Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Bedrock Bob

A few oddities

Recommended Posts

36 minutes ago, Swampstomper Al said:

Good read..! Here's a link I have to some additional info on this scam, included in a Hausel report on Wyoming geology and the geology of the stateline region: 
https://www.geowyo.com/wyoming-diamonds.html
Included are photos of the scammers, the scammees and comparison / contrast photos of precious gemstones against their look-alike diamond-indicator minerals.. Hausel also states he just recently panned out some of the bogus stuff planted 100 years ago.. Surprise..! :yikes:  Normally I'd take that kind of surprise every day, especially if they were what I was actually looking for at the time..

Swamp

Thanks for the link. That's pretty interesting. I wonder what $28,000 in rough gemstones from 1872 would be worth today. Considering they only salted an acre, it might be worth doing research to see if one could find that location. 

Anyone here from northern Colorado or southern Wyoming? If I was still out west, I'd probably check this out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Morlock said:

Thanks for the link. That's pretty interesting. I wonder what $28,000 in rough gemstones from 1872 would be worth today. Considering they only salted an acre, it might be worth doing research to see if one could find that location. 

Anyone here from northern Colorado or southern Wyoming? If I was still out west, I'd probably check this out.

I was thinking the same thing, if I was still out west.. The crazy part is is that when I get all psyched over things like these I think I'm still living in Tucson n start saying to myself stuff like: "Hey -- it isn't really all that far to the Feather River" or "Ya know, I should be able to make it from here to Cheyenne in one 18 hour shot no problem.. Just about everywhere else in the district is closer except for the Iron Mountain area.."

And then I wake up n remember I'm living on that pirate radio station platform four miles east of Cocoa Beach n not in the south bank of Tanque Verde Wash n my hopes & dreams are dashed n shattered yet once again..

But yo, on the bright side: Inflation is only up approx. 1,817% cumulative change here in the U.S. of A. since 1870.. Sooo, this means assuming all else being equal you should be able to grab that $28K worth of gemstones for, lessee now, a mere $508,760.00 -- a steal here at twice the price..! How so..? Welll, if ya had to head back to London for 'em, England's cumulative change since 1870 is right at 11,400%.. That means they would cost only, uhhhh, never mind -- you really don't want to know..:th:

Swamp

PS -- Bonus drooler: 
Credit: GIA & Robison McMurty

image.png

The 1.70 ct Montana ruby alongside rough pink to purple corundum samples from the GIA reference collection. These reference samples, collected from Montana’s Eldorado Bar along the Missouri River and Wildcat Gulch, part of the Rock Creek deposit, were used to help determine the country of origin. Photo by Robison McMurtry.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Swampstomper Al said:

 

But yo, on the bright side: Inflation is only up approx. 1,817% cumulative change here in the U.S. of A. since 1870.. Sooo, this means assuming all else being equal you should be able to grab that $28K worth of gemstones for, lessee now, a mere $508,760.00 -- a steal here at twice the price..! How so..? Welll, if ya had to head back to London for 'em, England's cumulative change since 1870 is right at 11,400%.. That means they would cost only, uhhhh, never mind -- you really don't want to know..:th:

Swamp

PS -- Bonus drooler: 
Credit: GIA & Robison McMurty

image.png

The 1.70 ct Montana ruby alongside rough pink to purple corundum samples from the GIA reference collection. These reference samples, collected from Montana’s Eldorado Bar along the Missouri River and Wildcat Gulch, part of the Rock Creek deposit, were used to help determine the country of origin. Photo by Robison McMurtry.

I just wonder how.many pounds of gemstones were salted? No doubt some have been recovered but certainly there's a lot to be found yet. That would be a neat treasure hunt if someone could find the location. Wonder if it's on BLM land or private property. Also wonder if someone could file a claim on it. 

I'm wondering a lot this morning.:inocent:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Morlock said:

I just wonder how.many pounds of gemstones were salted? No doubt some have been recovered but certainly there's a lot to be found yet. That would be a neat treasure hunt if someone could find the location. Wonder if it's on BLM land or private property. Also wonder if someone could file a claim on it. 

I'm wondering a lot this morning.:inocent:

I too wonder how much was salted..

Because, ya see, another first thing I need to do is fix my silliness about diamond pricing / prices.. Diamond valuation in days of yore had nothing to do with post industrial revolution cumulative or absolute inflation.. They've always been rare, valuable and expensive.. Up until Kimberley (or was it Argyle?) diamonds were almost entirely water born finds.. Only once they started being pulled out of matrix and supply started catching up with demand...

I've only ever found one source who even tried to place a monitary equivalency tie to diamonds in "dollars" and lemme tell ya there have been times throughout history when even at their cheapest they were much more pricey than they are today.. The report I mention was published in 1934 and he tries to value back to around 700 BC.. Diamond prices throughout this time span ranged anywhere from equivalent $48 ct. -- $700+ ct. as well as being location dependent.. There is a mention of diamond being traded at six gold staters per caret, which I guess would be about year zero + - .. I don't know if that was a good deal or not though..

Diamond wasn't always #1 on the hit parade either.. In some places at some times diamond was valued beneath ruby; ruby & emerald; ruby & pearl; ruby / emerald / sapphire; ruby / emerald / pearl / sapphire..

Anyhowww, before I said anything more that's gonna live on in the cyberaethernets forever I wanted to fix that li'l bit of haha cuteness..

So, ok -- I know where this location is, approximately.. I also know of someone who knows a whole lot better than I where the location is; the person who said this: " ...In 1871 and 1872, one of the greatest mining scams took place in the Wyoming Territory...More than a 100 years later, I panned 4 diamonds, 17 rubies and 24 pyrope garnets from the location: all 1872 salt... .. " I suppose we could always call 'em up n ask where exactly..? If nothing else we should be able to at least find out if it's claimed or not, wouldn't one think..? :89:

It's either BLM or N.P.R.; too close to tell cos there's some withdrawal that isn't too clearly identified.. Naturally I'm hoping for the best...

Swamp
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you be able to file a claim on it then sell it? Imagine salting a few gold nuggets someplace, then filing a claim and selling it. I'm sure it's been tried and done but it's certainly not ethical. Legally it might be a different matter.

 

 

  • Hmmmmmm 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be cool to locate that acre and recover one of those gems just for the sake of the hunt. It would be a great treasure hunt IMHO.

Very few could say they found one of those gems. It seems the collectors value may be far greater than any value the stone(s) might have as a gem. 

It would sure make a great treasure story...:inocent:

  • Hmmmmmm 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

 

Very few could say they found one of those gems. It seems the collectors value may be far greater than any value the stone(s) might have as a gem. 

It would sure make a great treasure story...:inocent:

I was thinking the same thing. With trip photos and other documentation, I'd like to think one could get a premium for those stones.

  • Hmmmmmm 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Morlock said:

Would you be able to file a claim on it then sell it? Imagine salting a few gold nuggets someplace, then filing a claim and selling it. I'm sure it's been tried and done but it's certainly not ethical. Legally it might be a different matter.

 

 

 

17 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

It would be cool to locate that acre and recover one of those gems just for the sake of the hunt. It would be a great treasure hunt IMHO.

Very few could say they found one of those gems. It seems the collectors value may be far greater than any value the stone(s) might have as a gem. 

It would sure make a great treasure story...:inocent:

Welll, if anyone wants to give it a go... The recovery quote & Wyoming Territory comes from W. Dan Hauser.. I'm pretty sure the Diamond Peak, CO info comes from Mr. Hauser as well.. Something to note though is as Wyoming State Geologist for however many years and etc. etc. Mr. Hauser developed many contacts and had access to & permissions for a whole buncha places we'll never be able to get.. I have no idea what the actual land status is for Diamond Peak.. I believe its location falls just outside the boundaries of Browns Park N.W.R. (as opposed to just inside that is,) there's some BLM withdrawal around the Reserve, I don't know if that means inside or outside and if outside how far it extends.. If you Google these places you can get the co-ords.. I'm guessing the peak. is approx 8 mi NE of the Reserve..

-----
 

" ...In 1871 and 1872, one of the greatest mining scams took place in the Wyoming Territory...More than a 100 years later, I panned 4 diamonds, 17 rubies and 24 pyrope garnets from the location: all 1872 salt... "


Diamond Peak is a prominent mountain summit in the Green River Basin of the U.S. state of Colorado. The 9,665-foot (2,946 m) peak is located 51.0 miles (82.1 km) northwest by west (bearing 306°) of the community of Maybell in Moffat County, Colorado, United States.
Diamond Peak was the scene of a diamond salting scheme known as the Diamond hoax of 1872. It was solved by Clarence King, the noted geologist and surveyor.
There are two other "Diamond Peaks" in Colorado, one in Routt County and the other in Jackson County.
-----

If anyone saddles up n gits, pls keep us'uns posted :4chsmu1:

Swamp

Edited by Swampstomper Al

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...