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steelguy

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Just posted something in NEW MEMBERS that I dont want to repeat again here.  If anyone has any thoughts on it, I would appreciate reading them.  Thanks!

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weighs 74 pounds and measures 16"x12"X4-1/2"

meteorite #1.jpg

meteorite #4.jpg

meteorite #2.jpg

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Really nice looking meteorite. Probably cost and arm and a leg. Thanks for posting.

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2 hours ago, steelguy said:

weighs 74 pounds and measures 16"x12"X4-1/2"

 

Yes that is a real beautiful iron!!

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Thanks, I hope it proves to be a meteorite.  The more I read, and I haven't stopped reading for the last 2 weeks!, the more I am blown away by meteorites!  i have always been a big fan of rocks, but this takes it to a whole new level, excuse the pun.  My brother-in-law says it weighs 74 pounds, but I would guess more.  Presently being sent to me for testing at Rutgers University at the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, who was recommended by The Museum of Natural History in NYC.  I will keep you posted with what they find out.

 

Edited by steelguy
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Good morning steelguy, i am going out on a limb here, and saying you have a meteorite. :fl:     h.t.

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Looks like a Gibeon, cleaned and everything.  Are you claiming to have found it?

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Warning, It may not be (assuming it is not an already known purchased meteorite specimen). I picked up one found in AZ by an elderly gentleman heavily magnetic which looking very much like a mesosiderite. Reuben Garcia was able to visually discern that it wasn't.  I took it to Blaine Reed with his analysis 'gun' who confirmed that it definitely was not a meteorite.

Steelguy's rock really looks very much like an amazing iron, but professional analysis and documentation is required.

billpeters

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I might be wrong but I'm under the impression this meteorite was found in Brazil..I thought I saw that in another post.

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I thought steelguy said it came from Tucson show and that his friend or family member bought it years ago. 

55 minutes ago, Morlock said:

I might be wrong but I'm under the impression this meteorite was found in Brazil..I thought I saw that in another post.

 

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2 hours ago, Mikestang said:

Looks like a Gibeon, cleaned and everything.  Are you claiming to have found it?

 

1 hour ago, Morlock said:

I might be wrong but I'm under the impression this meteorite was found in Brazil..I thought I saw that in another post.

 

1 hour ago, hardtimehermit said:

I thought steelguy said it came from Tucson show and that his friend or family member bought it years ago. 

 

Below is what Steelguy posted in the new members section.

Totally fascinating to read the forums and begin to learn more!  Real quality posts by all, thanks.  I recently came into possession of a large sample weighing 74 pounds I am going to have analyzed by a local university lab.  Very exciting for me.  I have attached 2 photos, the second showing a silver, polished spot that sure looks like steel.  The sample also has a 1/8" hole in it.

On 2/22/2019 at 12:45 PM, steelguy said:

yup.  My brother-in-law purchased it around 2000 at the Tuscon Meteorite, Mineral and Gem show.  The seller was from Latin America and my brother-in-law thinks he remembers being told it was from Patagonia.  That is the extent of the background known.  Although he was given paperwork, it now he can not find it.  I have checked with a few labs and The Museum of Natural History in NYC suggest getting in touch with a Dr. Gross at Rutgers.  She reviewed the photos and said she would be glad to look at the stone and do analysis if she believes it is warranted.  So, hopefully I am in the process of having it shipped to me and then I will go meet with her.  He has bills that need to be paid so hopefully this will help towards that.  Attached photo shows the 1/8" hole.  Great fun!

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4 hours ago, Au Seeker said:

 

 

Below is what Steelguy posted in the new members section.

Totally fascinating to read the forums and begin to learn more!  Real quality posts by all, thanks.  I recently came into possession of a large sample weighing 74 pounds I am going to have analyzed by a local university lab.  Very exciting for me.  I have attached 2 photos, the second showing a silver, polished spot that sure looks like steel.  The sample also has a 1/8" hole in it.

Patagonia...I missed it by a few hundred miles.

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So, hopefully to clarify, let me explain further.  My brother-in-law purchased this sample in or about 2000 at the Tuscon Show.  He is now in his mid 70's and not the best of health.  He remembers being told by the seller, who was form Latin America that the sample, which he was told was a "meteorite" came from Patagonia.  He believes he received paperwork, but could find nothing when he recently looked for those papers.  I have offered to try to have it analyzed and if it proves to in fact actually be a meteorite, have it officially registered.  With this in mind, I have contacted a few labs and some recognized collectors and asked for their recommendations on what steps need to be taken.  The Museum of Natural History in NYC pointed me at Rutgers University's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.  In turn, a professor at Rutgers reviewed the photos and has invited me to bring the rock in and will then make an initial review and, if warranted, will go through the process of analysis.  To my limited understanding, this is the story to the best of my knowledge.  If there is to be an actual eventual sale, it will be to the full benefit of my brother-in-law.  My reward is simply starting a fascinating journey of learning about something that has totally engulfed my imagination!  I am blown away by all of this!

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I have a question: assuming for the moment this stone is a meteorite, is there any chance with proper analysis that it can be positively linked to a known fall?  Sort of like the way DNA works?

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Yes is the answer to your question, but it could cost you a bit, but with the value of the meteorite to consider you might want to take that route. Ask the people at Rutgers and see what they advise.:)   h.t.

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18 hours ago, steelguy said:

I have a question: assuming for the moment this stone is a meteorite, is there any chance with proper analysis that it can be positively linked to a known fall?  Sort of like the way DNA works?

They call that "pairing" in the meteorite world; your meteorite may be paired to an already know find.  There are several well know irons from that part of South America, most notably Campo del Cielo.  Once the results of the analysis are in the scientist can compare to other known irons and render an opinion as to whether it is paired or not.

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Thanks for the advice and education with the term "pairing".

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Just an update, I have a meeting with Rutgers on Thursday afternoon for the initial review.  If that proves positive, the next option for me is to proceed an analysis, the extent of which varies by degree of identification and takes some time.  This part of it begins costing money, but my understanding is that with proper authentication, the Meteoritical Society approves all new meteorite names and classifications and records them  in the Meteoritical Bulletin, all of which adds value to the meteorite.

 

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contact doctor gross at rutgers. she may not be back from Antarctica yet.

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Posted (edited)

So here is the update:  I met with Dr. Gross this afternoon and she immediately confirmed that it was in fact a meteorite and a very large one at that!  Testing will begin in approximately 3 weeks and she said that I would be welcome to watch the lab process.   She said she believed the small 1/8" was most likely drilled for testing purposes and not naturally formed during entry.  A small 20 gram sample will be taken for the Rutger's analysis and a second much larger slice, about 2" or so will be removed and eventually sent to The Meteorological Society along with the Rutger's analysis for their purpose of review and hopefully acceptance.  This larger piece will be halved, with one section staying with MS for their archive and the other half being made available for outside scientific study.  If this all goes well, the meteorite will then be named and numbered.  I requested and Dr. Gross has agreed to polish and treat with the acid solution the large cut surface on the meteorite in order to show the Widmanstatten pattern, which I can't wait to see!

Edited by steelguy
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We all suspected it was a meteorite. The only question now is if it pairs with another fall.

Can't wait to the lab results.

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Posted (edited)

Well, it has been awhile, but the date for slicing at Rutgers University's meteorite department machine lab is set for June 3.  Upon initial observation, the PHD immediately and definitely identified the rock as a meteorite.  It was explained to me that a small section, about the size of a thumb would be sliced for analysis.  A second large piece would also be sliced and then half into 2 pieces and forwarded to the Meteorological Society for their review, hopeful naming/numbering and archiving, the second piece of which would be made available for second party research. Actual analysis will be an additional couple of months from now.   This is all mind-blowing to me!  I know nothing of meteorites and to think something that weighs 70+ pounds could fall out of space and landed on our planet-------insane!!  And  to be 400 million years old!

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On 3/5/2019 at 5:11 PM, steelguy said:

Just an update, I have a meeting with Rutgers on Thursday afternoon for the initial review.  If that proves positive, the next option for me is to proceed an analysis, the extent of which varies by degree of identification and takes some time.  This part of it begins costing money, but my understanding is that with proper authentication, the Meteoritical Society approves all new meteorite names and classifications and records them  in the Meteoritical Bulletin, all of which adds value to the meteorite.

 

Let's hope.

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I'm anxious to see the results as well. While we knew it was a meteorite, we didn't know it if paired with another fall. 

Keep us posted.

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Yes, i will be surprised if it's not a paired meteorite, and steelguy will be one lucky guy!

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