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Popac

Martian meteorite?

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Posted (edited)

Years back, a friend of mine found a hole in his backyard with a rock at the bottom,  he thought it must have been a meterotite and he split it open (don't realy know why) and gave it to his friends. Recently he gave me the biggest piece. It does not attract any magnet, so no reaction from that, but if his story is true it must be a meteorite. Any opinion from the more experienced fellas?

 https://ibb.co/ngjZWV9

https://ibb.co/xLPWVPZ

https://ibb.co/GcTyQfm

https://ibb.co/1qmPXSL

Edited by Popac
Better explanation

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some mars meteorites  have none to slightly magnetic.

have vesicles caused by molten material.

no fusion crust.

appears to me you have a Martian.

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Yes no fusion crust because he cut it open maybe, it does have sort of crust on one side only, i will post pictures.

Is a find of this sort rare? It is 310gram heavy

20190323_233819.jpg

20190323_233756.jpg

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very rare. sent you a PM

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I don't think it's a meteorite. Sorry.

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3 minutes ago, Morlock said:

I don't think it's a meteorite. Sorry.

Explain please. Thank you for response

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The crust looks too shiney to be a meteorite. The shape is too angular and color on the inside is wrong. I'm not an expert on meteorites but from what I know, it's not.

 

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I see no meteoritic characteristics at all. 

Magnetism, fusion crust, free metallic iron, regmaglypts, high specific gravity, chondrules, stuff like that is indicative of a meteorite. I don't see any of those things. 

What makes you think it is a meteorite? What makes you think it is specifically a Martian meteorite?

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54 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

I see no meteoritic characteristics at all. 

Magnetism, fusion crust, free metallic iron, regmaglypts, high specific gravity, chondrules, stuff like that is indicative of a meteorite. I don't see any of those things. 

What makes you think it is a meteorite? What makes you think it is specifically a Martian meteorite?

As to why i think it is a meteorite it is because a friend of mine found it in a middle of a hole in his backyard that suddenly appeared. As to Martian because as far as i read Martian meteorites are not attracted to magnets, i have only small fridge magnets for testing but they do not attract.

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34 minutes ago, Popac said:

As to why i think it is a meteorite it is because a friend of mine found it in a middle of a hole in his backyard that suddenly appeared. As to Martian because as far as i read Martian meteorites are not attracted to magnets, i have only small fridge magnets for testing but they do not attract.

Being in a hole that suddenly appeared is not a characteristic of a meteorite. And being in a hole that suddenly appeared and not being attracted to a magnet is not indicative of a Martian meteorite.

I am sorry but IMHO your rock is not a meteorite. It is a valuable rock though because it spurred your interest and imagination and hopefully you will learn from the investigation.

Spend a little time researching the characteristics of a meteorite. This forum's archives is a great resource but the best primer on meteorites is "Rocks From Space" by O. Richard Norton. It is interesting reading and you will learn everything that (most) people need to know about the subject.

Good luck my friend! 

 

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Posted (edited)

Popac,

Most people who find an unusual rock they think is a meteorite typically think it is from Mars or the Moon and worth tens of millions of dollars. There is always a fall story, usually embellished with seeing it fall from the sky with a blinding light right near them and going out and finding a new rock often burning hot or too hot to had touch at the bottom of a crater. It's wishful thinking.  It is not what happens when a rock falls from space. Meteorites do not make holes, they don't burn, they don't light up from friction, and you won't see one shooting trail across the sky going all the way to the ground near you. 

Meteorites do not make holes. They land at the same speed as if you had dropped the same sized rock for a Cessna airplane. Each rock or meteorite would slow to it's terminal velocity based on air resistance. A bowling ball, or your rock, would slow to about 200 MPH. When it hit the ground it might break, or dent asphalt, but it would not make a crater. The terminal velocity of smaller stones is even lower. Galileo be damned. It would take a single stone the size of an eight passenger van to maintain enough velocity to make a crater as had occurred in Carancas, Peru, 27 Sep 2007.

Meteorites come in at hypersonic 25,000 to 40,000 MPH velocities. At just below 60 miles high the air compacts at the front of the rock by ram pressure. The air itself becomes charged and fluorescences in brilliant light immediately expanding outward from the incoming meteor along its streak, which is actually what everyone sees when they see a meteor shoot across the sky. Think about it. The typical meteor is the size of a grain of rice. You can't see that 60 miles up. I don't care how bright it is. I repeat. What you are actually seeing is the instantaneously fluorescent atmosphere created by ram pressure along the meteor's path and not the actual rock. That same ram pressure heats up the outer surface and ablates (shatters) the meteor. Most are disintegrated and go off at about to 40 miles high. The very rare bollide that could produce a strewnfield of stones on the ground will go dark at about 35 to 25 miles high. All meteors will go dark after they drop below about 4500 MPH as they will no longer be enough pressure to produce light. 

Dark flight begins in the lower atmosphere as the meteorites continue to decelerate, but now producing sonic booms. They drop subsonic below 40 to 25 miles high. The trail of stones will become quite long with larger ones traveling farther that smaller fragments. When they reach terminal velocity for that sized stone they will lose nearly all of their forward momentum and drop nearly straight down being buffeted by the jet stream and atmospheric winds.

The interior temperature of meteoriods in space is about  -250 F. In the lower atmosphere the just-heated outer surface of incoming meteorites are blasted and chilled by the -60F of ever thickening air. Just fallen meteorites are usually warm to the touch, but not too hot to touch. Sometimes larger ones are icy cold as the interior re-chills the surface. The cannot start fires, in spite of the promulgated dubious Wisconsin-Chicago fire theory. (You should read my tutorial, "How to make a landing site for a meteorite." 31 Jan 31 2019.)

Fresh meteorite falls are found on top of the ground by eyesight or by a magnet stick. Old falls containing larger stones or irons are buried much deeper and are often found by metal detectors. The reason that older fall meteorites are buried is normally not because they made a crater that deep, but that being much denser than the surrounding soil and boulders they sink slowly due to settling over the centuries. (See the depth of the Civil War bullets in my "Not Everything that Pings is a Meteorite" article 18 Dec 2018.)

Cheers!

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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There was no light or anything as far as he can tell, he lives on top of a hill in a low populated area. He just came home one day and found it in the backyard, he is on older person and a family friend, about 10y ago or less, there was no crater just a hole not rather big. The rock was the size of few of these in the photos combined. I don't see what else could it be, i will try to calculate density.

15534315426856764860346964444111.jpg

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Posted (edited)

BillPeters, do you have these pre-written, or do you snap these off in a flash...

excellent explanation!

nice resume too

fred

Edited by fredmason
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Popac,

Why didn't you mention he was an older person who lived on top of a hill? That changes everything! You definitely have a Martian Meteorite because they only fall on hilltops where older fellows live. :arrowheadsmiley:

We can identify rocks and meteorites pretty good around here. We suck at changing opinions that have been formed on assumptions that are incorrect. 

Most of the time it is much easier to identify the specimen as a terrestrial mineral or rock rather than prove it is a meteorite. 

You said, " I don't see what else could it be"  but I can think of several minerals it could be. Schist or galena (or some other polymetallic sulphide) comes to mind. Schorl, peridotite/olivinite, and several minerals that form in pegmatites could look exactly like your photos.

If we drop the assumptions it is a Martian meteorite based on not knowing what else it could be we could identify this common terrestrial material! Why don't we identify the specimen based on scientific observation? Let's look at hardness, density, streak and texture and determine what it is!

 

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1 hour ago, fredmason said:

BillPeters, do you have these pre-written, or do you snap these off in a flash...

excellent explanation!

nice resume too

fred

Fredmason,

Actually, I write these off in a flash because I feel passionate about it. My exception is the oft repeated standard explanation of meteorite characteristics for the newbies.

billpeters

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4 hours ago, Popac said:

There was no light or anything as far as he can tell, he lives on top of a hill in a low populated area. He just came home one day and found it in the backyard, he is on older person and a family friend, about 10y ago or less, there was no crater just a hole not rather big. The rock was the size of few of these in the photos combined. I don't see what else could it be, i will try to calculate density.

15534315426856764860346964444111.jpg

Looks like a sulphide of some type.

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It is 99% identical as the rock in this video. Let me know what you think thank you. I don't see a reason why my friend would lie to me, the way it appeared it could have come only from above. Thank you for your responses.

https://youtu.be/OI9PWViGAXQ

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39 minutes ago, Popac said:

It is 99% identical as the rock in this video. Let me know what you think thank you. I don't see a reason why my friend would lie to me, the way it appeared it could have come only from above. Thank you for your responses.

https://youtu.be/OI9PWViGAXQ

It's definitely not a meteorite. Chip off a small piece and use a hammer to reduce it to a powder. Smear a little bit on a piece of white paper with your finger. . Let us know what color it is.

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Hey everyone, i have calculated the density and done streak marks on porculain. Density is between 2.05-2.15. It does not attract magnet hanging on a thread, and does not attract needle hanging on a thread. Streak marks are grey-silverish, similar to the colour of the rock, pencil like. I'm open to any suggestions now you might have about what it is. Thank you for responses

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1 hour ago, Popac said:

Hey everyone, i have calculated the density and done streak marks on porculain. Density is between 2.05-2.15. It does not attract magnet hanging on a thread, and does not attract needle hanging on a thread. Streak marks are grey-silverish, similar to the colour of the rock, pencil like. I'm open to any suggestions now you might have about what it is. Thank you for responses

Popac
I find hot rocks left in the bottom of pre-dug holes all the time.

specific gravity of graphite is around 2.25

 its pencil lead.

AzNuggetBob

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Yep, that's what it looks like. But that begs the question.... what in the world is that doing in someones backyard? 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Morlock said:

Yep, that's what it looks like. But that begs the question....what in the world is that doing in someones backyard?  

If the question is "is this a Martian Meteorite?" then the answer is easy. No it is not.

If the question is "what kind of terrestrial mineral is this?" then graphite is as close as you are going to get given the info provided.

If the question now is "what in the world is that doing in someone's backyard?" we have gone down a different path entirely. 

My guess is someone picked it up and carried it around for a while. They thought it might be a meteorite. It looked "different". They had never seen a rock like that. They found it at the bottom of a hole and deduced that it must have come from above and therefore had to be a meteorite. Because they could think of no other explanation it just had to be. They tried to stick a magnet to it and since it was a non-magnetic meteorite they deduced that it had to be from Mars. Then, after much discussion with people that knew stuff about rocks they realized that it was not a meteorite but a hunk of graphite that is very common to the area.

They carried the rock around for a while thinking about how cool it would be to have found a valuable meteorite. But it was just a shiny rock that had cast some kind of spell on them. They decided to rid themselves of the stone. One day they were walking by that old guy's house on the hill and they chucked it over the fence. The next morning the old man found the rock in his back yard. It was shiny and strange and he had no clue where it came from. All he knew is it had to have "fallen from above" so it must be a meteorite.

Then the cycle repeats itself. 

:)

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
The stone must be cursed. It causes men to make incorrect assumptions. I can think of no other explanation so it must be so.
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11 hours ago, Morlock said:

Yep, that's what it looks like. But that begs the question.... what in the world is that doing in someones backyard? 

Hey I found gold nuggets upwards of 3 ounces each on the edge of a new subdivision in a friends back yard in people's valley, Az. 
It happens.
but it wasn't in a pre-dug hole.
(Model creek placers)
Sorry about the focus and flash it was my first selfie.

selfe 002.JPG

AzNuggetBob

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I see a Martian, but no meteorite.. :4chsmu1:

Swamp

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Hey I found gold nuggets upwards of 3 ounces each on the edge of a new subdivision in a friends back yard in people's valley, Az. 
It happens.
but it wasn't in a pre-dug hole.
(Model creek placers)
Sorry about the focus and flash it was my first selfie.

selfe 002.JPG

AzNuggetBob

Those are rare golden meteorites Bob! They had to have fallen from the sky to get in that guy's back yard like that. And since they are non-magnetic that would indicate they are Martian meteorites. Because Martian meteorites are non-magnetic!

Golden Martian Meteorites dude! They must be worth many fortunes! :yesss:

 

 

:4chsmu1:

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
To add snark and emoticons.
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