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Guess a type from a macro photo.


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Hi!

I am slowly building my micro meteorite collection and have finally manage to find some time to make a few decent macro shots. Anyone interested in trying to guess the meteorite type? The width of most photos is around half and inch or a bit less.image-01.jpeg2019-04-17-15.39.22 ZS PMax-01.jpeg2019-04-17-15.48.42 ZS PMax-01.jpegimage-03.jpegIMG_4572-01.jpegIMG_4600-01.jpegIMG_4607-01.jpeg

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But which iron meteorite and what chondrite types? :)

For photos, I've used a reversed 50mm f/2.8 (stopped to ~f/5.6) and a decent bit of extension tubes. This gives me a much flatter field than my usual macro setup with two stacked 50mm lens. At this kinds of magnification the depth of field is minuscule so what you do is take a few photos (or sometimes a few dozen photos) with a slightly different focus point (we are talking about sub 100 micron increments). Later you use a specialized software to merge (or focus-stack as it's called) these multiple photos into a single photo where all of the subject is in focus. These I took handheld but when I have more time I use a custom-built 'robotic' rail capable of automatically taking hundreds of photos with as little as 10 micron jumps between photos.  You then get photos like this one, that look almost like they have been taken with SEM:2011-01-17-16.59 .jpg

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I'll change that guess to L5 then?  Or maybe you hinted not an L at all, in which case I'll guess R chondrite.

Was #3 a lunar or aubrite?  If I have to pick, I'll pick aubrite just because.

 

Great photos, and a fun post!

Edited by Mikestang
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4 hours ago, dsvilko said:

But which iron meteorite and what chondrite types? :)

For photos, I've used a reversed 50mm f/2.8 (stopped to ~f/5.6) and a decent bit of extension tubes. This gives me a much flatter field than my usual macro setup with two stacked 50mm lens. At this kinds of magnification the depth of field is minuscule so what you do is take a few photos (or sometimes a few dozen photos) with a slightly different focus point (we are talking about sub 100 micron increments). Later you use a specialized software to merge (or focus-stack as it's called) these multiple photos into a single photo where all of the subject is in focus. These I took handheld but when I have more time I use a custom-built 'robotic' rail capable of automatically taking hundreds of photos with as little as 10 micron jumps between photos.  You then get photos like this one, that look almost like they have been taken with SEM:2011-01-17-16.59 .jpg

Oh why did you say so in the first place, that would of been a little harder. Thanks for the photo tips and leave it to our forum expert mstang to nail it!

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Actually, it's a CO3. :)They have a much smaller chondrules than any of the ordinary chondrites. Only CH class has smaller.

The other one is lunar, a tiny but beautiful nwa 5000 fragment. Here is the back side:

2019-04-17-15.44.52 ZS PMax-01.jpeg

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

eucrite or lunar..

 

Edited by DolanDave
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On ‎4‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 10:31 PM, dsvilko said:

This should be an easy one :)

2019-04-26-18.10.06 ZS retouched-01.jpeg

 

That is obviously a terrestrilized macrophyte. I learned about these while studying the relationship between testosterone toxicity and cheap vodka on Nuggetshooter.

:)

 

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Not a diogenite. Here is the other side if it helps. I am not an expert but this small (70mg) fragment is very typical, comparing it with other photos of this kind of meteorite.

 

IMG_4750-01.jpeg

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Well done! From what I have seen, it's a typical shergottite though this is a significantly higher magnification than most of the other visible light photos.

It's from a NWA 6963, actually pictured on wikipedia as a shergottite example. Maybe I could add my photo :)

Here is another possibly simple one to guess. It's a tiny, 25mg fragment.

2019-05-01-12.50.21 ZS retouched-01.jpeg

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18 minutes ago, dsvilko said:

Yeah, but which one?

If I get anymore specific I will truly show my ignorance of meteorites. If I was forced to guess it would be Tagish Lake or Allende but I doubt either one is correct since you have posted a lot of NWA meteorites. Maybe a NWA 8534 since there is no size reference and could be a very small piece...so that is my final answer.

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It is Tagish Lake! It has that characteristic coal look - porous with a few chondrules. Per gram it is currently my most expensive meteorite ($1500/g). I am afraid to take it out of the plastic box it came in. That is why the photo is so low quality - took it through two layers of plastic.

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