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Strapped

ASU Meteorite Vault

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I had the day off today. My home is being remodeled so it is dirty, dusty and workers banging around. It was also a cold rainy day. I wanted to get out of the house so I decided  to drive the 10 minutes to Arizona State University to check out their meteorite display and see what was new. While there I bumped into Dr. Garvie who was just beginning a tour of the meteorite vault for some grad students. Dr. Garvie remembered me from some of my meteorite finds I have brought to their open houses in the past and invited me in with the students! It was one hour I won't soon forget. I'll attach some pictures.

Students.jpg

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Here is a sample of the recent Cuba fall. Best example of shock veins I have ever seen.

Cuba.jpg

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Here is a large Allende meteorite. They left the grass on it to show that meteorites are not hot when they hit the ground.

AllendeGrass.jpg

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This is a graphite nodule from a Canyon Diablo meteorite where the graphite turned to diamond during the impact.

GraphiteNodule.jpg

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Right on Strapped, right place at the right time huh :thumbsupanim Did you learn something new that you might share with us? Anyway good going, you hit the mother lode of meteorites! :4chsmu1:                               h.t.

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56 minutes ago, hardtimehermit said:

Right on Strapped, right place at the right time huh :thumbsupanim Did you learn something new that you might share with us? Anyway good going, you hit the mother lode of meteorites! :4chsmu1:                               h.t.

Dr Garvie was pretty excited about the graphite nodule where the graphite turned to diamond. He said it was a very recent discovery. He actually took it out of the case and passed it around so we could all take a closer look. I took the picture after it was back in the case.

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Thanks for posting these photos!

All I can say is WOW, that's a lot of meteorites!!!

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Eric,

  That sounds like an great time at ASU, so much to see and learn... thanks for sharing.

Dave

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What a great day, thanks for sharing.

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WAY Cool - Thank you for sharing your fantastic photos!:thumbsupanim

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15 hours ago, Strapped said:

Dr Garvie was pretty excited about the graphite nodule where the graphite turned to diamond. He said it was a very recent discovery. He actually took it out of the case and passed it around so we could all take a closer look. I took the picture after it was back in the case.

I am curious if Dr. Garvie spoke about lonsdaleite. It seems scientists have not been able to fully agree about Canyon Diablo diamonds and weather or not they are lonsdaleite, which is a high pressure mineral three times as hard as diamond. That impact diamond or lonsdaleite sure would make an awesome ring! I love Canyon Diablo it was my first iron meteorite, now if i could just find the little diamonds.:brows:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      h.t.

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Schweeet..! And I'm not even into meteorites.. From a hunting perspective, that is..
Or perhaps better put is to say I wasn't -- until I began eyeballing this forum..
Gotta admit my curiosity at least now has the better of me from a searcher's viewpoint..
Unlike Rocky though I believe I'd be a tetch harder pressed to find one in my back yard,
although seems to me there has been a fairly recent sighting / fall in the panhandle... :hiker:

Swamp

EDIT: PS -- Did any of the students take pictures, especially since these days for most folks
doing so is as simple as taking out one's phone -- no extra equipment needed.. Or were they
tripping on the thought they'd have access to those rooms for the rest of their days..? Just
curious is all, since sometimes the getting of education doesn't require the going into debt but
rather the not only being in the right place at the right time but also just happening to know the
person holding the keys via previous subject-at-hand pro-am encounters.. I have a feeling the
good Dr. got as much of a charge out of (being able to) bring you along as you got from being asked
and able to go.. That man will never forget who you are and you now have a great 1st person contact, all
from going to "check out what's new at the museum.." Kewl..!

Edited by Swampstomper Al
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Thanks, I have not been there since the late 1980's...they had many of Ninningers collection on display back then...thanks for the photos

fred

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2 hours ago, hardtimehermit said:

I am curious if Dr. Garvie spoke about lonsdaleite. It seems scientists have not been able to fully agree about Canyon Diablo diamonds and weather or not they are lonsdaleite, which is a high pressure mineral three times as hard as diamond. That impact diamond or lonsdaleite sure would make an awesome ring! I love Canyon Diablo it was my first iron meteorite, now if i could just find the little diamonds.:brows:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      h.t.

H.T.   

Unfortunately, I don't have much of a science background. I am the guy who has to constantly refer back to the periodic table when reading meteoritic articles. He did not bring up lonsdalieite. One of the students was a current student at The Center for Meteorite Studies studying Calcium Aluminum Inclusions (CAIs). He and Dr Garvie discussed CAIs for a while too. They passed around a large slice of an Allende meteorite that had a large CAI.

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2 hours ago, Swampstomper Al said:

Schweeet..! And I'm not even into meteorites.. From a hunting perspective, that is..
Or perhaps better put is to say I wasn't -- until I began eyeballing this forum..
Gotta admit my curiosity at least now has the better of me from a searcher's viewpoint..
Unlike Rocky though I believe I'd be a tetch harder pressed to find one in my back yard,
although seems to me there has been a fairly recent sighting / fall in the panhandle... :hiker:

Swamp

EDIT: PS -- Did any of the students take pictures, especially since these days for most folks
doing so is as simple as taking out one's phone -- no extra equipment needed.. Or were they
tripping on the thought they'd have access to those rooms for the rest of their days..? Just
curious is all, since sometimes the getting of education doesn't require the going into debt but
rather the not only being in the right place at the right time but also just happening to know the
person holding the keys via previous subject-at-hand pro-am encounters.. I have a feeling the
good Dr. got as much of a charge out of (being able to) bring you along as you got from being asked
and able to go.. That man will never forget who you are and you now have a great 1st person contact, all
from going to "check out what's new at the museum.." Kewl..!

Swamp,

A few of the students took some pictures. I was clearly the most excited to be there! I am pretty sure most of the students were applying to the School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE). Only a couple of the students expressed an interest in studying meteorites. When the tour ended Dr. Garvie spent an additional 20 minutes or so with me just talking meteorites.

SESE is having an open house today. I'll probably head back there today.

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Wow, what a cool tour to stumble in on!

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On 2/23/2019 at 9:42 AM, hardtimehermit said:

I am curious if Dr. Garvie spoke about lonsdaleite. It seems scientists have not been able to fully agree about Canyon Diablo diamonds and weather or not they are , which is a high pressure mineral three times as hard as diamond. That impact diamond or lonsdaleite sure would make an awesome ring! I love Canyon Diablo it was my first iron meteorite, now if i could just find the little diamonds.:brows:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      h.t.

I find it hard to believe anything natural could be 3 times harder then a diamond. I keep up to date on subjects like this and have never heard of lonsdaleite until now.

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1 hour ago, Morlock said:

I find it hard to believe anything natural could be 3 times harder then a diamond. I keep up to date on subjects like this and have never heard of lonsdaleite until now.

According to the linked article there are 2 that are/maybe (I put the maybe in there because I have read other articles that some researchers have their doubts because of how rare both of these are, but other researchers say it is so)

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16610-diamond-no-longer-natures-hardest-material/

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2 hours ago, Morlock said:

I find it hard to believe anything natural could be 3 times harder then a diamond. I keep up to date on subjects like this and have never heard of lonsdaleite until now.

Your right Morlock, my bad what i meant was it take 3 times the pressure to create lonsdaleite. 

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