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I found this on a beach here in Newfoundland Canada. A magnet doesn't stick to it. I first thought it was part of a wrought iron knob or fence post maybe and that the light grey was soldering.

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It looks like an artifact. A stone used for grinding. It sure could be a naturally shaped beach stone but it looks like it has been abraded on one side.

Natives used stones like these to crush seeds, make paint and use as a percussion tool. 

Lots of stones have great symmetry. Some have been shaped by human hands and some are naturally shaped. It is tough to tell sometimes. It sure looks like yours has a ground flat spot on the grey colored face. That is what I base my answer on.

 

 

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Thanks. That is quite interesting as it was found where the Beothuck once lived before the Brits killed them all off.

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1 minute ago, Cheshirecat said:

Thanks. That is quite interesting as it was found where the Beothuck once lived before the Brits killed them all off.

Yeah. Here we call them "manos" which is a Spanish word that means "hand". Because it was held in the hand. They are pretty common anywhere there was any ancient culture activity. Everyone had to grind stuff up and that is what they used.

No telling what crazy Newfie word you folks up there call them! :) I thought a Texan had a strange vernacular until I met a Newfoundlander! 

Just kidding CCat. You found yourself a Beothuck grinding stone!

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HI Bob, I had a few responses on FB and a geologist I know said this:  Are you sure the shiny silver you see when scratching it is not the metal of the knife rubbing off on it? There is a type of feature called a concretion which forms in shale. They usually look like a miniature flying saucer and can be up to a meter in diameter. When you crack them open you may see fools gold (pyrite). When the shale eroded the concretions are released.

Me: I saw some pics and I have to disagree. And I refuse to break it open to see. Ha!

SOmeone else said this: Stones like this can sometimes form when they fall into a hollow in the bedrock with water flowing over it. The stone is tumbled by the flowing water and eventually becomes rounded, sometimes to a perfect sphere.

Me: Again I disagree. It really does feel like something that was used. Hence me thinking it may have been an old knob. It is kind of concave where that grey flat area is and worn smooth. I prefer the artifact idea LOL.

Not sure what crazy word someone would use here except, "das an old rock ba". And never use the term Newfie here or you may get your head chewed off. I'm fine with it. :)Yes the accents here and terms are quite something. We have our own Newfoundland dictionary. Cheers

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Welcome to the forum Cheshirecat!

What term is OK to call a Newfoundlander?

Where I live in the SE USA it's OK to call us anything you like as long as you don't call us late for supper, that would get you in hot water for sure, we love our food!! :brows:

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It is not a hematite concretion. I am a bit of an expert on those. They do resemble little flying saucers and can be quite large. Mars is covered in them. The ones with the "equators" or flattened poles are considered "male" stones and those that are more spherical without an "equator" are considered females. They are pretty common in sandstone throughout the U.S. and are downright everywhere in places. That is not one.

What you have is probably more of a nodule than a concretion. It looks like a silica and iron rich volcanic of some sort. It probably started out pretty spherical and the waves made it even more so. 

Don't break it. There will be nothing of interest inside.

It definitely looks like it was rubbed against another rock on that one side. Regardless of what type of rock it started out to be, it wound up an artifact. You should be able to feel the different texture on that side. Stones worked by abrasion have a skin soft feel to them even if a lot of pits and flaws remain. That one flattened side should have a distinctly smoother feel to it. You can see the abraded surface in the second photo pretty good.

Any human would pick that stone up. It is just the right size and shape for a tool. I will bet a person a thousand years ago picked it up for the same reasons you did. 

...

I think you Canadians are  big hoot. Especially from your neck of the woods. I have had the pleasure of meeting a couple rough and tumble characters from Newfoundland working in the oil field. I was mighty impressed and I am pretty hard to impress. So you are allright by me. 

New Mexicans have a lot in common with Newfoundlanders. We occupy the hinterlands where most never venture, speak our own strange language and tend to be a bit fierce and independent too. Just as a Newfoundlander is a special species of Canookian so are New Mexicans a unique breed of Mafrican American. :)

Here we would say, "Orale Chingona! I'm all loving your rock bro! It looks like a manito. Aye Buey!" 

 

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13 hours ago, Au Seeker said:

Welcome to the forum Cheshirecat!

What term is OK to call a Newfoundlander?

Where I live in the SE USA it's OK to call us anything you like as long as you don't call us late for supper, that would get you in hot water for sure, we love our food!! :brows:

Thank You! Newfoundlander is just fine and Newfie is fine by me if a term of endearment. I have heard it used the way the N word is used and people here get pissed about that. We love our food too. :)

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11 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

It is not a hematite concretion. I am a bit of an expert on those. They do resemble little flying saucers and can be quite large. Mars is covered in them. The ones with the "equators" or flattened poles are considered "male" stones and those that are more spherical without an "equator" are considered females. They are pretty common in sandstone throughout the U.S. and are downright everywhere in places. That is not one.

What you have is probably more of a nodule than a concretion. It looks like a silica and iron rich volcanic of some sort. It probably started out pretty spherical and the waves made it even more so. 

Don't break it. There will be nothing of interest inside.

It definitely looks like it was rubbed against another rock on that one side. Regardless of what type of rock it started out to be, it wound up an artifact. You should be able to feel the different texture on that side. Stones worked by abrasion have a skin soft feel to them even if a lot of pits and flaws remain. That one flattened side should have a distinctly smoother feel to it. You can see the abraded surface in the second photo pretty good.

Any human would pick that stone up. It is just the right size and shape for a tool. I will bet a person a thousand years ago picked it up for the same reasons you did. 

...

I think you Canadians are  big hoot. Especially from your neck of the woods. I have had the pleasure of meeting a couple rough and tumble characters from Newfoundland working in the oil field. I was mighty impressed and I am pretty hard to impress. So you are allright by me. 

New Mexicans have a lot in common with Newfoundlanders. We occupy the hinterlands where most never venture, speak our own strange language and tend to be a bit fierce and independent too. Just as a Newfoundlander is a special species of Canookian so are New Mexicans a unique breed of Mafrican American. :)

Here we would say, "Orale Chingona! I'm all loving your rock bro! It looks like a manito. Aye Buey!" 

 

Bob, You're a card! Yes "Newfies" can be a hoot for sure. Many of us go off to work in oil patches.  Fort Mac especially.  Love that last sentence. Now I have to google it.

I didn't think it was concretion from the photos my friend showed me. But I am a total amateur. I have a fascination with geology and archeology but never went that road. My son did. I have shelves of rocks I have collected. It's a sickness really. Haha. I watch videos of different rocks and my latest fave is the puddingstone of the East coast US with the gorgeous reds.

This stone does have that skin smooth feel on the shiny side.

So I looked up  volcanic nodule and discovered septarian fossil nodule. Thanks a lot. Now I'll be half the day looking at these things!! :P  haha

I have another find that looks like it may have been a tool but there are no marks made from shaping it the way arrow heads often look. Probably a fluke. Maybe I'll post that too.

 

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