  The uranium is nothing that you could make money off of without large scale mining.

I had been excited when I first found that little yellow rock, thinking if I found a vein, it'd be worth it.  I saw the price and thought at first that was what I could get per pound out of the vein, but Chris Ralph posted that the price was actually for processed ore.  Not sure how processed it actually is, but I don't think its to the point where its put in fuel rods, but ready for the next stage.

Each time I go prospecting, its in the hope of finding something I could make a living off of.  So far, the closest its been is gold, and I am by means successful at finding that,  I hope to find something like turquoise.  Thought i did, but turned out to be a much more common copper ore chrysocolla .Would be nice to find something my wife could turn into jewelry.

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46 minutes ago, chrisski said:

 

Each time I go prospecting, its in the hope of finding something I could make a living off of.  So far, the closest its been is gold, and I am by means successful at finding that,  I hope to find something like turquoise.  Thought i did, but turned out to be a much more common copper ore chrysocolla .Would be nice to find something my wife could turn into jewelry.

There's a small market for uranium mineral specimens. Value depends on species, size, etc. Not going to make anyone rich though. Chrysocolla has value as well. If you're in a particular area and you find something, why not pack up what you can and try to get some $$$  for it? Arizona is a mineral collectors dream. Fluorescent mineral specimens can bring in some big $$$$$ as well. I see all kinds of possibilities.

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Problem for me would be getting the chrysocolla out of the quarts.  The Chryscocolla I found was inside quarts rock and a light green color.  The quarts is the hardest rock I've found out here.  Can't see how I'd get it out of the quarts rock.  I tried looking up removing gems from stones, but there's nothing useful I found on google or YouTube.  There was some on how to shape rough stones into jewels.  Its as if I'd reached the end of the internet on that.  Only idea I could come up with is my dremel. 

There's also a bit of black tourmaline, but that is all locked up in the same type of quarts, so I'm back to how to get the gem out without ruining the specimen.  Maybe acids, but can't find any instructions.  Black tourmaline is pretty cheap too.

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7 hours ago, Morlock said:

Short term exposure to uranium ores isn't an issue. Long term exposure is. A few puffs of a cigarette wouldn't hurt you but you can be sure of some health issues after 30-40 years or even sooner. Same with uranium ores. 

We had a long time member of this forum who mined uranium ores and passed away much too soon from that type of exposure.

 

Breathing in some Uranium Ore dust would be such a good Idea,  eaaa?

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I do in fact have some Uranium Ore sitting here in a coffee can oh say the last 20 some years.  Use it for a Door Stop.  LOL   The stuff doesn't produce much more activity then most any Granite can. 

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In New Mexico uranium ores and spills have been a huge problem. We mined a bunch of it and it is very common here.

It is a huge problem. In the water and in the dust around where it was mined and refined. And processed ore (yellow cake) turns up all over the place.

Mistakes and accidents mining uranium changed our state, our laws and severely impacted our mining industry. Not to mention the toll in life and health of an entire region.

Contrary to the misinformation posted here uranium ores release exponentially more radiation than granite, table salt and bananas. And a different kind too. They are (mostly) safe to handle but long term exposure is a very bad idea.

Anyone who is interested in the real scoop on prospecting and collecting radioactive minerals would do well to consult someone with experience and education on the subject. Most of the information posted here is just not good information.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Because most people cant tell the difference from BS posts and reality.
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