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PurpleCharm

Clear lavender rock found? Not waxy. Not glass!

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Hello everyone! I'm new to this forum. I found a rock a while ago in the midwest river area known for flooding. It was attached to another rock then I broke it off. What is pictured is the rock part still attached to the other rock. Also a shard and its features and the main large rock. It has conchoidal fracture and mica like cleavage. Though it also seems to have 90 degree cleavage.  It is 6.5 on the mohs scale. It is harder than amazonite not as hard as citrine.  It is not waxy at all. It is very iridescent with rainbows on every level. Shiny and clear in areas. It is lavender in color throughout.  Any ideas??? Thank you!

Profile shard.JPG

Profile rock.JPG

top view of rock.JPG

side view of rock.JPG

top view of shard.JPG

top of large rock.JPG

top of large rock 2.JPG

bottom side of stone that was attached to host rock.JPG

host rock moistened.JPG

View 2 of host rock.JPG

Edited by PurpleCharm
added another pic

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Really? Interesting. I think this rock is too clear to be opal even though there are rainbows. There is no milky part unless it is the smashed areas.

Thank you for the reply!

Edited by PurpleCharm
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I have a very similar specimen. It is bright purple translucent common opal.

DSCN0577.JPG

 

It looks like it is in a very similar host rock too. A basalt. The perfect environment to find opal.

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I could see what you're saying. Though my stone is very clear. The pictures I took aren't so good. I'll try to take better pics. Also, the host rock is flat. The main stone is all one piece and not a conglomerate mass with the host rock. The main rock is cubed on the corners.

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Your pictures aren't that great but I wonder if it's flourite. Where in the Midwest are you located?

Edited by Morlock

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I just added another pic that shows the bottom of the stone where it was attached to the host rock. I'm in Kansas City, Missouri. If you know about the mud floods here, it could have come from the north or the south depending on the flow of the river when the New Madrid Fault went off. 

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It could be lilac colored quartz.

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Am I seeing air bubbles?

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4 minutes ago, clay said:

Am I seeing air bubbles?

That depends. Are you under water? :rolleyes:

It certainly does not have the crystal habit of quartz nor fluorite. If those are bubbles it is glass. They sure could be I suppose. It could be art glass stuck to a ceramic surface?

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No bubbles, what looks like bubbles are the indentations/outcropping of the aggregate in the host rock removed. Those are on the bottom. The stone is harder than glass and it does not hold hot breath or fog. I'll post another pick of the host rock.

Edited by PurpleCharm

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I tried to edit my post regarding the hardness. It's not 6.5, it's harder than glass. I thought glass was a 5 on the scale but it's showing a 7 which I thought was the hardness of quartz. Either way, it's harder than glass and as hard as citrine.

Edited by PurpleCharm

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15 minutes ago, PurpleCharm said:

I tried to edit my post regarding the hardness. It's not 6.5, it's harder than glass. I thought glass was a 5 on the scale but it's showing a 7 which I thought was the hardness of quartz. Either way, it's harder than glass and not as hard as citrine.

Citrine is a variety of quartz.

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Sorry,  I corrected my post. It's harder than citrine, I believe, due to the white streak it leaves on the surface of the lavender rock and does not scratch it.

Edited by PurpleCharm
typos

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I noticed the pics I took have made the rock appear as if it has bubbles. The book I set it on made that strange appearance through the rock. Oh well. I'll take this down and probably start over with good pics.

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Could be agate. 

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4 hours ago, PurpleCharm said:

I'm in Kansas City, Missouri. If you know about the mud floods here, it could have come from the north or the south depending on the flow of the river when the New Madrid Fault went off. 

This is a long shot, you're probably way too far from there. I found stones at the Crater of Diamonds park in Arkansas, amethyst colored and had them checked by the park geologist. Found near the amethyst bed also, which is now mostly hunted out. These turned out to be a type of jasper with a purple tinted inside, A whitish coating on the outside and stones were not pitted like some jasper. They seemed more like agate but geologist thought jasper was right.

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I also dissected the host rock which really looks like kimberlite. I found what looks like a phlogopite phenocryst and broke it open. It's flaky to my fingernail like mica and it is also iridescent on the inside. It's yellowish on the inside with an orange-brown outside.

Edited by PurpleCharm
redundancy

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Hi, I’m a newbie and just a rock, mineral enthusiast. So take what I think it looks like with utter caution. To me it looks like an opalized petrified wood. From the pic I see texture bark like. The lavender part totally opalescent.

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7 hours ago, Birdbrain59 said:

Hi, I’m a newbie and just a rock, mineral enthusiast. So take what I think it looks like with utter caution. To me it looks like an opalized petrified wood. From the pic I see texture bark like. The lavender part totally opalescent.

Birdbrain!

Here is my two cents.

I am pretty sure it is opal, but it is vein opal formed in volcanic rock. From an organic rich solution rather than silica replacement like a petrified organic like wood or bone.

It is laying on a host rock and that is the dead  giveaway. Petrified wood is not formed in rock like that. 

 

 

20 hours ago, PurpleCharm said:

Really? Interesting. I think this rock is too clear to be opal even though there are rainbows. There is no milky part unless it is the smashed areas.

Thank you for the reply!

 

 

PurpleCharm,

My money is still on common opal. It looks just like common opal and is on a volcanic just like common opal. I suppose it could be some variety of feldspar. 

Opal can be as clear as glass. Any "rainbows" would be caused by fractures and not opalescence. Common opal rarely displays opalescence. It often has prismatic refraction from fractures in transparent material.

It fractures just like glass. That is what I am seeing. Not a tougher material like agate or jasper. Not a strongly geometric crystal habit like fluorite but completely amorphous. You can see by the long conchoidal fractures that the material is very near glass in bending and toughness. There are very few minerals that would fracture like that.

Opal and a few feldspars would be the only common minerals that it could be IMHO. The matrix, the appearance, the fracture all scream common opal to me. 

But that is just my completely ignorant opinion based only on my ability to Google and BS. I have no real experience with rocks at all and I'm just posing as a prospector and rockhound. So take everything I say with caution. I could be just making stuff up.

 

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13 hours ago, PurpleCharm said:

I also dissected the host rock which really looks like kimberlite. I found what looks like a phlogopite phenocryst and broke it open. It's flaky to my fingernail like mica and it is also iridescent on the inside. It's yellowish on the inside with an orange-brown outside.

Looks like feldspar inclusions in the gas bubbles of a volcanic. A very common situation. Exactly the environment for opal to be formed. Glassy feldspars as well. 

Yeah, it does look like kimberlite. Intrusive volcanic necks often host sweet stuff like moonstone and bytownite both in gas bubbles and running veins. Sometimes a big pegmatite body will form and large crystals will be formed. It looks similar to the material my opal specimen is on. Full of vesicles popping out little sandine and albite crystals that sparkle with blue schiller.

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Sunstone? ( feldspar)

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On ‎2‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 8:38 PM, PurpleCharm said:

I also dissected the host rock which really looks like kimberlite. I found what looks like a phlogopite phenocryst and broke it open. It's flaky to my fingernail like mica and it is also iridescent on the inside. It's yellowish on the inside with an orange-brown outside.

Your thread title said "clear" so the agate like jaspers with the purple centers were more translucent than normal jasper, but I don't think clear applies here. However, I found all of them along shallow diamond pipe which enters the mine field only one spot (according to park geologist). The diamond ore there is lamproite and about 3-4 feet down runs over to Canary hill. They hit it sometimes when doing the furrows breaking off little chunks.

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10 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Looks like feldspar inclusions in the gas bubbles of a volcanic. A very common situation. Exactly the environment for opal to be formed. Glassy feldspars as well. 

Yeah, it does look like kimberlite. Intrusive volcanic necks often host sweet stuff like moonstone and bytownite both in gas bubbles and running veins. Sometimes a big pegmatite body will form and large crystals will be formed. It looks similar to the material my opal specimen is on. Full of vesicles popping out little sandine and albite crystals that sparkle with blue schiller.

But if his hardness tests are accurate, that rules out opal, which is why I mentioned agate.

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