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4 hours ago, Dave's Not Here said:

You are welcome, Bob. And thanks for the follow up lesson and info.

I was pretty aggressive with the "window" knowing that it was likely it was not a meteorite. What care should be taken if someday I happen to find stumble on a meteorite? I would guess marring the specimen would diminish it's value. 

 

Thanks!

 

Dave

Dave,

I would imagine that some meteorites could be damaged from the heat if you were too aggressive with a grinder. And some meteorites have such a perfect shape that a window might damage their beauty and value. But as a general rule a little window does not devalue a meteorite.

Grinding a window does not usually give you the opportunity to observe the streak and may change the look of the interior with heat.... I see where yours turned a little blue. But if you do use a grinder just do it slowly with some coolant if you can. Your coolant will show the streak color and you won't overheat. Then a series of little 1/4" X 1" X 12" sticks with quality paper glued to them will polish up the window fast. It only takes a few minutes to put a mirror polish on the ground face with a few dollars worth of sandpaper.

I do it by hand because it generally takes only a few strokes before the streak makes it obvious. A window is rarely needed. Once you determine that the specimen streaks in greys  (various magnetites) and red (various hematites) you don't need to dig any further. If you grind down through the crust or cortex and the interior does not want to reveal a streak color then the iron in the specimen is not oxidized and a window may be needed to look for metal flecks.

Once in a while you see free metal in a specimen and that is when your learning curve goes straight up. You will be learning about all the different forms of slag from various cutting and welding, smelting and foundry operations out there. Some of them look really spacey. Those can be a bit more challenging to identify and may take further investigation. But differentiating these is easy when you keep in mind that these rocks formed in a  pressurized oxygen rich environment and formed bubbles. Since that does not happen in the vacuum of space you can generally ID most earthly artifacts like slag by the porosity. 

You can positively (or negatively) identify every rock that sticks to a magnet like this. If it passes this basic test and observations your stone is truly a suspect meteorite and warrants further investigation.

At this point an XRF nickel test is about the only thing a guy could do to "test" the specimen. With the appropriate nickel content the stone is sent for classification by experts in the field. There are no "meteorite testers" out there that can do a definitive test for a meteorite. Classification and identification is done by experts in the meteoritics field based on the physical and chemical characteristics of each individual specimen. And it is often more about physical characteristics and appearance than it is about test results, data and metrics.

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1 hour ago, Au Seeker said:

Dave welcome to the forum!

To answer your question even though I'm not a certified meteorite dirt monkey, filing a window on any meteorite will not affect any potential value it may have.

Skip,

You may not be certified yet but you are at least a third year apprentice. The interns should be getting your coffee.

I have always thought of you as a gravel gorilla. A gold gibbon. A schisty ol' rock ape. 

monk.jpg

 

Maybe a stone bonobo?

 

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34 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Skip,

You may not be certified yet but you are at least a third year apprentice. The interns should be getting your coffee.

I have always thought of you as a gravel gorilla. A gold gibbon. A schisty ol' rock ape. 

monk.jpg

 

Maybe a stone bonobo?

 

Bob, I am certified in digging in the dirt looking for gold and other treasures just not so much on meteorites.

That being said where in the world did you find that photo of me with such a short beard and mustache, it must be a very old photo because I never remembered my facial hair ever being that short, not to mention the hair on my head??? :89:

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On 8/26/2019 at 12:08 PM, Meteorite Tester said:

... maybe due to my age and failing eyesight.

Sorry for the post jack but we could benefit from better vision ... NAC

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25 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

Sorry for the post jack but we could benefit from better vision ... NAC

Hey Stillbeaver! How the heck are you man?

Do you want to argue about something? Throw some insults? Piss up a tree?

This Meteorite Tester guy was too easy. Hardly any sport at all. I'm just not done yet.

Wanna give it a go? 

:4chsmu1:

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1 hour ago, Au Seeker said:

Bob, I am certified in digging in the dirt looking for gold and other treasures just not so much on meteorites.

That being said where in the world did you find that photo of me with such a short beard and mustache, it must be a very old photo because I never remembered my facial hair ever being that short, not to mention the hair on my head??? :89:

Those baby pictures always come back to haunt us don't they? :25r30wi:

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11 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

I say we all came from meteors...

What kind of baboon logic did you use to come up with that conclusion?

You ignorant dirt monkey.

Anyone with half a medulla oblongata knows we came from the underworld when the juniper tree broke open the bedrock. Crawled out of the earth like ants we did!

Meteors. Pffft.

:rolleyes:

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The elements of the periodic table(on this planet) all came from space rocks,meteors, if you will, and assembled into our solar system- which we are   a product of.

Shirley, you cannot argue with that.

Sorry  I called you Shirley,  Bob.

Have you nipped a dram or two? You seem to be in rare form...

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34 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

Shirley, you cannot argue with that..

Shirley can argue with anything...

We could not have come from meteors. Meteors do not contact the earth. When they do they become meteorites. 

Meteoric material could not have been our origin. It all burned up in the atmosphere. Only meteoritic material makes it to the surface of the earth. 

So you are wrong.

Again. 

Meteoritic material may have been the origin of the rocks and the juniper. Even the elements that made up the people that came out of the crack in the ground. But a person is not the assemblage of elements he is comprised of. What makes "us" is much more than atoms and molecules that originated in some cosmic calamity. It Is divine. It is much more accurately represented in myth and fable than by the cold mechanics of physics.

So "we" did not come from "meteors" nor did the material that accreted from stardust lump together to make "us".

Any dirt monkey that can pick schist out of his fissure knows that!

 

I don't drink my friend. But I am in fine form tonight. I'm not sure why. 

Just a pathetic dirt monkey with limited intelligence havin' a little fun!

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It all depends on your perspective.... and objectivity.

At what point was our planet "Earth"?

Prior to that, "Earth" was a lump in the accretion disc around the sun (amongst other lumps).  Were incoming "meteors" changed to "meteorites " when they glommed on at that point? 

Were etymologists arguing the distinction ?.I think not

Whichever term suits your fancy, you  must agree that without the beginning ingredients, you'll have no cake.

You are being too subjective, as usual.

 

 

 

 

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54 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

It all depends on your perspective.... and objectivity.

At what point was our planet "Earth"?

Prior to that, "Earth" was a lump in the accretion disc around the sun (amongst other lumps).  Were incoming "meteors" changed to "meteorites " when they glommed on at that point? 

Were etymologists arguing the distinction ?.I think not

Whichever term suits your fancy, you  must agree that without the beginning ingredients, you'll have no cake.

You are being too subjective, as usual.

 

 

 

 

I disagree. :25r30wi:

 

For all practical purposes earth became "earth" when it accreted enough mass to differentiate and become a planet. At that point anything that got caught in the gravitational pull of the earth could be considered a meteor. And anything that actually made landfall a meteorite. Before that it was just matter getting together and growing. So most of the matter on the planet was here long before the first chunk of rock fell on the newly differentiated earth. That was the first meteorite.

At some point out there after the planets were formed a couple other differentiated bodies collided and caused "The Great Bombardment". But that was long after earth had already accreted, differentiated and became a "planet". This is the period when most  meteorites came our way. Long after all the elements were in place.

So while some meteoritic material could possibly have influenced life on earth, all the building blocks we see on earth were here long before that. 

Even if we can agree that every atom on the earth originated from the sky we can not pretend that it rode on a "meteor" to get here. Quite the opposite. Our gravity and mass create the "meteors". Not the other way around.

I will admit that without the ingredients there is no cake. But you must admit that cakes come from the bakery. Not from a wheat field. If you can admit this then it should not be too difficult to understand that we do not come from meteorites either. 

:rolleyes:

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3 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

I disagree. :25r30wi:

That's all you got? Your verbosity is suddenly verklempt?

Even the divine needs some baking soda and flour to work with.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bedrock Bob said:

 

So you are wrong.

 

Again. 

Meteoritic material may have been the origin of the rocks and the juniper. Even the elements that made up the people that came out of the crack in the ground.

 

First you contradict, then agree.

When are you going to argue?

A contradiction is a poor excuse for an arguement. Monty told me so.

Nice edit, by the way..

 

Edited by Stillweaver hillbelli
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7 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

A contradiction is a poor excuse for an arguement. 

No its not.  :25r30wi:

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5 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

 

Bob I have always wondered how you developed your argumentative methodology, now I know, Monty Python who would of thought! 

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22 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

 If you can admit this then it should not be too difficult to understand that we do not come from meteorites either. 

:rolleyes:

Ok, we came from the Niburu Bakery:Diggin_a_hole: and that is where we got our alien DNA.:shhhhh:

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