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Terrible picture but is it possible to have opals up here in the up? That little green Blue speck. Real different in depth in person, multiple blues and greens

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578EDD13-26A4-4BEE-874C-B1751FC237AC.jpeg

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Could just be a light refraction, I get them in quartz and selenite I find.

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I agree that the color you are seeing is light refractions from tiny cracks in the stone. 

It looks like quartz and not opal. They are made of (virtually) the same stuff but quartz is crystalline and opal is amorphous. You can see the granular structure in your stone... like crystallized sugar. Opal is not crystalline at all. It is just like poured glass. And the vast majority of opal has no color or flash at all. That is "precious opal" and not "common opal" which is quite common in volcanic geology.

Learn the subtle differences between "microcrystalline" and "cryptocrystalline" stones and you can spot the difference between quartz and other minerals (opal, agate, jasper, etc.) pretty quickly.

Up where you are the minerals associated with recent volcanism are going to be scarce. If you find any they are going to have been transported a long distance and be the most durable stones to have survived the journey. I would opine that opals and such would not be on the menu at all. They are soft, crumble easily and do not survive transportation well. Agate and jasper nodules on the other hand are tough and nearly indestructible. They can travel thousands of miles unaltered. So can quartz.

See how that specimen is cloudy kinda like a sugar cube? How it breaks in little chunks rather than in little conchoidal flakes? That is the subtle difference between fracture and cleavage and one of the main determining factors between crystalline (quartz) and amorphous (opal) silica minerals.

The larger the silica crystals the more pressure the specimen as formed under. Some quartz has large crystals and was formed under great pressure. Silica like agates, jaspers and opals were formed under low pressure (near or at the surface) and have very tiny crystals. Hit a few specimens with a hammer and you will quickly see the difference between the quartz which will crumble along cleavage lines between the crystals and agate (jasper, chert, opal, etc.) which will break conchoidally as the stress wave flows through the amorphous (non crystallized) material.

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Posted (edited)

Can I ask where you found it? 

Growing up in New England where the glaciers delivered all or nearly all the stones we had there, that type of quartz was really common.  So common, I thought it was found throughout the whole world.  The more I traveled and grew an interest in amateur geology, I realized it was not as common as I thought.  Where I live now in the desert Southwest, quartz is common, but when I find it, the quartz is very jagged because it often breaks and rots in place versus being carried by the streams and glaciers elsewhere.  There's other places I've been where I find quartz only in stream beds, and some other deserts in other parts of the world that were recently a shallow ocean, I did not see it at all.

When I prospect, I keep my eyes open for large pieces of quarts that are not fractured, but I have not found those.  A large find of that could have a some value for things like tabletops or an art project I'm thinking of.  Haven't found that.  I found a huge 20' tall by 100' wide wall of quarts that went back at least 50', but it was extremely cracked, and had mica.  The place had been worked in the past, but I think that had been worked in the past as a mica mine, which today has no value, or at least none I could use.  My point is, I think some large unfractured quartz could have some value.

Edited by chrisski

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friends don and madge in the sixties had a hard rock gold mine in pine valley CA. they made more money from selling the quartz to a bakery than they did the gold.

growing up on fram home baked bread was much lighter than modern bread. 

 

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3 hours ago, wet/dry washer said:

friends don and madge in the sixties had a hard rock gold mine in pine valley CA. they made more money from selling the quartz to a bakery than they did the gold.

growing up on fram home baked bread was much lighter than modern bread. 

 

What in the world would a bakery need quartz for? 

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to add weigh for more money. look at the ingredients on a loft of bread, stone ground means ground quartz.

only buy organic almond and coconut flour, expensive but so much better for your health.

 

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1 hour ago, wet/dry washer said:

to add weigh for more money. look at the ingredients on a loft of bread, stone ground means ground quartz.

only buy organic almond and coconut flour, expensive but so much better for your health.

 

Stone ground does not mean they added crushed quartz, and even if it did, that’s a step for the flour mill, not the bakery.

you really have no idea what you’re talking about, do you?

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1 hour ago, wet/dry washer said:

to add weigh for more money. look at the ingredients on a loft of bread, stone ground means ground quartz.

only buy organic almond and coconut flour, expensive but so much better for your health.

 

What?? Ok here is the REAL reason for bakers buying quartz slabs and countertops. My grandmother and my wife's grandmother both used quartz slabs for bread making. Rolling the dough and stuff like that. 

"You can roll pastry dough easily on the naturally cold quartz surface". 

Never have i heard of using quartz as a filler or for adding weight to bread.

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Time to make a quartz deposit............

 

 

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I could be off here, god knows that some of us are, but I think he means when they stone grind the wheat the stones rubbing together wear and add some dust to the flour, but maybe not, who knows.

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He may be referring to "silicon dioxide" which is found in some food and supplement products.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Au Seeker said:

I could be off here, god knows that some of us are, but I think he means when they stone grind the wheat the stones rubbing together wear and add some dust to the flour, but maybe not, who knows.

Don and Madge sold a whole lot of quartz from their hardrock gold mine back in the 60's to a bakery. It made the bread heavier and worth more. Because we all know how valuable heavy bread is. Because bread back on the farm was much lighter and worth less. It had no quartz in it. Back in the old days bread was not "stone ground" like it is today.

 

51 minutes ago, frank c said:

He may be referring to "silicon dioxide" which is found in some food and supplement products.

Don and Madge sold so much silicon dioxide from their hardrock gold mine to bakeries that the profits from quartz were more than that of gold. You will notice that all food supplements that contain silicon dioxide are advertised as "stone ground". That means it contains quartz to make it heavier and thereby more valuable. Heavy food and diet pills are worth much more than light bread and diet pills. This makes barren quartz a valuable commodity worth mining. That is why so many famous mines have names like "The Pumpernickel" and "The Marble Rye".

 

……..

Why cant we all just pretend that this is factual information like we do with our elected officials?  Just go along with it. Don't rock the boat. Be polite and swallow the "stone ground" BS and smile. Wave a flag or something. :inocent:

Remember, kids use this forum for learning about stuff. So meteorites cause fires, maritime laws don't apply to natives on natïve soil and bread has ground quartz in it. Wear a wool coat in the summer to keep cool and have your letters in red ink signed by the postmaster. Drink some vinegar shots and smear coconut oil on your temples. Because this is the wisdom of the ages that experienced men have to offer the children. 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Make the postmaster great again.
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On 5/14/2019 at 3:13 AM, Morlock said:

What in the world would a bakery need quartz for? 

I wish I never would have asked...

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25 minutes ago, Morlock said:

I wish I never would have asked...

It pays to think twice before you dig too deep with this one. Lest you find yourself trying to put the peanut butter back into the toothpaste tube. :idunno:

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Posted (edited)

In case someone is interested in the real use of silicon dioxide in foods.

From Wikipedia...

Food and pharmaceutical applications[edit]

Silica is a common additive in food production, where it is used primarily as a flow agent in powdered foods, or to adsorb water in hygroscopic applications. It is used as an anti-caking agent in powdered foods such as spices and non-dairy coffee creamer. It is the primary component of diatomaceous earth. Colloidal silica is also used as a wine, beer, and juice fining agent.[19] It has the E number reference E551.

In pharmaceutical products, silica aids powder flow when tablets are formed.[citation needed]

 

 

Also, just in case you would like to know....

 

Crystalline silica (quartz) is toxic and causes silicosis on the lungs. It is rarely used in finely powdered form. Food grade silica comes from huge sedimentary deposits of diatomaceous earth which is formed from amorphous silica (opal) and not crystalline silica (quartz). Diatomaceous earth has a very low percentage of crystalline silica and can be handled safely where ground quartz is extremely hazardous to handle.

Please go up to my first post in this thread and read my explanation to Rylan about microcrystalline silica and cryptocrystalline silica and how to tell quartz from agate, opal, etc. This ties into this new discussion perfectly. It is exactly why crushed quartz is an inhalation hazard and diatomite is much less toxic. It is the difference between slow cooling under pressure (quartz) and rapid cooling at the surface (opal, glass, obsidian). It is how you tell if a rock was formed deep or at the surface.

This discussion is supposed to be about basic mineral ID. We got there via a twisted path but we must come back to reality somehow. At some point we must try to exorcise the ignorance that clouds these discussions and make something positive out of it. Hopefully with this basic information a reader can actually learn something about mining, rocks and minerals rather than be misled. 

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Just trying to keep it real in a universe full of BS filling gaps where knowledge is supposed to be.
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Hey Bob, not to keep this conversation going in longer, but thank you for the information, never knew that crystalline silica is toxic to the lungs, and not trying to support or deny either side of this argument, but is the crystalline silica also toxic to the digestive tract? 

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17 minutes ago, Diggingd said:

Hey Bob, not to keep this conversation going in longer, but thank you for the information, never knew that crystalline silica is toxic to the lungs, and not trying to support or deny either side of this argument, but is the crystalline silica also toxic to the digestive tract? 

If it was, we'd all be dead.

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Silica is extremely deadly when taken into the lungs in heavy quantities. Causes silicosis which closes/plugs off the air sacks in your lungs. Obviously its not an over night thing but long term. In the mining world, we have to be fit tested properly and wear a respirator anytime we are around the crusher/mill areas that produce even the smallest quantities of dust. As far as the digestive tract, i wouldn't see it being super bad. Now maybe if it were a heavy metal it might be an issue. Silica is very sharp, so maybe a bunch of it might actually collect in you and cause damage but im not sure.

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Bob mentioned diatomaceous earth (DE). I’d like to point out that there are two types. There is the type Bob was talking about, which can be used to kill insects, is often used as a feed additive for livestock, and is totally safe for just about anything you can think of. 

Then there is the type used for pool filters. DE for pool filters has undergone heating to very high temperatures which changes its structure. This type of DE is an inhalation hazard and does cause silicosis.

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The food grade DE is sold for human consumption and used to rebuild joint cartilage and connective tissue, among other things. Deadly on fleas and parasites when used as a dusting agent for pets and their bedding.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjbnJGXiJ_iAhUMi6wKHai2CAUQFjAAegQIABAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fdraxe.com%2Fdiatomaceous-earth%2F&usg=AOvVaw0qK2qdgbXy-tBcsHe50tXD

 

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4 hours ago, d_day said:

Bob mentioned diatomaceous earth (DE). I’d like to point out that there are two types. There is the type Bob was talking about, which can be used to kill insects, is often used as a feed additive for livestock, and is totally safe for just about anything you can think of. 

Then there is the type used for pool filters. DE for pool filters has undergone heating to very high temperatures which changes its structure. This type of DE is an inhalation hazard and does cause silicosis.

I use fumed silica to thicken epoxy resin. I think that is exactly how it is made. They heat up DE and re-crystallize it in a flue. It is like snowflakes.

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1 hour ago, BMc said:

The food grade DE is sold for human consumption and used to rebuild joint cartilage and connective tissue, among other things. Deadly on fleas and parasites when used as a dusting agent for pets and their bedding.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjbnJGXiJ_iAhUMi6wKHai2CAUQFjAAegQIABAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fdraxe.com%2Fdiatomaceous-earth%2F&usg=AOvVaw0qK2qdgbXy-tBcsHe50tXD

 

You can mix diatomaceous earth and ground tobacco dust at a 1:1 ratio and it makes the best insect dust you have ever seen. When it is dry the DE is lethal to most insects but when damp it does nothing. That is when the tobacco starts destroying bugs. Neither will harm plants at all. Wicked good organic insect control.

It is especially good for fungus gnats in the house that come from the potted plants. A good sprinkling of the mixture on the surface of the soil keeps them in check.

They use it when making and storing acetylene. It allows the gas to be pressurized without ignition. And it is used in much the same way in dynamite to stabilize the nitroglycerine. 

Awesome stuff that diatomaceous earth!

 

….But will it make a more valuable muffin?

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