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Could this be a sandstone meteorite, Seriously


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So i guess im coming into this a little late.  Little back ground on myself i went to college for geology and i am in the process of obtaining my professional geologist license.   A few things th

I'm finally getting to you huh?  You need to get it in perspective buddy. Honestly. You are not going to convince anyone that your rock could possibly be a meteorite. You have given it your all. I

Just enjoy the fact that you are going to get a whole bunch of crap thrown your way for making statements like that.  You are correct that "the rock speaks for itself". And it is saying something

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Posted (edited)

Well, maybe another test to consider would be to put a piece of it in a hydraulic press- it probably would not hold up to much pressure before crumbling, even if it were not weathered.  Compare this to other chondrites, which survive shock pressures well over 5GPa (725,000 psi).  Can sandstone also survive those pressures necessary for the formation of shock minerals such as olivine to form inside its’ matrix? And for as soft as sandstone is, one would think that ablation would have been very fast and very complete with such soft material, as one can easily carve it with even a 60 psi sand blasting kit.

Also to consider,¬†sandstone is made up of quartz and feldspar, both of which melt at around 600¬įC, (1100¬įF), well below the typical temperatures meteors endure when they hit the atmosphere. If¬†this were¬†a meteorite, wouldn‚Äôt it¬†have been¬†encased in a hard, rather impervious fusion crust¬†shell of glass like material?¬†¬†Such a hard material as¬†glass¬†should also have been intact on its surface, and it¬†would have survived weathering far better than the¬†sandstone material in¬†it‚Äôs core. No,¬†sorry,¬†I don‚Äôt believe this is a meteorite.

Edited by GotAU?
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On 8/5/2019 at 2:50 PM, Odinxgen said:

Honestly though I'm just putting all informations together. I hope that everybody that's interested views the STONE-5 results above. It's specific on what happened to the sandstone. and I would like everybody that has seen all of the information on this topic to help me figure this out. 

Who are you?  What is your background?  This didn't jump out at me when I was skimming all the stuff and comments.  Did you put up a bio?  Are there any other forum members you have met?

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My background is unrelated except, I grew up in the badlands of Drumheller Alberta, was exploring early on and became interested in meteorites at 15. I'm 26 now and Ive been on about four hunts all amazing all fruitless or wrongs but that's just how things are. This stone came from my most recent hunt to the Manitoba Meteorite hotspot. it's a real place and probably the only place in the world one could just stumble on this kinda thing several unrecovered recentish falls and two ancient glaciers colliding along the border Coupled with the finds which if you locate them on google earth are in an actual line exactly where they are supposed to be. this stone was well within thoose bounds and following the trend perfectly

 

12 hours ago, GotAU? said:

Well, maybe another test to consider would be to put a piece of it in a hydraulic press- it probably would not hold up to much pressure before crumbling, even if it were not weathered.

Well I dropped it out of a five story building and it got scratched, much of the material was almost glued together and for example hitting it with a hammer produces a metallic ding rather than a thump. id say if this stone was when perfect more than able to withstand much higher than 5gpa 

 Compare this to other chondrites, which survive shock pressures well over 5GPa (725,000 psi).  Can sandstone also survive those pressures necessary for the formation of shock minerals such as olivine to form inside its’ matrix?

well Earth sandstones are great materials used in construction. Martian sandstones as an example because I believe this is a Martian Sandstone specifically. Is even more dense than our own, significantly enough to surprise NASA. So yeah I would say a Martian sandstone meteor if large enough would be similar in features but more resistant entering the atmosphere. and yes terrestrial sandstone is capable of surviving re-entry, 

And for as soft as sandstone is, one would think that ablation would have been very fast and very complete with such soft material, as one can easily carve it with even a 60 psi sand blasting kit.

this is actually partially metamorphic sandstone, its only slightly fused, you can see unmelted but lighter coloured sandgrains in the lighter color mineral veins - edit-

Also to consider,¬†sandstone is made up of quartz and feldspar, both of which melt at around 600¬įC, (1100¬įF), well below the typical temperatures meteors endure when they hit the atmosphere.

well according to stone 5, sand stone ablates, but it doesnt melt, so yeah likely fast ablation. can confirm that the stone turns red under a blow torch, the same red staining what i believe is the tail of the oriented  alleged meteorite allegedly.

If this were a meteorite, wouldn’t it have been encased in a hard, rather impervious fusion crust shell of glass like material? 

it actually was some images you can see the gloss of the meteorite but the skjinny top of the tear shaped sandstone broke easiest. the it kinda chipped off slowly from there as I gave fragments to friends and family.

 Such a hard material as glass should also have been intact on its surface, and it would have survived weathering far better than the sandstone material in it’s core. No, sorry, I don’t believe this is a meteorite.

there was, and is dialectic glass, glossy surface has lost its coat likely to all the chemicals ive used to wash it.

 

 

 

Edited by Odinxgen
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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, mn90403 said:

Who are you?  What is your background?  This didn't jump out at me when I was skimming all the stuff and comments.  Did you put up a bio?  Are there any other forum members you have met?

I'm the guy that is convinced that the research ive read is pointing to me finding a Martian sandstone. That is all, also I love rocks man.

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On 4/29/2020 at 10:35 PM, Fireball said:

I found one but smaller but there is iron in it to because It will stick to a magnet

Lets see this iron in sandstone. how the heck does a guy find a nickel test anyway. Mars has nickel that would put this whole thread to bed right?

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I also found this but it think it is magnetite .

4 hours ago, Odinxgen said:

Lets see this iron in sandstone. how the heck does a guy find a nickel test anyway. Mars has nickel that would put this whole thread to bed right?

 

2020-05-07 14.57.40.jpg

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How much do any of the 'meteorites' here (on this thread) resemble real meteorites listed here http://www.tucsonmeteorites.com/TMA.asp?QQ=!   ????

It might help if you think you have a meteorite to show it to a meteorite dealer and see how much they will offer you.

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2 hours ago, Fireball said:

I also found this but it think it is magnetite .

 

2020-05-07 14.57.40.jpg

Slag.

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2 hours ago, Fireball said:

2020-05-07 14.52.44.jpg

Unequivocally not a meteorite.

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5 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

Slag.

Lots of slag around railroads, old roads, etc. Not a meteorite, what else could it be besides magnetite if he found it out in a remote area away from trash? It does look like you are right though...

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2 hours ago, Fireball said:

2020-05-07 14.53.29.jpg

You can see the dark bands of magnetite (iron oxide) in this cross section - that’s what is causing it to be magnetic.

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1 hour ago, GotAU? said:

You can see the dark bands of magnetite (iron oxide) in this cross section - that’s what is causing it to be magnetic.

 

1 hour ago, GotAU? said:

You can see the dark bands of magnetite (iron oxide) in this cross section - that’s what is causing it to be magnetic.

Yes I didn't think it was a metioright . I was refence to another person that found some sandstone.

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To  be fair I can see this stone is white. But not the same kind of white, this sandstone has patches of translucent sandgrains that lost their color, they appear white but a very very clean and attractive white, this is very dissimilar fireball IMO fireball -Odin

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