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Trailertrash

Snakes and headphones

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Any tips for avoiding the buzzworms, while wearing headphones? I'm already wearing my snake gaiters, and obviously I keep my eyes open. It would be a bad day to get tagged by any rattler, but the Mojave Green around here would top my list of things to avoid.

I used to carry a round of 9mm birdshot in chamber of my pistol, but I'm skeptical of how useful that actually would be. 

The Gold Monster is ok without headphones, but not so much the Equinox, especially if there is any wind.

Any input is welcome...

Regards, Kyle

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Kyle;

I wear earbuds-Sony mdr-j10....I can hear everything and the detector...but, aside from being careful where I walk and where I reach there isn't much to be done.

I don't bother with guns, if you have time to shoot then you have time to back away. Let them live!

fred

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I agree with Fred ... No real reason to shoot the snakes. I have seen a few while nugget shooting with my headphones on. Never been chased by one ... Mohaves are aggressive but never had one chase me. If you are paying attention to your coil you or at least I will see the snake before damage is done. You are smart to wear the gators at all times if only to prevent an attack from the cactus!

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1 hour ago, fredmason said:

Kyle;

I wear earbuds-Sony mdr-j10....I can hear everything and the detector...but, aside from being careful where I walk and where I reach there isn't much to be done.

I don't bother with guns, if you have time to shoot then you have time to back away. Let them live!

fred

Thanks Fred, I'll try the earbud idea, hadn't thought of that. I gave up on the birdshot idea. I agree, that in the time it takes to shoot, there are better things to be doing. Kinda like the horn in a vehicle. 

The 124+P's are reserved for two legged meth-head types:)

Regards, Kyle

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6 minutes ago, Mike Furness said:

I agree with Fred ... No real reason to shoot the snakes. I have seen a few while nugget shooting with my headphones on. Never been chased by one ... Mohaves are aggressive but never had one chase me. If you are paying attention to your coil you or at least I will see the snake before damage is done. You are smart to wear the gators at all times if only to prevent an attack from the cactus!

Thanks, Mike

Good to know that you haven't had trouble with them. I actually like snakes, and they don't bother me at all. Unless, of course, they are gnawing on me. Got struck by a bull snake in Wa. State last year. I don't know if I stepped on his tail, or what. That was a heart stopper for a second, and the only time I've ever heard of that happening.

Now, if you want to see a grown man do the pee-pee dance, just let a scorpion run across my boot. I'm told that makes for a good show...

Regards,

Kyle

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For every one you see in the field, there's probably 5 that you don't. Stay safe...

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Hi, Kyle.  As most agree, no reason to shoot them unless  others are in the area.  I do carry a small 9mm on my side .. but more for rabid animals and my peace of mind.

I hunt a lot overnight, when the rattlers are supposed to be most active.  At night, I rarely wear headphones.  I can hear the snakes fine through my black widow headphones, though.  I just want a split second extra to hear a person or that mountain lion sneaking up from behind me.

On that subject, since you are considering snake safety, let me point out a couple things extra ...

The most dangerous time for me is if I am climbing up out of a wash.  This could put the snake higher than my gators.  Reaching up and putting your hand on a rock or boulder could get you into trouble. I had a friend bitten this ways.   Secondly, take an extra few seconds to check the bushes before getting down to dig.  My first year detecting, I was digging this hole for trash.  It was a deep hole and when I was done, I was a little winded.  I am still on my knees and just sit back on my hips and look at the bush right next to the hole I was digging.  There was the ring tail of a rattlesnake leaving.  Apparently, he was disappointed I didn't get any gold, too.  It was scary to think I could have leaned over and put my arm in that bush.   The snake never rattled.  Headphones would not have made a difference.

But realize, most of the time, they rattle on the second person and don't want anything to do with you anyways.  This was proven to me over and over again in my wildfire fighting days with the forest service.  Now, I guarantee I walk over them all night long.   But they leave me be.

 

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I use ear buds as well, Bose.

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2 hours ago, Andyy said:

Hi, Kyle.  As most agree, no reason to shoot them unless  others are in the area.  I do carry a small 9mm on my side .. but more for rabid animals and my peace of mind.

I hunt a lot overnight, when the rattlers are supposed to be most active.  At night, I rarely wear headphones.  I can hear the snakes fine through my black widow headphones, though.  I just want a split second extra to hear a person or that mountain lion sneaking up from behind me.

On that subject, since you are considering snake safety, let me point out a couple things extra ...

The most dangerous time for me is if I am climbing up out of a wash.  This could put the snake higher than my gators.  Reaching up and putting your hand on a rock or boulder could get you into trouble. I had a friend bitten this ways.   Secondly, take an extra few seconds to check the bushes before getting down to dig.  My first year detecting, I was digging this hole for trash.  It was a deep hole and when I was done, I was a little winded.  I am still on my knees and just sit back on my hips and look at the bush right next to the hole I was digging.  There was the ring tail of a rattlesnake leaving.  Apparently, he was disappointed I didn't get any gold, too.  It was scary to think I could have leaned over and put my arm in that bush.   The snake never rattled.  Headphones would not have made a difference.

But realize, most of the time, they rattle on the second person and don't want anything to do with you anyways.  This was proven to me over and over again in my wildfire fighting days with the forest service.  Now, I guarantee I walk over them all night long.   But they leave me be.

 

Thanks, Andy

What you mentioned about climbing out of a wash, and the bushes, are my two biggest concerns. I've looked at snake proof chaps, but most still only offer bite protection up to the knees, and the $ start to climb fast.

I'll keep doing what I'm doing, and hopefully the snakes want no part of me.

I only worry about the one snake that missed the last meeting, and thinks for himself :)

Regards, Kyle

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I use headphones and keep one ear uncovered.  My son went with me when he was younger and one snapped at him when using headphones on both ears and he has never gone out detecting with me since.  I know someone that used a self loaded pistol snake shot to get one under his trailer, but other than that, don't think they need to be shot.

I've seen one ?asleep? coiled up next to where I'd been cleaning brush for my truck one cold morning on the claim.  So happy that it was not a warm day.  I did not have my gaiters but wear them all the time now.  The gaiters are very effective at preventing cactus needles from penetrating.

After seeing where they hide, I avoid stepping in the brushy weeds when moving place to place.  When detecting, I take my time and look.

I have two sets of the knee length gaiters from Cabela.  They do not have foot protection, just ankle to knee, so mine need to be worn with an all leather boot.

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I use headphones...had no problem hearing the rattle 10 feet away. But > i also wear snake guards year round just in case. 

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12 hours ago, Trailertrash said:

Thanks, Andy

What you mentioned about climbing out of a wash, and the bushes, are my two biggest concerns. I've looked at snake proof chaps, but most still only offer bite protection up to the knees, and the $ start to climb fast.

I'll keep doing what I'm doing, and hopefully the snakes want no part of me.

I only worry about the one snake that missed the last meeting, and thinks for himself :)

Regards, Kyle

I have a new set of gators I'll sell cheap, they go to the hip and attach to your belt. I'll ad a pic later.

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17 hours ago, Trailertrash said:

I only worry about the one snake that missed the last meeting, and thinks for himself :)

That would be more likely the two legged variety!:old:

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27 minutes ago, Mike Furness said:

That would be more likely the two legged variety!:old:

Sad, but true, Mike. I have had more run-ins over the years with bad humans, than bad animals.

Kyle

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5 hours ago, Edge said:

I have a new set of gators I'll sell cheap, they go to the hip and attach to your belt. I'll ad a pic later.

Edge, ol' buddy, they're talking about gaiters not chaps! :)

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10 minutes ago, BMc said:

Edge, ol' buddy, they're talking about gaiters not chaps! :)

Thanks, they'd make awesome chaps too. Been a few times I Wished I was wearing them.

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Along with paying attention while climbing up. Look up in bushes and trees. Had a friend go face to face with one that was in a bush next to the wash he was working in.

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2 hours ago, azsearch said:

Along with paying attention while climbing up. Look up in bushes and trees. Had a friend go face to face with one that was in a bush next to the wash he was working in.

That's not a great visual! I'll add that to my list of things to keep an eye on. Did not know Rattlers climbed trees. 

Kyle

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Has anyone seen any out yet this year? It's to cold yet isn't it?

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Have any of you ever noticed that Horned Toads and Lizards the slower less troublesome reptilian creatures react to your metal detector as if they can hear it? 

I believe that I avoid contact with Rattlesnakes ( I have never seen one detecting) by just swinging the coil. The electromagnetic pulse produced by the machine notifies them that they need to vacate. The exception to this rule is the colder months when they are slow to react. However, the danger is far less when it's colder. 

Just sayin

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3 hours ago, azsearch said:

Along with paying attention while climbing up. Look up in bushes and trees. Had a friend go face to face with one that was in a bush next to the wash he was working in.

True.  I almost sawed one in half that was laid out across a branch.  Rare.. but you always get those adventurous ones.... kinda like us prospectors.  Lol

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50 minutes ago, fishing8046 said:

Have any of you ever noticed that Horned Toads and Lizards the slower less troublesome reptilian creatures react to your metal detector as if they can hear it? 

I believe that I avoid contact with Rattlesnakes ( I have never seen one detecting) by just swinging the coil. The electromagnetic pulse produced by the machine notifies them that they need to vacate. The exception to this rule is the colder months when they are slow to react. However, the danger is far less when it's colder. 

Just sayin

That is true,...and as an experience, I am thankful for that fact;......I was down running some concentrates down around Greaterville about 15 years ago years on a winters day (it was cold, windy, overcast and just not that much fun being out).  I had just set up my recirculating sluice up on a ridge about 12 ft above the wash and had brought my tools and a five gallon bucket down 3 to 4 ft below it on a rock ledge.  Encountering a rattlesnake was the farthest thing on my mind considering how cold it was out.  So I kneeled down and worked some of the material out of the bank; filled the bucket, and took it up on the ridge to run it thru the recirculating system.  After running the material, back down on the ledge I scampered.  I had just got myself comfortable kneeling on my knees and started poking at the bank material to loosen it.  When I had gotten some loosed I went to adjust the bucket on my right side so that I could shovel into it.  It was then that I caught a "glimpse" of something small and circular that caught my eye laying right next to my right boot.  Upon looking closer at this object I was shocked to realize that it was a black-colored rattlesnake ( a small one -about a foot lone) that was laying there coiled up right next to ( within about an inch) my foot.  It's head was pointing right towards my right leg.  I instantly jumped back as a reaction, and almost fell off of the ledge.  When I regained my composure I went back up and saw that it hadn't moved,... what I also realized was that it had been there when I initially kneeled down on the ledge the first time,..so, It could have tagged me during the time when I filled the first bucket, or when I came back down to fill the second one.  I really don't know how I kept from stepping on it either time????  The snake was obviously too cold to move, as it was very stiff and sluggish when I picked it up.   I took a couple of sticks and wedged up underneath it and carefully place it into a large mason jar that I had, and put the lid on real good,...........it was "show-n-tell" time.  I took it home to show my wife and she almost freeked-out ( it had warmed up and was very active).  Then the next day I took it into work to show my boss.....I said: "look what I found yesterday", as I slid the snake-filled jar across his empty desk to see what kind of reaction I would get.  He jumped back and almost had a heart attack .  I never could convince him go out into the hills with me after that ( funny how that happens).  I kept the rattler in that jar until the next weekend and took it back out where I had found it and let it go in a ledge that went deeper into the mountain.  Yep, there out there even in colder months. 

I walked up "behind" this one down in the lower desert last November.  It had curled up in a small hole and was just laying there asleep!!!!!  I went on up the wash for about an hour or so detecting, came back, and it was still there, So I took these photos of it, and just let it sleep.  Gary      

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S6.JPG

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1 hour ago, LowPoint said:

That is true,...and as an experience, I am thankful for that fact;......I was down running some concentrates down around Greaterville about 15 years ago years on a winters day (it was cold, windy, overcast and just not that much fun being out).  I had just set up my recirculating sluice up on a ridge about 12 ft above the wash and had brought my tools and a five gallon bucket down 3 to 4 ft below it on a rock ledge.  Encountering a rattlesnake was the farthest thing on my mind considering how cold it was out.  So I kneeled down and worked some of the material out of the bank; filled the bucket, and took it up on the ridge to run it thru the recirculating system.  After running the material, back down on the ledge I scampered.  I had just got myself comfortable kneeling on my knees and started poking at the bank material to loosen it.  When I had gotten some loosed I went to adjust the bucket on my right side so that I could shovel into it.  It was then that I caught a "glimpse" of something small and circular that caught my eye laying right next to my right boot.  Upon looking closer at this object I was shocked to realize that it was a black-colored rattlesnake ( a small one -about a foot lone) that was laying there coiled up right next to ( within about an inch) my foot.  It's head was pointing right towards my right leg.  I instantly jumped back as a reaction, and almost fell off of the ledge.  When I regained my composure I went back up and saw that it hadn't moved,... what I also realized was that it had been there when I initially kneeled down on the ledge the first time,..so, It could have tagged me during the time when I filled the first bucket, or when I came back down to fill the second one.  I really don't know how I kept from stepping on it either time????  The snake was obviously too cold to move, as it was very stiff and sluggish when I picked it up.   I took a couple of sticks and wedged up underneath it and carefully place it into a large mason jar that I had, and put the lid on real good,...........it was "show-n-tell" time.  I took it home to show my wife and she almost freeked-out ( it had warmed up and was very active).  Then the next day I took it into work to show my boss.....I said: "look what I found yesterday", as I slid the snake-filled jar across his empty desk to see what kind of reaction I would get.  He jumped back and almost had a heart attack .  I never could convince him go out into the hills with me after that ( funny how that happens).  I kept the rattler in that jar until the next weekend and took it back out where I had found it and let it go in a ledge that went deeper into the mountain.  Yep, there out there even in colder months. 

I walked up "behind" this one down in the lower desert last November.  It had curled up in a small hole and was just laying there asleep!!!!!  I went on up the wash for about an hour or so detecting, came back, and it was still there, So I took these photos of it, and just let it sleep.  Gary      

S1.JPG

S1a.JPG

s2.JPG

S4.JPG

S5.JPG

S6.JPG

Asleep? Im thinking he didn't have his eyes closed

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When I was ranching at 7000' in Utah, I went out one winter day to throw hay at some horses. 

I noticed black filly had puncture wounds on an ankle with blood dripping out..

 

I grabbed a shotgun and walked up the trail the horses had just walked in on and there was a rattler coiled up. Was about 40'F out and a couple inches of snow on the ground.

Edited by Edge
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