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Today, I was out for my 3rd time in an area where I recently found these nuggets...(1.2, .2, & 1.2 dwt) I was walking until my scoop is draging and sure enough I loose my balance and step on my coil while twisting. The next thing I hear is snap!!!  OH  💩.... Dang it ! ! !  I now find myself walking back to my rig with my tail between my legs. ☹️

I got to my ride and had enough cell service to call and order a new lower shaft. (ofcourse. . . I'm on a vacation)

My question is... Has anyone had any success in repairing this lower shaft?  I was thinking of holding it together with super glue then using a fiber glass mixture to bond it firmly together for strength.  Any thoughts?  Thanks

 

 

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Try useing P-& its good, you will have to let it set all night, but should work, on top off the super glue.  Grubstake

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8 hours ago, grubstake said:

Try useing P-& its good, you will have to let it set all night, but should work, on top off the super glue.  Grubstake

? ? ? Sorry. . . Don't know what "P-&" is. or maybe I haven't had enough coffee yeT

Edit - Found what you meant on Rob's forum . . . P-7 .  .  Thanks

Edited by NvAuMiner
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Yep, P-C 7 thats it, Epoxie. Grubstake

 

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Grubby is right on about PC7 can't beat it. I use a pieced of plastic from a laundry detergent bottle to mix the PC7 on and I weigh both A and B on my gold scales so 

I have the exact right amount of each. Don't be stingy put plenty on the pieces and for sure don't touch for 24 hours. 

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Both PC7 and JB Weld are the same stuff. Duro 1000 is even better. But none of it will stick to plastic. You might build it up enough for a repair but don't expect it to adhere to the surface. Wipe it good with acetone and then rough it all up with 80 grit paper and the epoxy might adhere a bit better. But the takeaway here is epoxy won't adhere to plastic. The best you can do with epoxy is build a "cast" around the break and hope it holds for a while. Sooner or later the glue will pop loose from the plastic.

The shafts are some type of thermoplastic. Probably nylon or pvc. If it softens when you get it hot it can be welded. Just use a like material for filler rod and get it just hot enough for the filler to coalesce with the part.

PVC and ldpe will soften with acetone. HDPE and Nylon won't. So you can narrow down what type of filler you need by rubbing a spot with a solvent rag. 

You can get a cheap welding kit from harbor freight with an assortment of rods and it is worth the pittance you will pay. A heat gun and a wood burner will get you there though. 

If it is PVC it can be solvent welded. It is tricky to get a strong joint unless you use a sleeve or coupling. 

All my detector poles are PVC pipe. When I break one I just replace it with a home made one. It is better than trying to fix a snapped piece. I have never broken a home made one and have broken a few factory ones. So there is that.

Just my two cents. 

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There are epoxies that adhere to plastic quite well- just look for it on the label.

Always, but always, I cross hatch the area to be glued with a razor knife, then coarse sandpaper, and then acetone or non lubricant ether(starting fluid).

I have even used brake cleaner in a pinch.

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Reinforcing with fiberglass drywall tape works wonders   , and adding microspheres is great at thickening runny epoxies that need a long set time.

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I used super glue to hold it together, then I ended up using Gorilla Glue (which is what I had on hand)  I  built up a complete cast around the outside from the holes on the coil ears to an inch down the shaft and was able to spread it on the inside as well.  I ground down the inside enough to slide the coil connector through.  It seems to be rock hard solid.  I installed the new lower shaft I bought but not before building up a cast around the outside like I did on my broken shaft for added strength.  I think it will be fine for a spare. 

Appreciate all the helpful ideas that I can fall back on if my attempt doesn't hold.

Doug

 

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