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Tick Diseases Getting Worse


Dakota Slim

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Take it from the CDC. Be careful out there...

Tickborne Diseases of the United States

  • Anaplasmosis is transmitted to humans by tick bites primarily from the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.
  • Babesiosis is caused by microscopic parasites that infect red blood cells. Most human cases of babesiosis in the U.S. are caused by Babesia microti. Babesia microti is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and is found primarily in the northeast and upper midwest.
  • Borrelia mayonii infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the upper midwestern United States. It has been found in blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Borrelia mayonii is a new species and is the only species besides B. burgdorferi known to cause Lyme disease in North America.
  • Borrelia miyamotoi infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the U.S. It is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and has a range similar to that of Lyme disease.
  • Bourbon virus infection has been identified in a limited number patients in the Midwest and southern United States. At this time, we do not know if the virus might be found in other areas of the United States.
  • Colorado tick fever is caused by a virus transmitted by the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni). It occurs in the the Rocky Mountain states at elevations of 4,000 to 10,500 feet.
  • Ehrlichiosis is transmitted to humans by the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found primarily in the southcentral and eastern U.S.
  • Heartland virus cases have been identified in the Midwestern and southern United States. Studies suggest that Lone Star ticks can transmit the virus. It is unknown if the virus may be found in other areas of the U.S.
  • Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern U.S. and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.
  • Powassan disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the groundhog tick (Ixodes cookei). Cases have been reported primarily from northeastern states and the Great Lakes region.
  • Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis is transmitted to humans by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum).
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is transmitted by the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sangunineus) in the U.S. The brown dog tick and other tick species are associated with RMSF in Central and South America.
  • STARI (Southern tick-associated rash illness) is transmitted via bites from the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found in the southeastern and eastern U.S.
  • Tickborne relapsing fever (TBRF) is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected soft ticks. TBRF has been reported in 15 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming and is associated with sleeping in rustic cabins and vacation homes.
  • Tularemia is transmitted to humans by the dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Tularemia occurs throughout the U.S.
  • 364D rickettsiosis (Rickettsia phillipi, proposed) is transmitted to humans by the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis ticks). This is a new disease that has been found in California.

https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/diseases/index.html

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2 hours ago, Hoser John said:

wonderful-just wonderful. They better like burned forest as toast is all we have left here-John

I pulled hundreds of ticks off my clothes and body when I was younger. Most of them came from grassy areas.   

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2 hours ago, Morlock said:

I wonder if chiggers carry diseases?

The only disease I have heard that infected chiggers can transmit is Scrub Typhus, but you don't hear much about this disease other than in the south pacific areas so it seems to be rare in the USA if at all.

https://www.cdc.gov/typhus/scrub/index.html

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Impetigo (staph) is closely associated with chiggers. They don't give it to you but the bite site gets infected from scratching. A person with enough staph under the fingernails could easily die from chiggers just from scratching them. Same with fleas but probably double with chiggers.

Back in the old days staph killed a lot of people. It would start with impetigo on the skin and after it spread for a couple days it would go into the blood and kill the person quick. Before antibiotics it probably killed more people than pneumonia. And all it took was scratching a bunch of bug bites to spread it all over your body.

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I caught Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever 6 or 7 years ago. Tick bite in Wyoming. I knew I'd been bitten, so was watching for any symptoms. Four days after the bite, I woke up with a horrible headache. Doc gave me doxicyclene, and it cleared up, with no after effects, though I didn't feel good for another 3 weeks. But, when the symptoms first showed, I was weak as a sick cat. took all the will power I had to drive myself to the doctor. Now, I always treat my clothing with Permethrin when going into any area that has ticks. And, spray any bare skin with Picaridin. I DO NOT want a repeat of RMSF!

Jim

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On ‎11‎/‎24‎/‎2018 at 6:05 PM, Idaho Jim said:

I caught Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever 6 or 7 years ago. Tick bite in Wyoming. I knew I'd been bitten, so was watching for any symptoms. Four days after the bite, I woke up with a horrible headache. Doc gave me doxicyclene, and it cleared up, with no after effects, though I didn't feel good for another 3 weeks. But, when the symptoms first showed, I was weak as a sick cat. took all the will power I had to drive myself to the doctor. Now, I always treat my clothing with Permethrin when going into any area that has ticks. And, spray any bare skin with Picaridin. I DO NOT want a repeat of RMSF!

Jim

That's some creepy stuff Jim. I am glad you recovered and that you recognized the risk. You were on top of it from the time you got bit and that is awesome. No doubt that helped the situation a bunch.

Any disease you get from a blood sucking insect is going to be a big deal. I heard somewhere mosquitos killed more people than all other insects and animals combined. Chagas disease from those insidious kissing bugs is a big deal. Zika will cost bazillions of dollars to fight and another bazillion taking care of babies with problems. There are dozens of other insect borne diseases that are even worse.

And a bunch that are weirder.

Toxoplasmosis is a parasite that gets in your brain. You get it from cats. It changes the way you think much in the same way a drug does. It makes you like cats. It makes mice unafraid of cats. A large percentage of the population is affected.

Imagine that. A worm in our brain is affecting our behavior in favor of its host. A cross species conspiracy!

They are finding out we have lots of viruses and parasites in our brains. Many are spread through blood sucking insects. None are easily diagnosed and very few have a treatment. Some researchers believe that a lot of our mental problems and mental conditions may be caused by a parasite or virus. Much of our behavior could be controlled by tiny worms in our brain. No kidding.

Are we in control or are the worms? Or are the ticks and mosquitos the masterminds in all of this? Was a tiny grub in Hemingway's temporal lobe responsible for the 'Old Man in the Sea"? Is a strong de-wormer all that is needed to cure our political problems? Could a little insecticide keep us from being hateful bratwursts as we get older? It seems that it could be the case.

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I read that about toxoplasmosis, Bob scared the crap out of me....LOL I know I'm a victim. When younger, I hated cats. A few years later, I came to like them. Still have one, but it will probably be the last. Just cal me "wormboy"...Ha!

Jim

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8 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

That's some creepy stuff Jim. I am glad you recovered and that you recognized the risk. You were on top of it from the time you got bit and that is awesome. No doubt that helped the situation a bunch.

Any disease you get from a blood sucking insect is going to be a big deal. I heard somewhere mosquitos killed more people than all other insects and animals combined. Chagas disease from those insidious kissing bugs is a big deal. Zika will cost bazillions of dollars to fight and another bazillion taking care of babies with problems. There are dozens of other insect borne diseases that are even worse.

And a bunch that are weirder.

Toxoplasmosis is a parasite that gets in your brain. You get it from cats. It changes the way you think much in the same way a drug does. It makes you like cats. It makes mice unafraid of cats. A large percentage of the population is affected.

Imagine that. A worm in our brain is affecting our behavior in favor of its host. A cross species conspiracy!

They are finding out we have lots of viruses and parasites in our brains. Many are spread through blood sucking insects. None are easily diagnosed and very few have a treatment. Some researchers believe that a lot of our mental problems and mental conditions may be caused by a parasite or virus. Much of our behavior could be controlled by tiny worms in our brain. No kidding.

Are we in control or are the worms? Or are the ticks and mosquitos the masterminds in all of this? Was a tiny grub in Hemingway's temporal lobe responsible for the 'Old Man in the Sea"? Is a strong de-wormer all that is needed to cure our political problems? Could a little insecticide keep us from being hateful bratwursts as we get older? It seems that it could be the case.

Well that explains alot about how a bunch of us behave on this forum!!! :snapoutofit:

It also explains many issues with interaction among humans in this day and time, actually since the begining of our time on this rock.....now where did I put that de-wormer medication??? :89:

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14 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

It makes you like cats.

Well, at least I know I don't have toxoplasmosis.  As for ticks and chiggers, I know they are here, but they're sure less populous than in wetter climates.  This week I've taken three lengthy walks in the desert, and not a single critter latched onto the dog or me.  In Misery, a repellant-free man was an exsanguinated man unless there was snow on the ground.

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7 hours ago, Saul R W said:

Well, at least I know I don't have toxoplasmosis.  As for ticks and chiggers, I know they are here, but they're sure less populous than in wetter climates.  This week I've taken three lengthy walks in the desert, and not a single critter latched onto the dog or me.  In Misery, a repellant-free man was an exsanguinated man unless there was snow on the ground.

Welcome back you well written rascal. This place is a tar pit without you.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
It is probably some smart little protozoan you got from eating kosher deli meat. Ever eat a cured cat?
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Yes, I'm just a ray of gilded sunshine, Bob.  I blind myself sometimes.  As for tar pits, I rode my old Honda 90 into one in Southern California in 1981 while escaping from a CHP officer who was attempting to out-cross-country me on his Goldwing sporting a 455 Olds big block, or whatever cow of a street bike he was riding.  My bike and I came through well oiled and shackle free.  I learned a valuable lesson that day, which I'll sell at the right price.  

And no, I haven't eaten cat, cured or otherwise (nor was I aware that there was a cure).  Cat with hechsher is a rarity, and too expensive for my budget.  Should I be wary of the meat in your world-famous chili?

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15 minutes ago, Saul R W said:

Yes, I'm just a ray of gilded sunshine, Bob.  I blind myself sometimes.  As for tar pits, I rode my old Honda 90 into one in Southern California in 1981 while escaping from a CHP officer who was attempting to out-cross-country me on his Goldwing sporting a 455 Olds big block, or whatever cow of a street bike he was riding.  My bike and I came through well oiled and shackle free.  I learned a valuable lesson that day, which I'll sell at the right price.  

And no, I haven't eaten cat, cured or otherwise (nor was I aware that there was a cure).  Cat with hechsher is a rarity, and too expensive for my budget.  Should I be wary of the meat in your world-famous chili?

We don't have chili here Saul. That is a Texan dish that you put on a chili dog. I don't think there is any cat in that chili but there may be in the dog. Go figure that one huh?

We only serve chile here which is not even similar to chili. And there is no cat involved. There are several different pig and cow parts that you don't want to think too hard about in some of those dishes. But chile is also available in a wide variety of dishes that have no meat at all. Meat is traditionally a delicacy and most New Mexican cuisine can be had with or without meat (but never without chile).

I must go and remove my head covering. The sun is now up and my natural glow is not so conspicuous. Have a great day my friend.

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Thanks for the welcome back, Bob.  Yes, the sun is up here, too, and I should go out and pretend to be productive, just in case anyone's watching.

Edited by Saul R W
No better way to get a rise out of a language purist (or a New Mexican) than to substitute chili for chile in a sentence (or a recipe). I wonder how many shots have been fired over the Rio Grandi over this issue?
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12 minutes ago, Saul R W said:

Thanks for the welcome back, Bob.  Yes, the sun is up here, too, and I should go out and pretend to be productive, just in case anyone's watching.

I don't know about shots fired across the Rio Grande because New Mexicans have both sides of it.

When you are in Apacheria chile is a red or green pod. Outside of Apacheria chili means some sort of concoction in a stew pot that makes you fart. We say and spell the word differently to make that distinction. 

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Didn't you guys try to change the river's course (in court briefings) in the early decades of the last century?  And lose the argument with your bigger, better-lawyered neighbor? 

Edited by Saul R W
Maybe Texas bribed the SC justices with chili cats.
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8 hours ago, Saul R W said:

Didn't you guys try to change the river's course (in court briefings) in the early decades of the last century?  And lose the argument with your bigger, better-lawyered neighbor? 

Its complicated. We built a dam and Texas freaked out. And there was a whole lot of legal maneuvers that influenced the way water was handled in the west. Then the wealthy agricultural lobby cornered any groundwater that was left.

Now the water flows from our mountians straight to Texas and we can't use it. And all the ground water is allocated for agriculture. So we have a huge flowing river and excellent underground aquifers but no water that we can legally drink. All the water in the river belongs to Texas and the nut farmers have pumped the aquifers so low our wells are going dry. So the Texans water their yards and wash their cars, the rich farmers grow pecans for the European elite and alfalfa for their roping horses. And the common New Mexicans drink salty mud from failing wells and wonder what tomorrow will bring.

The takeaway is we have lots of good water and Texas has none. So Texas took our water and now we fight over what is left. The rich men want to continue being rich on their huge pecan farms and the poor man wants a drink of water. It is a helluva situation. 

It is just one reason why tick diseases are getting worse.

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