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garikfox

Bring a four legged friend?

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Does anyone bring their dog(s) with them out metal detecting?

Since i'm so new to all this and my dog has never been outside off a leash yet i'm hesitant to take him with me. But i know he'd love every "sniff!

How do you keep them away from cactus? I'm assuming you can't.

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Posted (edited)

Hi my name is Boomer! I'm 3yrs old and my owner thinks i'm a american staff./sharpei.

boom1.jpg

I want to go prospecting really bad with my owner, he likes to dig rocks and I like to smell them. I don't think he'll let me go because he thinks I will smell this plant called a cactus and my mouth will end up looking like a angry porcupine.

 

I've begged to go.

boom4.JPG

 

Occasionally I sneak inside this motorized human buggy.

boom2.jpg

 

I also got crazy and found my own buggy.

boom5.JPG

Edited by garikfox
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Good looking dog...but, unless he is snake trained I would leave him at home. Plus, you will be spending a LOT of time digging cacti out of his paws/face and keeping track of him. You have to concentrate on detecting. :) You could always take him out in the desert on a leash and let him get his fair share of sniffing done that way.  Dogs are great..but they are like little kids. 


Tom H.

 

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Cholla cacti at LSD is very easy for a human or dog to tangle with.  Painful and time consuming to rectify....  

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He looks like a nice guy!

Dogs are a huge pain prospecting. It is hard to focus on what you are doing. 

Some of them are no problem but most of them wind up getting into trouble. I take mine everywhere and he is always getting sprayed by a skunk, eating some rodent or chasing an elk for miles over the mountain. Never a dull moment. 

Dogs are cool and I usually take him with me even though it makes life a lot more difficult. I don't let him run free anymore. I try to keep him on a rope. He still manages to get into trouble and eat something vile or roll in a dead carcass.

They figure most of it out pretty quickly. The sakes, ticks and foxtail grass are the main things you need to watch for.  They will get cactus in their nose once in a while or hurt a foot/break a toenail. It is generally no big deal as long as you check them over good and address any problems right away. 

I always keep a syringe of dexamethasone in case he gets bit by a snake or injured really badly. It is an anti inflammatory that often makes a big difference if you give it to them early. My vet measured it out and gave me instructions on how to use it. If you are a couple hours away from vet care and something bad does happen it will really help. Ask your vet about it. I did and dexamethasone is what he recommended.

There has also been a lot of bad water the past few summers. Cyanobacteria in water can kill an animal quickly. Several ponds and stock tanks around here get toxic in hot weather. I try my best to keep him out of any stagnate water. Even stock tanks and ponds. If it isn't moving water or a big lake we avoid it.

Where I detect is pretty barren country. It is hot with little shade in the summer. My dog gets miserable long before I am ready to give up and go home. So I take it pretty easy and try not to get too serious about prospecting when it is hot. In the winter he loves to go all day and there are a lot fewer animals and snakes to worry about. So I take him more often in the winter and there is a lot less stress.

Bob

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I think after reading everything i'll just leave him at home lol. 

Thanks guys :) yeah he's a great dog, I've had him for 2yrs. He loves Human's. lol

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Posted (edited)

"Okay you guys go dig rocks i will rest"

IMG_0211.JPG

Edited by garikfox
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8 hours ago, garikfox said:

I think after reading everything i'll just leave him at home lol. 

Thanks guys :) yeah he's a great dog, I've had him for 2yrs. He loves Human's. lol

I agree it's best for them to leave them at home if you're going to be distracted metal detecting....but if you plan on just going out to check out areas to see if they  would be good for future metal detecting for sure take him along and on a leash, at least until he gets used to all the hazards of the desert, and for sure check out on getting him "Snake Trained", I'm sure there's someone who does this training somewhere near you, even if you have to drive a ways to find someone it's well worth it for your best friend's safety!!

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8 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

He looks like a nice guy!

Dogs are a huge pain prospecting. It is hard to focus on what you are doing. 

Some of them are no problem but most of them wind up getting into trouble. I take mine everywhere and he is always getting sprayed by a skunk, eating some rodent or chasing an elk for miles over the mountain. Never a dull moment. 

Dogs are cool and I usually take him with me even though it makes life a lot more difficult. I don't let him run free anymore. I try to keep him on a rope. He still manages to get into trouble and eat something vile or roll in a dead carcass.

They figure most of it out pretty quickly. The sakes, ticks and foxtail grass are the main things you need to watch for.  They will get cactus in their nose once in a while or hurt a foot/break a toenail. It is generally no big deal as long as you check them over good and address any problems right away. 

I always keep a syringe of dexamethasone in case he gets bit by a snake or injured really badly. It is an anti inflammatory that often makes a big difference if you give it to them early. My vet measured it out and gave me instructions on how to use it. If you are a couple hours away from vet care and something bad does happen it will really help. Ask your vet about it. I did and dexamethasone is what he recommended.

There has also been a lot of bad water the past few summers. Cyanobacteria in water can kill an animal quickly. Several ponds and stock tanks around here get toxic in hot weather. I try my best to keep him out of any stagnate water. Even stock tanks and ponds. If it isn't moving water or a big lake we avoid it.

Where I detect is pretty barren country. It is hot with little shade in the summer. My dog gets miserable long before I am ready to give up and go home. So I take it pretty easy and try not to get too serious about prospecting when it is hot. In the winter he loves to go all day and there are a lot fewer animals and snakes to worry about. So I take him more often in the winter and there is a lot less stress.

Bob

Yes indeed dogs are extra work, even our old hank who knows his way around the desert after years of trail and error, we also keep hank on a rope or try to. Last weekend camping at Pyramid lake we wake up to go old hank finishing off some old nasty brats out of an old fire pit. Yum! :sickbyc:

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7 hours ago, garikfox said:

"Okay you guys go dig rocks i will rest"

IMG_0211.JPG

He looks like he is being mistreated in this photo. You can see the stress and unhappiness is overwhelming. :rolleyes:

 

Mine is the same way. Life is so tough for him that sometimes he rolls over on his back and wants to be rubbed on his chest. That is a sure sign that someone needs to call the SPCA and report the abuse.:)

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36 minutes ago, hardtimehermit said:

Yes indeed dogs are extra work, even our old hank who knows his way around the desert after years of trail and error, we also keep hank on a rope or try to. Last weekend camping at Pyramid lake we wake up to go old hank finishing off some old nasty brats out of an old fire pit. Yum! :sickbyc:

Campgrounds and roadsides. You never can tell what nastiness is hidden behind the bushes or in the fire pit. 

Pork chop bones. Those things will hurt a dog bad and they are laying all over the ground in every campsite in the West. Old diapers, household garbage, toxic crap, you name it. People toss it out. You can hardly travel with your dog anymore and stop at the convenient places on the road. Or anywhere people have camped. They have covered the ground with nasty stuff that you just can't let your dog get near.

Parvovirus is bad news and it is transmitted by dog crap. Tularemia, plague, parasites and most other dog diseases are transmitted by fleas. Exposure to dog crap and rodents with fleas are how a dog gets really sick. Adventure dogs are exposed all the time. The very best defense is keeping them on a rope. Otherwise sniffing dog turds and chasing ground rats will be their full time job.

Years ago I started getting creative about the places I stop for a break or to camp. I don't do rest stops or campgrounds anymore at all. The dog caused me to re-think every aspect of travelling and camping. No matter what is going on I drive that extra mile to find a clean spot to park. Tie the dog after a brief "prowl and growl" to stretch his legs. Then get fresh water. Then I watch him really close for a few minutes to see what he can find in his perimeter that I don't see. 

 

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0428190921a.jpg

My Sonoran Trout Hound goes on all my adventures.

He can smell a rattler a hundred feet away and makes certain to point them out for me since I can no longer hear the bastards. Just last night he let me know I had a diamondback in the horse corral.

He avoids cholla very well and has learned to remove it himself. Rarely has he needed my help plucking it.  I think he figured it out as a pup following along on trail rides if he was going to keep up.

Only time I won't bring him is where there's not enough water to mitigate this freaking heat.

He's 1/4 Heeler, 3/4 Mini Aussie so he easily fits into most overhead compartment bins.

 

 

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Sounds like he avoids Cholla like some people avoid Corolla  . . . :) Too bad there was no room in the saddlebags for him. :rolleyes:

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43 minutes ago, BMc said:

Sounds like he avoids Cholla like some people avoid Corolla  . . . :) Too bad there was no room in the saddlebags for him. :rolleyes:

I've tried to get him to just chill and ride in the saddle or a pannier but noooo

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