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Popac

Martian meteorite?

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16 hours ago, Swampstomper Al said:

I see a Martian, but no meteorite.. :4chsmu1:

Swamp

Swampstomper 

Ya caught me, the Martians are coming and we are going to eat all your gold!

AzNuggetBob

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17 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Those are rare golden meteorites Bob! They had to have fallen from the sky to get in that guy's back yard like that. And since they are non-magnetic that would indicate they are Martian meteorites. Because Martian meteorites are non-magnetic!

Golden Martian Meteorites dude! They must be worth many fortunes! :yesss:

 

 

:4chsmu1:

 

Wow Bedrock Bob
Thanks for all the great info on it. I almost threw it away. 
I thought it was just another one of those pesky ordinary gold nuggets out in the back yard. 
AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob

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You know, Popac, that's a beautiful rock. I don't know what it is, but I am curious for you to get a geologist's hands on analysis and share it with us. You should display it. 

Cheers!

billpeters

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Thank you all for responses, i have read about graphite and how to identify it that you can chip it with your fingernails and leaves your fingers dirty and that it should leave pencil like marks on white surfaces and he does not, also on all the pictures it is entirely shiny grey, this rock projects also other colours. I already wrote that this rock is just a piece of a bigger one. The original look of the rock (the outside part) before it was broken can be seen on one of the photos i will post now, so it was the size of few of these combined so chances of someone casually dropping in into my friends backyard are slim because it was heavier and bigget then the rock in the picture. Also, today i put a cube of ice on top of it too se how it reacts and the cube started melting instantly and fast, what could thst mean?

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58 minutes ago, Popac said:

 Also, today i put a cube of ice on top of it too se how it reacts and the cube started melting instantly and fast, what could thst mean?

Means it's warm today.  Have you seen those weather rocks?  If the rock is wet, it's raining, etc.

Does not appear to be a meteorite, sorry.

Edited by Mikestang

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Thank you everyone for responses. Any opinion what it could be? I believe the original crust (outside) looks like this part of it. How were these bubbles formed?

 

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Edited by Popac

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mars has the largest volcanoes in our solar system.

them bubbles were caused by gas escaping from molten material, a sure sign for being a Martian meteorite.

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Oh my....

And this is why I love the topic and learning more about the hobby. Good ol' graphite.

Image result for graphite

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4 hours ago, Jayray said:

Oh my....

And this is why I love the topic and learning more about the hobby. Good ol' graphite.

Image result for graphite

Oh my, i already wrote in my previous post that it does not have graphite characteristics, you can chip graphite with your fingers and it leaves your fingers dirty, and you can literaly write with graphite, that was one of the first minerals i checked it for.

Edited by Popac
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3 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Then that settles it. You have a Martian meteorite! Congrats! :yesss: :oregonian_winesmiley: :worship:

 

What is wrong with you people, i am no longer claiming it with certainty to be a meteorite, let alone Martian. I am trying to figure out what it actually is, there are many possibilities every option is open, could you stop with the ridicul it is realy boresome. I don't know about your need to ridicul and play important but it is not welcome here if you have nothing constructive to contribute. Thank you everyone for responses. Here are the pictures showing the colours of one side of the rock it looks mesmerizing. Any opinions?

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Edited by Popac
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3 hours ago, Popac said:

What is wrong with you people, i am no longer claiming it with certainty to be a meteorite, let alone Martian. I am trying to figure out what it actually is, there are many possibilities every option is open, could you stop with the ridicul it is realy boresome. I don't know about your need to ridicul and play important but it is not welcome here if you have nothing constructive to contribute. Thank you everyone for responses. Here are the pictures showing the colours of one side of the rock it looks mesmerizing. Any opinions?

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Yes. I have an opinion. And I have already given it to you. So has Morlock. A metallic sulphide. There are many and most are (for all practical purposes) indistinguishable. Lets call it "pyrite" until you can figure out exactly what suite of metals has combined with Sulphur and created your specimen.

Most sulphides are poly metallic. You need to have a sample analyzed to find out exactly what it is called. The term "pyrite" or "sulphide" describes a whole array of metals combined with Sulphur and not a specific mineral. If you want to know the specific mineral then you really need someone to do an analysis and see exactly what is in there.

You are not going to identify a sulphide ore visually on the internet. Even old copper miners argue over which "pyrite" is what. The term "poly-metallic sulphide" is as accurate and as close as you are going to get.

I honestly hope you see the humor in my responses. It is just a rock and we are all rock guys around here. I certainly did not mean any disrespect nor did I intent to cause you any frustration. Just having a little fun is all. If I ruffled your feathers I apologize. And I hate to tell you but I will probably ruffle them again at some point.

If you want to prove it is a sulphide mineral simply strike it with a small hammer hard enough to crush some of the material. You will smell the Sulphur. Like firecrackers. A lot of ore will faintly smell of Sulphur for years after being broken. Some won't smell as much. But most will be stinky when you smash a bit with a hammer.

 

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It is much easier to distinguish gold from other mineral, not so much with meteorites. One thing I have learned first hand, someone who believes they have a meteorite, have a very hard time being told it is not. Just say'n. Seen it many, many times.

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7 hours ago, Popac said:

 

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The sheen I'm seeing.resembles the ones I see on bournite. I'm certainly not 100% sure it's bournite but that's about the.best I can come up with based on the information you've provided.

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Ok people, i know it is a long shot but only mineral i found reflecting that colour and pieces of crystals is moissanite which is natural silicon carbide found in meteorites. Anyone familiar with moissanite, i admit i am not?

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Also, sorry for double post. Can someone with more experience explain to me are these chondrules or what could it be?  Other 2 pictures are surface chondrules on known meteorites it looks almost the same, is there a way for them to form beside meteorites. Thank you

 

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Martian meteorites are Achondrites ....They do not have chondrules. Only the many many different types of chondrite meteorites have chondrules. If it was a chondrite it would be attracted to a magnate.

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Popac,

Lots of good sleuthing. Lots of good deductions. You're getting closer. Now you need to take it to a hands on geologist and get a more definitive answer. 

We await the results.

Cheers!

billpeters

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My guess is a chalcobornitical telluritic ferromagnesian arsenide with a twist of lemon. But only an assay and a vato experienced in this sort of mineral could say for sure.

It came from a massive sulphide deposit. Probably the closest one to the hilltop the old man lived on. Chances are it is the ore of (chiefly) copper. If you tell us the location of where it was found we may find that it is near a copper mining operation. From there we may be able to draw some straight lines.

 

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Just wanted to share with you a picture i took of the rock with my phone with pro effect and lowered light trying to capture only colour of the crystals. It looks mesmerizing. You can see it the best if you put your phone brightness to max! cheers

 

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Edited by Popac

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I tried to zoom as much as i could to the crystals in the rock. It is identical to natural moissanite that is mostly found in meteorites. Second in hardness to diamond. Your opinion, is there a home test? Thank you

 

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Mesmerizing...

Whack it good with a hammer. You will be able to smell the Sulphur. It is a polymetallic sulphide ore.

It is not silicon carbide. You can easily test this by testing for hardness or observing how it powders rather than breaking down into smaller, ragged edged shards. It does not have the crystal structure of SiCa, the hardness or the appearance. Aditionally, SiCa does not leave a streak on porcelain and your observation was a dark, pencil like streak. 

It is exactly what it appears to be. A polymetallic sulphide. A very common class of minerals.

 

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48 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Mesmerizing...

Whack it good with a hammer. You will be able to smell the Sulphur. It is a polymetallic sulphide ore.

It is not silicon carbide. You can easily test this by testing for hardness or observing how it powders rather than breaking down into smaller, ragged edged shards. It does not have the crystal structure of SiCa, the hardness or the appearance. Aditionally, SiCa does not leave a streak on porcelain and your observation was a dark, pencil like streak. 

It is exactly what it appears to be. A polymetallic sulphide. A very common class of minerals.

 

It is not made from the crystals and they are not everywhere. When i try to pierce them with a knife it just slides without making anything while on the other parts knife leaves a mark when i press it hard. I did not streak the crystals because of the angle.

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