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garikfox

GPX-5000 timing question

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I've been reading and it seems certain timings are better with a certain type of coil. i.e DD or Mono.

Mono is best with Fine, enhance and Sen Smooth. And DD coils are best with Normal to Relic.

My question is, Is their any legitimacy to this below picture?

 

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In the Wickenburg area I use a mono coil, I have found a couple of places that have a lot of hot rocks, too much to effectively detect, so I will take my DD coil there next time.

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I only use a mono coil.  DD coils are heavier since they have roughly twice the amount of wire in them.  DD coils require side-to-side swing, mostly.  Mono coils are easier to stab under bushes in my opinion.  The field of a mono coil is conical and more 'pure' / 'un-disturbed',  the way I see it.  Greater depth and a smoother threshold, when the detector is set up correctly.  In my opionion.

Hot rocks are part of the game.  There is no getting away from them.  Unless the ground doesn't have any, then there may not be any gold as well.  I generally run sensitive extra no matter what size mono coil I'm running.  I've tried the other timings in certain situations, but usually end up back in sensitive extra.  I think I found gold one time using enhance, and a couple times with fine gold, the rest with SE.  The size and depth of the gold I find, leaves me thinking I'm not missing much.  There are multiple timings for a reason and you will have to get boots on the ground to answer that question for yourself.

When I'm digging 'hot rocks', the next one could be gold.  It's happened several times now and that's what I tell myself.  If you're not digging 'hot rocks' then you're probably missing gold.

There is some 'hot ground' in Arizona, but overall, it's mild to medium in most places.  Boots on the ground and hours passed swinging the coil is the wisdom you're looking for.

Good Luck !!  :thumbsupanim

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There also comes a point, where there is nothing new to read, no new questions to ask.  All that's left, is getting out there and figuring it out for yourself.  Anyone who's become a successful nugget shooter has been through it too. :)

One more tip if I may....   When you do get out there.  Bring one coil.  Sure, if your will power is strong, bring a 'back-up' to leave in the truck.  But try to resist the temptation to switch coils when frustration rises and patience declines.  Learn how to use that one coil in the environment you are detecting.  Try different timings, adjust the gain and stabilizer to get a smooth threshold.  There are lots of variables you'll have to learn to control/manage.  Sticking with one coil to start, will be a great help in understanding the other variables more quickly.  

If you choose a small coil, try to hunt places where a small coil has an advantage.  Places that are brushy and/or rocky are good examples.  Shallow ground with bedrock exposure. 

Want to use a larger coil?  The more open ground on hillsides might be a good place to start.  Try to tailor your day's hunt to the coil you are using.  Over time, you'll have some spots and you'll know what coil works 'best' there, based on your experiences and the circumstances.

Luke

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Thanks LukeJ

That's interesting that you can run Sens Extra in medium hot ground. There's a club claim that's marked as being too HOT for a metal detector. I went there with my Equinox 800, yep was hot ground for sure but was doable i thought. I was thinking about taking maybe a Detech 8"inch DD coil to that claim.

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Keep in mind that some of the 'club claim' reviews may be fairly old in relation to current technology.  Perhaps the author thought the ground was too hot for his VLF.  The GPX will handle the ground differently.  Main thing is you gotta go and check it out.  Don't try to max out the gain thinking you'll get more depth.  It's like high-beams in fog.  I usually run my gain within 1 or 2 numbers from the factory preset.  Many times, it's on the lower side.

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3 hours ago, LukeJ said:

There also comes a point, where there is nothing new to read, no new questions to ask.  All that's left, is getting out there and figuring it out for yourself.  Anyone who's become a successful nugget shooter has been through it too. :)

One more tip if I may....   When you do get out there.  Bring one coil.  Sure, if your will power is strong, bring a 'back-up' to leave in the truck.  But try to resist the temptation to switch coils when frustration rises and patience declines.  Learn how to use that one coil in the environment you are detecting.  Try different timings, adjust the gain and stabilizer to get a smooth threshold.  There are lots of variables you'll have to learn to control/manage.  Sticking with one coil to start, will be a great help in understanding the other variables more quickly.  

If you choose a small coil, try to hunt places where a small coil has an advantage.  Places that are brushy and/or rocky are good examples.  Shallow ground with bedrock exposure. 

Want to use a larger coil?  The more open ground on hillsides might be a good place to start.  Try to tailor your day's hunt to the coil you are using.  Over time, you'll have some spots and you'll know what coil works 'best' there, based on your experiences and the circumstances.

Luke

"Great" advice Luke,.....I might also add that it would be more important to bring an extra (charged) battery along instead of a different size coil.    It has "definitely" been my experience (and regret) in the past that I did not do this.  It has happened to me twice over the years where I no more than get to a possible spot, start swinging and within about an hour (or-so) my detector gives me a loud noise indicating that the battery is too low, and/or is die'ng.  Those batteries weaken over time due to usage, follow-up chagings, and re-usage.  And if you are way out in the bush, there's no point in "waist'n :2mo5pow:a good detecting day because you don't have a back up battery.  Gary  

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Good information thanks :) 

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Does anyone know what a GPX-5000 has that a GPX-4800 doesn't have? just curious

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Fine gold timing.

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29 minutes ago, LukeJ said:

Fine gold timing.

My dry washer has fine gold timing too ...

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  • Haha 2

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2 hours ago, adam said:

My dry washer has fine gold timing too ...

No doubt it's more effective.  :Diggin_a_hole:

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Lol. okay i see :) 

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