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18 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

I think the chemicals have already spoken.

I am getting an oxygen isotope analysis "special Venus identifier, because of the atmosphere). I am getting a piece of corundum to actually check my piece of 'glass" that has the density of diamond.

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This topic is sorta a "conundrum", but I don't think you can scrape your "diamond" on it.

This topic is a catsasstrophe as well as a corundum. A real abdomination.     

Shoot. You’re right. So here, I found a meteorite of my very own! It must have been part of the same fall because it looks nearly identical! It’s got giant clasts, impact fractures, fusion crust, and

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1 minute ago, WillM said:

I am getting an oxygen isotope analysis "special Venus identifier, because of the atmosphere). I am getting a piece of corundum to actually check my piece of 'glass" that has the density of diamond.

While you are doing that Google "conchoidal fracture". Then take a look at your diamond and do some observations.

 

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30 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

While you are doing that Google "conchoidal fracture". Then take a look at your diamond and do some observations.

 

I forgot to tell you, it is planar fracture and has clasts. But the jewelers always give me a hard time about chemical/scratch testing. The little one has hair-like flow lines. The other ones probably aren't real though. Based on the english language, the little one is real.

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29 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

What does any of this have to do with meteorites?  It appears nothing.

Each line is a pit, the face has a radial pit pattern on the shoulder, cresting the edge in some places. You can't deny the radial lines. 

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3 hours ago, WillM said:

Each line is a pit, the face has a radial pit pattern on the shoulder, cresting the edge in some places. You can't deny the radial lines. 

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This is glass slag, a lot of times if a house burns down you can find melted masses in the rubble or where one used to be. They are neat because they usually take in grass and other foilage before cooling.

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8 minutes ago, Jake7291 said:

This is glass slag, a lot of times if a house burns down you can find melted masses in the rubble or where one used to be. They are neat because they usually take in grass and other foilage before cooling.

I actually think this is a shard from a glass maker. The glass looks stretched and cut, probably was stuck to their pants from glassworking, and they dropped it walking.

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That's a pretty big discovery.  Until now, the only meteoritic diamonds that have been discovered is extremely tiny.  The carbon atoms in the form of graphite on the meteor had been realigned at the molecular level on impact into diamonds, but the diamonds were only microscopic. In fact so microscopic, they can't be seen but are suspected because some sames are harder to cut than it should be, 

I can only imagine the force of that meteor you found when it hit, to produce not just something visible, but a diamond of several carrots.  Perhaps this diamond is a remnant from one of the meteors causing the extinction level events.

https://slate.com/technology/2016/03/asteroid-impacts-create-tiny-diamonds.html

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21 minutes ago, WillM said:

It scratches corundum

 This is 100% without a doubt a meteorite diamond! Here we go with the disbelief lol

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It's not a diamond no matter what you say. Sorry.

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9 minutes ago, Morlock said:

It's not a diamond no matter what you say. Sorry.

Sorry to dissappoint everyone, but it has scoured corundum, a mineral that can be scratched by no other...

Thinking it isn't, is thinking it is in a way. That's why this is going to a woman and not for sale. 

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3 minutes ago, WillM said:

Sorry to dissappoint everyone, but it has scoured corundum, a mineral that can be scratched by no other...

Thinking it isn't, is thinking it is in a way. That's why this is going to a woman and not for sale. 

So you just happened to have a piece of corundum laying around to test it? I don't buy it. Take a pic of the corundum.

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17 minutes ago, Morlock said:

So you just happened to have a piece of corundum laying around to test it? I don't buy it. Take a pic of the corundum.

It was 3 days off of ebay they even sent free rocks. I don't even know what the rocks really are. That curved line is the scratch, the scour thst you can make out, and the quartz shattered when I tried it. It's fusion crust must be strong and stops the parts that look pointy from scratching the corundum easily

 

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1 hour ago, Morlock said:

You don't even know what a meteorite looks like and now you say you've found a diamond as well. Obviously it isn't no matter what you say. 

It absolutley has to be. Burned up at the perfect time. You can't explain the cleavage otherwise. 

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28 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Take it to a jewelry store or pawn shop for evaluation. Prepare to be disappointed.

They won't believe it but the cleavage is there. And the only other things that scratch corundum that look like diamonds are conchoidal, I didn't just cut the hardest rock and it's not a diamond.

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4 hours ago, Morlock said:

So you just happened to have a piece of corundum laying around to test it? I don't buy it. Take a pic of the corundum.

I am guessing that the conundrum:inocent: is not the best quality.

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11 hours ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

I am guessing that the conundrum:inocent: is not the best quality.

It is corundum and it was good quality. What about the flat fracture with the hardness don't people get lol. It couldn't  cleave like that and be glass. The conundrum is low quality.

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1 hour ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

Did you cleave,fracture it? Maybe it eroded that way or some country rock forced it to be that shape.

 

The cleavage with the flow lines suggests it was compromised while hot in the atmosphere, the very last piece that is left from a meteor that burned up, the axial twist of the cleavage suggests that it is also a spalling feature. The fractures have a residue from heating up. The edges have pits too somehow. It was found near a tree. It was on the surface.

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18 minutes ago, WillM said:

The cleavage with the flow lines suggests it was compromised while hot in the atmosphere, the very last piece that is left from a meteor that burned up, the axial twist of the cleavage suggests that it is also a spalling feature. The fractures have a residue from heating up. The edges have pits too somehow. It was found near a tree. It was on the surface.

 

15 hours ago, Morlock said:

Take it to a jewelry store or pawn shop for evaluation. Prepare to be disappointed.

Ditto.

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2 minutes ago, Morlock said:

 

Ditto.

You can't deny this website though:

https://www.thediamondauthority.org/how-to-identify-a-raw-diamond/

"Scratch Test

Luckily for those who want to know how to identify a raw diamond on the spot, there is a final test method that is reliable and effective. Typically, it is done by rubbing the suspected diamond on a synthetic ruby or sapphire (corundum) plate. Because they are just below diamonds on the hardness scale, rubies and sapphires are the perfect material to test a possible diamond with. Simply put, there is no other material that would scratch a plate of the kind. Logically, if the stone scratches the plate, it is an authentic diamond"

 

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