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PurpleCharm

Clear lavender rock found? Not waxy. Not glass!

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It looks like a diamond still forming. Like it's a soft diamond. I know that sounds crazy. I swear the host rock is kimberlite. I'm going to get the host rock checked locally. Did I mention there were trigons when I looked under high magnification? It's really a strange rock. The rainbows fan out in the broken area on the host rock. They fan out from one direction throughout, like a rainbow stair step with perfectly conchoidial spheres.

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2 hours ago, d_day said:

But if his hardness tests are accurate, that rules out opal, which is why I mentioned agate.

I understand, but... If the hardness tests were accurate it would not fracture like that. It is much softer than estimated.

I have knapped jaspers, agates, opals and glass. From working with these materials I can just about differentiate them by the shape of the flakes. Long thin flakes (like this ) mean softer material with bending ability. Short, steeply tapered flakes mean harder, more brittle material. RIppled detatchment surfaces mean softer, more bending material. Simple convex fractures indicate a stiffer, harder material. Lots of "rainbows" indicate thin, shallow fractures that are almost impossible in harder materials like agate and the rule in softer materials like opal and glass.

My money is still on opal. :idunno:

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Looks like Record Keeper quartz contains trigons too. 

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Adding more, in case someone is following this post. I believe the host rock is Lamproite Tuff, which would match with where it was found.

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1 hour ago, PurpleCharm said:

Adding more, in case someone is following this post. I believe the host rock is Lamproite Tuff, which would match with where it was found.

Wyoming?

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Maybe a local jeweler with geology education could help you out? 

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I tried the local jeweler. They are clueless. I think it's aluminous spinel based on hours of reading research papers from the 80's. The host rock exhibits all the properties of Lamproite and after reading how spinel, in theory, is created, it matches the hardness and the attributes. Spinel is commonly mistaken for glass. The color that formed matches the existing phlogopite found in the host rock, among other mica type phenocrysts. The area it was found matches cataclysmic activity from the past where plasma like bursts were seen in 1811 and the air was electrostatic. It takes 800C to create spinel with trioctohedral mica biotite.

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Here is a link, supposed to be a mineral show... I think this is your area.

https://showmerockhounds.com/kc-show/

 

 

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This page lists rock clubs, mineral societies in the state, I think one had FB page also. Seems like somebody could know what it is.

https://showmerockhounds.com/kansas-city-rock-clubs/

 

 

Edited by Red_desert

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Cataclysmic activity with plasma bursts and electrostatic air are the perfect environment to form common opal. :inocent:

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I`m starting to question this whole thread altogether.  The sample you posted does not match the host stone you provided pictures of....... 

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We only have a picture to guess what you present here. Going on the visuals and what you have told us about you tests your "rock" looks very much like the residue from a house fire. The layering of the melted debris and the purple tinted glass are defining characteristics of  house fire debris. The grid pattern on the back of the base "rock" is familiar. I've seen virtually identical debris from the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.

All things being equal I'll have to go with fire debris before I buy into "cataclysmic activity with plasma bursts and electrostatic air" in 1811 in what would 50 years later become Kansas  - unless that's how they described house fires in 1811. Occams razor - the simplest answer is most often the correct answer.

Spinel? Really?

If you are working the area south of Woodson the OFR Geographic report on those deposits would be a good place to start any research for what you might find there. You won't find any spinel or opal in those drill reports but you will find coal and highly decomposed lampriolite being mined for agriculture. Coal could be described as a "soft diamond" by some readers.

Edited by clay

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1 hour ago, clay said:

We only have a picture to guess what you present here. Going on the visuals and what you have told us about you tests your "rock" looks very much like the residue from a house fire. The layering of the melted debris and the purple tinted glass are defining characteristics of  house fire debris. The grid pattern on the back of the base "rock" is familiar. I've seen virtually identical debris from the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.

All things being equal I'll have to go with fire debris before I buy into "cataclysmic activity with plasma bursts and electrostatic air" in 1811 in what would 50 years later become Kansas  - unless that's how they described house fires in 1811. Occams razor - the simplest answer is most often the correct answer.

Spinel? Really?

If you are working the area south of Woodson the OFR Geographic report on those deposits would be a good place to start any research for what you might find there. You won't find any spinel or opal in those drill reports but you will find coal and highly decomposed lampriolite being mined for agriculture. Coal could be described as a "soft diamond" by some readers.

Look on the bright side Clay. At least it isn't fossilized aboriginal art burri burri stones with lights in the trees wanting to kill you. 

So chin up lil' buddy! Spring will be here soon and we can hunt for soft diamonds at Kilbourne hole under the shade of the carved Spanish poodles. I hear a meteorite caused a brush fire out there and cleared a bunch of new ground. The soft diamonds are so magnetic that you just swing a horseshoe around and they pop up through the sand like melon sprouts. We will hire undocumented Spanish masons to mine them for us and spend the rest of our days choking the chorizo and smoking the kimberlite pipe. 

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Boy, this groups sees "opal" everywhere they look.  LOL.  Hardness of 6-6.5, conchoidal fractures, purple color all that cries out as Amethyst Quartz. 

All opals have water in the chemical composition.  By definition the water content is what makes an opal, otherwise its just another piece of quartz.  Two test can be performed to ID this sample as an opal:  1) place sample under a shortwave, UV light, if it glows dim or bright green its an opal; or 2) (need to know to perform this test properly) crush a small sample of the mineral and place in a "closed tube" then heat with a Bunsen burner, if water condenses in the upper (cooler) port of the tube then you have IDed the sample as an opal.

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