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Odinxgen

Could this be a sandstone meteorite, Seriously

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5 minutes ago, Odinxgen said:

STONE-5 And he was actually an astrobiologist so I got recommended to his friend who is an expert on meteorites.

Pursue that.

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Honestly though I'm just putting all informations together. I hope that everybody that's interested views the STONE-5 results above. It's specific on what happened to the sandstone. and I would like everybody that has seen all of the information on this topic to help me figure this out. 

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1 hour ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

Pursue that.

Yeah, I am pursuing that and more Stillweaver

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Guys I just made a huge breakthrough that proves this is from mars. It is explosive.

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Posted (edited)

:Just_Cuz_06:I guess it sparks when you strike it, eh.? Was trying to  an emoji for  a miner with  dynamite ,but  failed .

Edited by Stillweaver hillbelli

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1 hour ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

:Just_Cuz_06:I guess it sparks when you strike it, eh.? Was trying to  an emoji for  a miner with  dynamite ,but  failed .

Nope I took some dust and cooked that crap like an addict. not Amazingly violent but definitely explosive. I was researching mars and found out its soil is rich in perchlorarate and that makes it difficult to test the soil because perchlorate is explosive so I figured hell, if this things from mars the sand should blow. It does and that's hard to get around because its formed by nitrate and is rare on earth. Bodafuckingbing my dudes, thx for listening to my bullcrap.

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Don't ask me why it doesn't blow up in the atmosphere I have no idea but given all of this evidence and research that I have done, I gotta say I think I found the first sandstone from mars, and how yall are able to field test that crap

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Posted (edited)

It pops explosively or burns?  Are you sure it isn't just water turning to steam?A. Video would be helpful...🌋

..plenty of Earth rocks will explode around a campfire from moisture they contain

 

 

Edited by Stillweaver hillbelli
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I don"t know what it is about Canada, but for some reason the meteorites up there either start fires or are explosive. 

13 hours ago, Odinxgen said:

Nope I took some dust and cooked that crap like an addict. not Amazingly violent but definitely explosive. I was researching mars and found out its soil is rich in perchlorarate and that makes it difficult to test the soil because perchlorate is explosive so I figured hell, if this things from mars the sand should blow. It does and that's hard to get around because its formed by nitrate and is rare on earth. Bodafuckingbing my dudes, thx for listening to my bullcrap.

Are you wearing a mask while cooking your rock? Just saying be safe while testing your rock don't want the thing to explode. Will you be alright if you find out your rock is granite, because there is a good chance that's what you have. If you do have sediment from mars great and everyone would say hooray and move on. On the other hand if it's not are you ready to keep hunting or would you give up after the heart break?

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Are you sure this isn't from the extraterrestrial object Ounuama that flew by earth in 2018 or a more recent fall?  I would think something as reactive as the perchlorates you found would have reacted if it were not a recent fall.

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Posted (edited)

 

16 hours ago, Odinxgen said:

Guys I just made a huge breakthrough that proves this is from mars. It is explosive.

Explain and provide the backing science.  Last time I checked this is not how rocks from Mars are identified.

Edited by Mikestang

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Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

 

Explain and provide the backing science.  Last time I checked this is not how rocks from Mars are identified.

It's cutting edge science Mike. This is one of those major discoveries it may take years for the established science community to digest. Just accept the fact that we are witnessing history in the making. This thread is documentation for others to base their thesis upon. It may be the birth of an entirely new branch of meteoritics and it all started here on Nugget Shooter Forum.

To heck with the established process for identification. This thing is explosive when you smoke it! I'll bet a Canadian Dollar it came from Mars. There is really no other explanation after such exhaustive research.

:)

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Boom, bang or pop. Whichever you prefer.
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We need Jimale to comment on this stone! Where is that guy when you need him? I wonder how he and his camels are doing?

I bet he has found a similar sandstone in Kenya. And this cutting edge science may open some doors to ID some of his finds.

I sure hope he gives us his opinion on this issue. I know he would want to be part of this historic event. 

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So i guess im coming into this a little late.  Little back ground on myself i went to college for geology and i am in the process of obtaining my professional geologist license.  

A few things that have stood out to me in Odin's description of the sample:

You say the rock is sandstone and has small olivine crystals in it, and that the size of the olivine indicates a possible martian origin.  

  • If it is sandstone then the olivine crystals got there through erosion from a source and hence the size of them would mean nothing since they have been eroded.  
  • Olivine on earth can come in just about any size from microscopic to large crystals. (FYI Peridot is just a gem quality crystal of olivine)

From this i would have to say that the olivine in the sample is not evidence of being from mars.  

However from what ive seen of the pieces that Odin has broken off from the sample, i dont believe that its sandstone.  It looks like metasandstone, meaning that it is sandstone that has been partially metamorphosed, to the point where it has both characteristics of a sandstone and schist or gneiss.  The clay minerals in it have been altered into mica and there is some banding.  This type of metasandstone is all over the place in the area i live and can form some interesting weathering patterns and have some interesting mineral assemblages.  

While Mars has sedimentary rocks, almost all are near the surface and only a few meters thick, this means that mars could not have produced a metasandstone, since that would require greater burial depth to cause enough heat and pressure to change sandstone to metasandstone.  No the layering could not formed from the heat of re-entry in the atmosphere.  

 

It also potentially resembles a decomposing granite that has undergone some metamorphism.  While granite type rocks have been observed on mars they are exceedingly rare there.  SO the likely hood of granite type meteorite from Mars is probably next to impossible.  

 

As for the outer shape of the sample, i dont see that it indicates any type of entry into earths atmosphere.  Rocks form all sorts of wierd shapes that look like various things, and based off of everything else ive pointed out i dont see this being from Mars.  

I could be wrong, if you really want to find out go here https://geolabs.com/pages/meteorite-identification and send them a sample and they will tell you.  Cost is $100 and then you will know one way or the other.  

 

Best of luck.  

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Update* 
I spoke with a researcher with expertise in meteorites, and specifically with several published papers on Sed-Types.  
She confirmed my analysis of the stone is consistent with previous finds thought to be Sedimentary Meteorites. She noted my cleverness in being able to identify these features and with 
her opinion I should now be taken seriously with the local University. As per her recommendation I am pursuing Electro Microscopy and if possible thermoluminescence and I wanted to share this exciting development with the people in this fine thread. Expect new updates here when my suspicions are confirmed as the thing we are looking for is fracturing caused by high energy impact which is physically apparent in the breaking pattern. Link to my youtube video for the individuals interested in following this topic. I know it's a fantastic claim and most break through discoveries are. But research all supports the evidence of this stone being in fact a Sed-type meteorite. WOW! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnMpqU3cXws&t=904s

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On 8/6/2019 at 3:28 PM, PG-Prospecting said:

So i guess im coming into this a little late.  Little back ground on myself i went to college for geology and i am in the process of obtaining my professional geologist license.  

A few things that have stood out to me in Odin's description of the sample:

You say the rock is sandstone and has small olivine crystals in it, and that the size of the olivine indicates a possible martian origin.  

  • If it is sandstone then the olivine crystals got there through erosion from a source and hence the size of them would mean nothing since they have been eroded.  
  • Olivine on earth can come in just about any size from microscopic to large crystals. (FYI Peridot is just a gem quality crystal of olivine)

From this i would have to say that the olivine in the sample is not evidence of being from mars.  

However from what ive seen of the pieces that Odin has broken off from the sample, i dont believe that its sandstone.  It looks like metasandstone, meaning that it is sandstone that has been partially metamorphosed, to the point where it has both characteristics of a sandstone and schist or gneiss.  The clay minerals in it have been altered into mica and there is some banding.  This type of metasandstone is all over the place in the area i live and can form some interesting weathering patterns and have some interesting mineral assemblages.  

While Mars has sedimentary rocks, almost all are near the surface and only a few meters thick, this means that mars could not have produced a metasandstone, since that would require greater burial depth to cause enough heat and pressure to change sandstone to metasandstone.  No the layering could not formed from the heat of re-entry in the atmosphere.  

 

It also potentially resembles a decomposing granite that has undergone some metamorphism.  While granite type rocks have been observed on mars they are exceedingly rare there.  SO the likely hood of granite type meteorite from Mars is probably next to impossible.  

 

As for the outer shape of the sample, i dont see that it indicates any type of entry into earths atmosphere.  Rocks form all sorts of wierd shapes that look like various things, and based off of everything else ive pointed out i dont see this being from Mars.  

I could be wrong, if you really want to find out go here https://geolabs.com/pages/meteorite-identification and send them a sample and they will tell you.  Cost is $100 and then you will know one way or the other.  

 

Best of luck.  

I don't want to argue false information. Everything I have stated in this forum is true, And you may hypothesize all you want, I am only more certain of my find and it will serve as condemnation of this community as I have stated this already. The rock speaks for itself, and if you are unwilling to do any research into this topic kindly keep your OPINION to yourself. Many people here have not only denied facts I have laid out but ridiculed me for due diligence and intuition that should be celebrated. This speaks to the advancements the internet has made to meteoritics as all of my study of fusion crust, regmaglyphts, flow lines ect, was a key reason I was so quick to identify this as a meteorite while professional hunters were apparently in disbelief. Just enjoy the fact that the first confirmed sed type meteorite may be on the horizon and the discussion began here.

-Odin

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On 8/2/2019 at 8:33 PM, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

So you didn't post this topic? 

SOMEONE ELSE posted the topic heading, "COULD THIS BE...?"

And you expected no opinions to be thrown your way in response?

That is highly illogical. 

Oy

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19 hours ago, Odinxgen said:

... if you are unwilling to do any research into this topic kindly keep your OPINION to yourself.

,,,,Just enjoy the fact that the first confirmed sed type meteorite may be on the horizon and the discussion began here.

-Odin

:laught16:

 

Just enjoy the fact that you are going to get a whole bunch of crap thrown your way for making statements like that. :poostorm:

You are correct that "the rock speaks for itself". And it is saying something completely different than what you are typing.

You are not convincing anyone that it is a meteorite. We do see that you are attempting to get a professional opinion and that is exactly what all of us feel that you need to do. We do not however feel that you need to tell us what type of opinions are welcome on this forum or dictate the parameters of the conversation. 

So go! Study your sandstone and get back to us with an expert evaluation! We will be waiting anxiously. Meanwhile you will just have to live with our opinions and learn to deal with the direction the discussion goes.

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19 hours ago, Odinxgen said:

... She noted my cleverness 

I note your cleverness too.

Now go and get someone with experience in the field to evaluate your stone. Take their opinion to heart even if it is not the answer you wanted. And then go out and find a real one. Or another real one. Whichever the case may be.

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On 8/6/2019 at 12:12 PM, chrisski said:

Are you sure this isn't from the extraterrestrial object Ounuama that flew by earth in 2018 or a more recent fall?  I would think something as reactive as the perchlorates you found would have reacted if it were not a recent fall.

Perchlorates would only be reactive if it reached a certain concentration. 

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I don't think the linear flow features line up with the minor orientation features. It looks like a river sediment that took a flow perpendicular to the proposed "edges" of the face of the object. The most I can say is that the pitting is too perfect a shape for slow, yet altogether more erosional flow of water across the surface

It exibits the flow too much for a stoney meteorite to have taken at such high speeds. Stoney meteorites take rounder shapes.

The pitting suggests that the current followed a path of least resistence in line with each successive molecular shift of the surface.

Edited by WillM

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