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WillM

Pink Diamond Suevite Breccia

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That's great. Now it turned itself into a diamond. Take it to jeweler or pawn shop for an appraisal to see how much it's worth.:rolleyes:

Edited by Morlock
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On 9/25/2019 at 2:06 PM, WillM said:

I actually think this is a shard from a glass maker. 

Agreed

 

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3 hours ago, WillM said:

It is corundum and it was good quality.

It looked highly fractured to me.

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18 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

It looked highly fractured to me.

Corundum doesn't have to be the best for a scratch test, I don't know where you are getting that from. 

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You did not scratch the corundum. The silica left a streak.

You really need to learn the basics bro. Honestly. :idunno:

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11 hours ago, WillM said:

Corundum doesn't have to be the best for a scratch test, I don't know where you are getting that from. 

The fractures are zones of weakness that can allow the tester to be gouged out, not because isn't as hard as the sample, but because it isn't as tough.

But just as likely, or moreso, your "diamond" left a streak, as Bob posited.

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1 hour ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

The fractures are zones of weakness that can allow the tester to be gouged out, not because isn't as hard as the sample, but because it isn't as tough.

But just as likely, or moreso, your "diamond" left a streak, as Bob posited.

Bless your heart Mr. Voice of reason!

A better indication of hardness would be to rub that "diamond" against a piece of Silicon carbide abrasive paper. Observe the streak color but also observe the small facet it cuts in the "diamond".

I bet my nuggets a piece of wet rub paper about 220 grit will cut a flat spot on the "diamond" and leave a white streak. Just like it did on the corundum.

WillM used a pointed corner of the specimen to streak. A lot better indicator of hardness would be to rub a broader face against the test material. The bearing surfaces are wider and will abrade rather than crush. And the scratches on the "diamond" will be easy to see. Not so when you use a sharp corner for your streak test. All you see is a fine line and it is difficult to tell if it is a scratch or a streak.

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On 9/26/2019 at 12:08 PM, WillM said:

 

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I would absolutely trust every mineral sample I got from someone who can't spell.

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On 9/27/2019 at 7:33 PM, Bedrock Bob said:

Bless your heart Mr. Voice of reason!

Well, shucks, tweren't nothing, just logical, I reckon. .

you're just too munificent in your mineralogic musings.Thanks for making mineralogy great again:)

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I need the crf and a getting a ride to go there. it lmao 

The hospital sucked

Edited by WillM
Typos

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Okay i got this diamond indicator, does that really mean its that much diamond? Gtfo here the device must be activated by quartz someone save my sanity.

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Quartz can be found just around anywhere, so I would recommend trying it on some localy found quarts samples.  I would like to know how that device works and I think it is through thermal and electrical conductivity, so perhaps you found something close.  I'm a little skeptical of $15 detectors whether they be for gold or diamonds.  This single Diamond Selector II of yours took the top 5 diamond selector devices, all five spots, one device.  That is another red flag for me of a marketer that created its own top 5 list to sell its product.

I'm no professional, but I think you've identified a design flaw in the device you bought.

Edited by chrisski

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1 minute ago, chrisski said:

Quartz can be found just around anywhere, so I would recommend trying it on some localy found quarts samples.  I would like to know how that device works and I think it is through thermal and electrical conductivity, so perhaps you found something close.  I'm a little skeptical of $15 detectors whether they be for gold or diamonds.  This single Diamond Selector II of yours took the top 5 diamond selector devices, all five spots, one device.  That is another red flag for me.

I'm no professional, but I think you've identified a design flaw in the device you bought.

Its too good of knews it worked on the smaller one too so i should get it really verify it, the quartz I have does not make it go off

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I really don't think its a diamond.  You could always take it to a pawn shop and see what they say.  I don't think it'd be nice though.  The picture makes it look like a piece of concrete, but when I magnify the picture it looks like an average piece of quarts I used to find in the glacial gravels in Massachusetts.  

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25 minutes ago, chrisski said:

I really don't think its a diamond.  You could always take it to a pawn shop and see what they say.  I don't think it'd be nice though.  The picture makes it look like a piece of concrete, but when I magnify the picture it looks like an average piece of quarts I used to find in the glacial gravels in Massachusetts.  

I have tessted it on another mineral, it just does not react as much,this machine goes above a reading and beeps for another reason lol

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On 10/23/2019 at 6:25 PM, WillM said:

I have tessted it on another mineral, it just does not react as much,this machine goes above a reading and beeps for another reason lol

This is a thermocouple reading I'm sure, it is a solid device in determining if the thermal conductivity is that of a diamond. It does this by sending and receiving a wave.  posted some pictures of one, even the fracture is flat. Who wants a meteorite diamond?

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Edited by WillM
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That is a chunk of bull quartz. The most abundant mineral on earth. One of the easiest to identify as well.

It looks nothing like a diamond nor does it have any properties of diamond. A simple streak test will prove that. 

 

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1 minute ago, Bedrock Bob said:

That is a common chunk of bull quartz. It looks nothing like a diamond and any quick field test will prove that. 

 

The machine does not react to quartz. It is not reacting to the tourmaline why make a diamond checker that would react to quartz?

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17 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

That is a chunk of bull quartz. The most abundant mineral on earth. One of the easiest to identify as well.

It looks nothing like a diamond nor does it have any properties of diamond. A simple streak test will prove that. 

 

It has a colorless luster when streaked.

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On 10/27/2019 at 7:57 AM, WillM said:

It has a colorless luster when streaked.

That is because it is quartz. Diamond leaves no streak. "Luster" has nothing to do with streak. It is a completely different physical characteristic. Another basic observational technique used to ID minerals. 

You should learn basic mineral ID instead of fishing for attention on this forum. Your time here could be spent actually learning how to do the tests instead of pretending. You seem to be more interested in the attention you get from making silly claims than learning about the rocks that you post. 

Your biggest handicap to learning is not your autism. It is your attitude. You are not a meteorite hunter nor a student of science. You are simply looking for attention from strangers on the internet.

Let's be friends Will. Lots of guys here are willing to talk and discuss things with you. But you are playing games. And guys get tired of that crap pretty quickly.

If you do a basic streak test on a piece of silicon carbide or ceramic abrasive paper your specimen will leave a streak. That streak will be colorless. It will also abrade a flat "facet" on your specimen. This shows that the abrasive "cut" the specimen.

A diamond will leave no streak. It is harder than the abrasive. You cannot grind a "facet" on a diamond with abrasive paper.

I just gave you a gift Will. I gave you real knowledge that you did not have before. 

What will you do with it Will? Will you still play games or will you acknowledge the results of the test?

Will you be a respected member of tis forum or will you be just another poster looking for attention by saying silly crap? 

You decide Will. All you must do is a proper streak test and accept the results. 

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56 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

That is because it is quartz. Diamond leaves no streak. "Luster" has nothing to do with streak. It is a completely different physical characteristic. Another basic observational technique used to ID minerals. 

You should learn basic mineral ID instead of fishing for attention on this forum. Your time here could be spent actually learning how to do the tests instead of pretending. You seem to be more interested in the attention you get from making silly claims than learning about the rocks that you post. 

Your biggest handicap to learning is not your autism. It is your attitude. You are not a meteorite hunter nor a student of science. You are simply looking for attention from strangers on the internet.

Let's be friends Will. Lots of guys here are willing to talk and discuss things with you. But you are playing games. And guys get tired of that crap pretty quickly.

If you do a basic streak test on a piece of silicon carbide or ceramic abrasive paper your specimen will leave a streak. That streak will be colorless. It will also abrade a flat "facet" on your specimen. This shows that the abrasive "cut" the specimen.

A diamond will leave no streak. It is harder than the abrasive. You cannot grind a "facet" on a diamond with abrasive paper.

I just gave you a gift Will. I gave you real knowledge that you did not have before. 

What will you do with it Will? Will you still play games or will you acknowledge the results of the test?

Will you be a respected member of tis forum or will you be just another poster looking for attention by saying silly crap? 

You decide Will. All you must do is a proper streak test and accept the results. 

I am only reporting a reading, I need the streak test or whatever, it might be a diamond. I am waiting because I am broke to test the Venusian potassium/thorium material for oxygen isotope. That will tell me if it's Venusian for sure.

Edited by WillM

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Can this discussion be moved to the rock and mineral subforum?  Has 0 to do with meteorites.

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5 hours ago, WillM said:

I am only reporting a reading, I need the streak test or whatever, it might be a diamond. I am waiting because I am broke to test the Venusian potassium/thorium material for oxygen isotope. That will tell me if it's Venusian for sure.

 

3 hours ago, Mikestang said:

Can this discussion be moved to the rock and mineral subforum?  Has 0 to do with meteorites.

Will I agree with Bob, Mike and many others here, you have no evidence what so ever that what you have is a meteorite from anywhere in outer space much less Venus, so I will move this topic to the Rocks, Minerals And Fossils forum....however IF and only IF you do come up with concrete or asphalt proof that convinces all other members that what you have is really a meteorite I will move the topic back to this forum.

I will also leave a link in this forum section to this topic so it will be easier to find.

 

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On 9/18/2019 at 9:00 AM, WillM said:

I went back and there seemed to be some buried under the grass, and some spead out on purpose between bushes. I only thought it was diamond because I found a dark gray clastic matrix with a cubic crystal inside *attached nearby, it also had strongly magnetic iron inclusions.

 I took a picture of how deep the "quartz" go and the deeper the more pink it was. It is probably deeper. I found a new little meteorite today that has glypts, and a bigger one with a clear crust and a hole that shows air went into it, both slightly magnetic, I attached photos of them also.

Suevite is country rock and meteorite, getting them mixed up with display quartz seems natural, however how some of the quartz is pink itself is weird. A diamond checker might not even do. I will have to suspend study of this until I can get a graduated cylinder to check the density.  Otherwise it looks like sloppy landscaping.

If you ask me, flat holes with no lip around the rim is diagnostic of a meteorite. Bubbles pop, and they leave evidence that they did so. This evidence is material leading into the air gap at a curve. Meteorite holes get flattened by air as they expand,  that is also where glypts come from

 

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One of those is a chunk of asphalt from an old road or parking lot. The rest are pieces of industrial slag. Not only are they not meteorites, they are all man made.

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On 9/20/2019 at 8:21 AM, WillM said:

I feel like nobody is going to want to accept this, but I have been saving it for a while now for exposure to the public. I think this is a meteorite without chemical data,  and I doubt with certainty that someone here will be able to explain rationally what this is without saying it is extra terrestrial. 

This is an oblong, flat, glypted, crusted pice of material. One side is smoother and one side is rocky. You can tell it is crusted because the interior is a completely different color than the tan crust. It has cracks, but it does not fall apart. It is magnetic throughout in different amounts and it has rusty spots. It is a brecciated matrix and that suggests collision.  These are all meteoric features, some would say that they are "characteristic" of meteorites. It has giant clasts that are vesicular. This looks like a meteorite from an impact on a body with no atmosphere. The giant clasts are meteorites in a meteorite. The clasts seem to be glypted with the rest of the matrix. The giant clasts are different magnetism than the matrix. One of the giant clasts repels a neodymium magnet on it's sides!

Please don't tell me this is slag, please dont tell me this is pavement. It was in the ground. It was far too heavy to have been put there by a person. The giant clasts were around the area, from breaking up and shock from impact. They don't make roads with giant vesicular clasts. They don't put giant pieces of slag on the surface of cement. This is 1 million percent not man-made. The sides would have had to be broken to get it to have this kind of shape, snd there is no evidence this was broken up all around on the sides. 

This has to be a meteorite, and I want to give it to science. I don't want to have to have this be the first one I sell. But like I said, I have to commission more research. Using the internet and digital images to identify a chemical is farfetched. I am not trying to prove the reality through people's opinion on so little data. At most, I am able to discern if this is worth pursuing or not to bring more data to the table for proof. Which, consequentially costs money itself. 

Thank you, everyone.

:200:

 

 

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Good lord. Just stop. This is pavement. It’s not too heavy to have been put there by men. Old bits of concrete, asphalt, and other building materials are very often used as filler when grading properties prior to construction. I can go dig a hole in my yard right now and find bits of asphalt, concrete, and old bricks.

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