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Meteorite in ancient reef rock??

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I’m completely ignorant when it comes to meteorites, rocks and gems, my hobby is actually saltwater fish tanks and collecting corals. For new aquariums we sometimes use dry harvested from land ancient reef rock made up of calcium carbonate limestone.  This rock comes from ancient reef when the Florida landmass was formed, you can sometimes see fragments of shells in these rocks.

I happened to get a piece which has a dark colored rock or metal embedded in it. I realized it was in there about a week after putting it inside my newly filled aquarium and I got nervous because most heavy metals in the water will kill corals.  I called the place I bought the calcium carbonate limestone rocks from and also another reputable vendor who have both gone through tons and tons of these rocks but never seen anything like this before. 

Typically the rocks are just whiteish porous limestone.  I posted a pic in one of the fish forums I’m part of and someone said maybe it’s a meteorite that hit the ancient reef, which never crossed my mind. My mind tends to go to bad things, like uranium, which I see in google can be in limestone sometimes. Again, I’m completely ignorant and have no idea what this could be. 

Anybody have any idea what this is or how to find out? The surface area is maybe the size of a dime. One picture shows the entire limestone rock in my aquarium, with the small piece I’m questioning towards the top. The other pics that are actually clear were taken in the sunlight when I pulled the rock out and it’s still wet. 

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Hi Reef, have you tried to see if a magnet is attracted to the suspect meteorite? Try and tie a magnet on a string and dangle it close to your rock and see if the magnet sticks. Or if you can't put one on a string just see if you can get a magnet to stick to your black rock.

ht

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There are occurrences of fossil meteorites...that would be a very rare and totally cool find, Dude!

I am sure there is a better term than "fossil" but this was easy....

fred

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Thanks for the replies. I haven’t tried a magnet yet. Here’s a clearer pic of the rock when it’s dry in sunlight. I didn’t notice the spider until I was looking at the pictures. If it’s something radioactive I could have ended up as Spider-Man!

0BFA83E3-8735-4B7E-81D5-C34C925BC986.jpeg

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Reef,

I will hazard a guess that they are not magnetic nor meteoritic in origin. There are far too many impurities in the ocean which outnumber meteorites millions to one, including stone debris and other ancient flora and fauna.  You realize that most coral grows on dark rock. 

Hope I am wrong.

Cheers.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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Reef,

Being a fellow reef keeper, I can tell you with near certainty, that's tufa rock.

Tufa is formed by chemical deposition under the seabed, not from stony coral growth above it. All manner of rock and debris can be inside it.

Aaaannnnd(sorry BillP).... Most corals grow on coralline algae encrusted coral skeletons....aka reef.

The coralline algae is typically very dark purple, but can be any color of the rainbow. Its a calcareous algae, what actually builds and cements reefs together.

When it dies it leaves a pure white to bone grey skeleton behind, much the same as stony(reef building) corals.

Respectfully, DaveZ

 

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4 hours ago, DaveZ said:

Reef,

Being a fellow reef keeper, I can tell you with near certainty, that's tufa rock.

Tufa is formed by chemical deposition under the seabed, not from stony coral growth above it. All manner of rock and debris can be inside it.

Aaaannnnd(sorry BillP).... Most corals grow on coralline algae encrusted coral skeletons....aka reef.

The coralline algae is typically very dark purple, but can be any color of the rainbow. Its a calcareous algae, what actually builds and cements reefs together.

When it dies it leaves a pure white to bone grey skeleton behind, much the same as stony(reef building) corals.

Respectfully, DaveZ

 

Hi DaveZ, the rock in question is the gray colored nodule inside of the limestone, carbonate or tufa as you mentioned.  But like you said, anything could possible be inside it.  It’s nice to hear from a fellow reef keeper, thanks for the reply. 

Edited by Reef
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