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Odinxgen

Could this be a sandstone meteorite, Seriously

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1 hour ago, billpeters said:

"How could any of us here ignore the clues that are left in this rock", Odinxgen. 

"Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mostly of quartz sand, but it can also contain significant amounts of feldspar, and sometimes silt and clay."

"Accessory minerals are all other mineral grains in a sandstone; commonly these minerals make up just a small percentage of the grains in a sandstone. Common accessory minerals include micas (muscovite and biotite), olivinepyroxene, and corundum.[4][5] Many of these accessory grains are more dense than the silicates that make up the bulk of the rock. These heavy minerals are commonly resistant to weathering and can be used as an indicator of sandstone maturity through the ZTR index.[6] Common heavy minerals include zircontourmalinerutile (hence ZTR), garnetmagnetite, or other dense, resistant minerals derived from the source rock."

The white crust is limestone or a calcium product.

Cheers.

billpeters

Yes but what is your claim here because the only crystal structures included are quite small, which indicates rapid cooling and Olivine is what we are talking here, found in Martian meteorites as well and abundant ish on mars a lot of it is quartz sand with an unknown black flake substance which is probably pyroxene, also found in Martian meteorites,, aaand the yellowish crystals are also probably olivine. So this and the unusual shape that has limited ability to have happened? I'm just not understanding what you are refuting, or the point you are making when this has been acknowledged and actually doesn't disprove anything?

 

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And a white crust is exactly what has been said to be an indicator so saying that it has a white crust will get us nowhere, I do wonder what your honest opinion is about the imprints because If you look at all the sides carfully you will see what I mean by it not being possible to have been held up on such a small face the explenations for how these may have formed are so far off from what I am seeing and you can clearly see that in the video.

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Billpeters, 

I am just being honest, I'm not attacking your experience or skill as you clearly are better suited to id this than I am. 

That being said none of us here can say that we know what one would look like iim just saying that there is a lot of indicators that this is real. And given everything I have presented I hope to see at least some entertainment of the idea that I could be right about what we are looking at. Because at the end of the day there is no magic wand that will make this a meteorite if it's not. Maybe its just a regular old sandstone but I don't think its a coincidence that the video I posted before my own is the only comparable stone I have seen in some regards. But I believe that this one is far superior as it has MANY identifying features such as melt accumulation in the deep imprints, possible orientation, Super fine crystal olivine. And the Imprints which to me clearly resemble regmaglypht patterns although less so than iron and more so than stone.

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Posted (edited)

The shape of your sandstone boulder with it's pits is the common shape and pits one sees from terrestrial, weather worn sandstone rocks. The shape or your rock has no similarity to Martian rocks, nor any similarity to the regmaglypts of other meteorites. 

Those pits look naturally occurring due to water, heat, frost weathering. They are dissimilar to man-made nutting stones.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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59 minutes ago, billpeters said:

The shape of your sandstone boulder with it's pits is the common shape and pits one sees from terrestrial, weather worn sandstone rocks. The shape or your rock has no similarity to Martian rocks, nor any similarity to the regolyiths of other meteorites. 

Those pits look naturally occurring due to water, heat, frost weathering. They are dissimilar to man-made nutting stones.

billpeters

This still disproves nothing and I strongly insist that you are mischaracterizing the shape and formation of regmaglyphts. For some reason it seems the idea of a sandstone hard enough to survive atmospheric entry see STONE 5-6 (Artificial martian sandstone) Having a slightly irregular pattern than the ones you probably look at all day is unusual to you and I would refer you to the research available rather than baselessly insert your perspective yes there are several things that cause pocks in sandstone, and not a single one of those events is comparable based on the ton of research ive done. is it possible that this sat face up on a very small surface while enduring the conditions necessary to produce this in fact the same can be said about atmospheric entry which by the way would explain the gneiss appearance that Mordock pointed out.

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These are regmaglypts, now say you smoothed the sandstone so it was no longer rough, REGMAGLYPHTS. Which i'm sure logically makes sense. And thankfully this one is abundant and nice enough to give an orientation terrestrial or not. Regmaglyphts would probably be the strongest indicator in a true sandstone or sedimentary meteorite

327-978-thickbox.jpg

Stony meteorite.jpg

thN0AER3S8.jpg

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Posted (edited)

The shape of your sandstone boulder with it's pits is the common shape and pits one sees from terrestrial, weather worn rocks. The shape or your rock has no similarity to Martian rocks, nor any similarity the regmaglypts of other meteorites. 

Those pits look naturally occurring due to water, heat, frost weathering. They are dissimilar to 

billpeters

Edited by billpeters

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Posted (edited)

Correct. The regmaglypts on the outside pics you have provided have no similarity to your boulder.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters

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1 hour ago, billpeters said:

The shape of your sandstone boulder with it's pits is the common shape and pits one sees from terrestrial, weather worn rocks. The shape or your rock has no similarity to Martian rocks, nor any similarity the regolyiths of other meteorites. 

Those pits look naturally occurring due to water, heat, frost weathering. They are dissimilar to 

billpeters

Okay heres what I got now if you would be so kind as to also back up what you just said. That this is the most common shape of weather worn sediment, with some proof because I don't appreciate being patronized and treated like a child when I am just searching for truth.

20190730_022611.jpg

20190730_022800.jpg

20190802_101602.jpg

20190802_101607.jpg

20190802_101723.jpg

20190802_101817.jpg

20190802_101827.jpg

20190802_101851.jpg

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Also there are a lot of factors to be considered right now so singling out our very different views on the shaping of the rock is not going to go anywhere. there are a lot of other reasons and it is unscientific to try and disseminate them as if they weren't connected. Listen I know that nobody wants to be wrong because you probably feel pretty sure that I am wrong. But if you can prove that this is a regular sandstone i'm more than happy with all of the great information already contained here and I will accept the facts but only if you are going to present it with evidence as I have built a pretty solid cases here that like it or not cannot just be pushed aside. There are to many coincidences with to many people willing to just ignore them and single out what is not traditionally meteoric.

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It would be so true if a sediment meteorite hit us on the head we would still call it terrestrial so all of the confidence you are assuming here is in my eyes arrogance and clearly these details need to be worked out so that when one does come along it doesn't get thrown in the F*** garbage as has probably happened unfortunately

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2 hours ago, adam said:

!  Not from Mars though, from much further and beyond ......

Niburu,I knew it!😋

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6 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

Niburu,I knew it!😋

Nope. Alpha Centari.

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1 hour ago, billpeters said:

Correct. The regmaglyts on the outside pics you have provided have no similarity to your boulder.

billpeters

yeah neither does the differentially weathered pock:idunno:

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1 hour ago, Morlock said:

Nope. Alpha Centari.

Exactly, Meteorites from a planet that doesn't exist as oppose to the neighboring planet which suffered a cataclysmic event

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Some people just won't believe their rock isn't a meteorite.

BTW, are  you a gemologist?  Curious how you made the positive ID for olivine, which like feldspar, is super common here on Earth, and neither are a definitive meteorite ID.

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1 hour ago, chrisski said:
1 hour ago, chrisski said:

The content of these posts makes me think someone has taken a second name registering twice on this board, being braver with the second name.

 

1 hour ago, Odinxgen said:

Not me I am legit =)! check me out!

 

Chrisski,

I know exactly who you're thinking of....BUT I being an Administrator can see members IP addresses and thus where they are posting from,  I can also see when they post from different devices and I can assure you that this is not who you think it could be, the person you're thinking of and Odinxgen are posting from several thousands of miles apart from each other and on different devices, Odinxgen is posting from exactly where he has stated he is posting from.

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I'm still waiting for images of the common terrestrial sandstone similar to this one, everyone here feels pretty sure they are right enough so to ignore all the evidence I have pointed to and only suggest that for a second the meteorite buffs here step out of the very easy identifications to look at something new. AAnnd Not a single person here has put forward a shred of evidence that can discredit what has been observed and is completely and wholly available here. I don't have the heart or the thick skin to not feel hurt at all of this ridicule so I am going to leave this where it is and I wish you all the best!

 

Happy hunting,

Odinxgen 

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8 minutes ago, Odinxgen said:

...everyone here feels pretty sure they are right enough so to ignore all the evidence I have pointed to...

Yeah. I am comfortable with it. :inocent:

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Posted (edited)

Regmaglypts occur almost exclusively on Iron-nickel, mostly metal meteorites and not on Martian nor normally stony meteorites. 

It would make no sense for someone to make nutting pits on the bottom surface of a large boulder, nor would it make much sense to make them non-circular. Those marks are naturally occurring, not man-made.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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59 minutes ago, billpeters said:

Regmaglypts occur almost exclusively on Iron-nickel meteorites and not on Martian nor normally stony meteorites. 

billpeters

Ecatly not normally, but a sandstone meteorite would have them wouldn't it?  But again everybody here is so smug that they know meteorites so well that there is NO way they would miss this. I have presented the facts as I have observed them and Some people cant look past that a meterorite made of sandstone is not going to look like others and discuss this particular sandstone. Now I know what I am looking at and nobody here has been able to produce the quote "very common weathered sandstone" that features pock from weathering that even closely resemble this. nobody said crap about the what I think is melted quartz in the deeper imprint, or about the size of the olivine crystals that are visible in the pictures posted here. Honestly I don't know what to say other than you guys are making a big mistake and I wish it would be taken seriously for a second.

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10 minutes ago, billpeters said:

Regmaglypts occur almost exclusively on Iron-nickel, mostly metal meteorites and not on Martian nor normally stony meteorites. 

billpeters

Sandstone meteorites from the fifth dimension always have regmaglypts don't they?

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