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markyzmark

Thoughts? Answers are very appreciated

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A terrestrial rock of sorts. Very angular, gray in color not consistent with meteorites. In the field, I would have passed right on by this not giving it even a second look. If your hunting areas with this kind of consistency, meteorites would stick out as light-chocolate brown, as I call them “poop” brown in color. If it’s a fresh fall, then they will most likely have a black fusion crust but not always. Fresh is a relatively open term, meaning yesterday or even as long ago as 30+ years. 

 

Keep up the looking, hunting and studying. In theory, there should be 1 meteorite in 1 square mile of land on earth. But that’s a lot of ground to cover. If you can, search in areas where there have been meteorites found before, thus giving you a greater chance of finding one. 

 

Jason

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It was cleaned off, it is black (crust portions) with some dust on it making it look grey -- It is extremely magnetic and is blueish color "inside" 

I am wondering if it just a bad photo session -- but regardless, thank you and I think I may have a fully covered "poop" find I will post you shortly :D:D


The question is, what could account for a hunk of iron like this - or what else could --  I am well read on the subject and basically know all what to look for if that helps :D I also have a microscope to examine what I can (I dont have the ability to cut my own slices, yet:P)

The shape is similar enough to pieces of iron cores that have exploded/fragmented 


P.S.      The area has alot of eolothic stone implements littering the ground and is almost certainly an ancient habitation area 

Edited by markyzmark

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13 minutes ago, Jayray said:

A terrestrial rock of sorts. Very angular, gray in color not consistent with meteorites. In the field, I would have passed right on by this not giving it even a second look. If your hunting areas with this kind of consistency, meteorites would stick out as light-chocolate brown, as I call them “poop” brown in color. If it’s a fresh fall, then they will most likely have a black fusion crust but not always. Fresh is a relatively open term, meaning yesterday or even as long ago as 30+ years. 

 

Keep up the looking, hunting and studying. In theory, there should be 1 meteorite in 1 square mile of land on earth. But that’s a lot of ground to cover. If you can, search in areas where there have been meteorites found before, thus giving you a greater chance of finding one. 

 

Jason

In other words, you're looking for the unusual as opposed to whatever rocks you might normally see in the field.

Actually another meteorite expert stated there's 6 to 10 meteorites per square mile but they might be a small as a pea.

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I was using a meteorite stick, home-made  

and yes it is unusual :D:D  In fact its downright out of place :)
 

Edited by markyzmark

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Here are a few of my finds. As you can tell they are “different” from the surrounding rocks. Notice how they all have that somewhat typical color? If your finding Neolithic types of tools or ‘scraps’ in the area your hunting, those are IMO just as cool as meteorites. 

 

Jason

AC341E65-CEF9-427E-AFE4-FFAD4D3A6CC3.jpeg

29C8158B-09E9-49DB-B074-9D8DC959D00F.jpeg

71102167-EC21-498C-A53E-76957699F0F7.jpeg

ED730CA1-515E-4DCD-9A15-D24753A8A812.jpeg

1B9B8F15-F3CF-4952-94E3-572F160C8E13.jpeg

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ah yes I have some like those - Thank you for your contribution - It seems I've stumbled onto something extraordinary ! :D:D

Perhaps its bad of me but I often have used a wire brush to remove the browish dust and rust because I am trying to prevent further rusting. It is a wet area and the rust pockets can hold moisture and eat into the interior 

Edited by markyzmark

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The ones posted are all ordinary chondrites. L-4/L6. If ever in question, use a file, grinder, sand paper, etc. to show a window into the matrix. Here you can see the tiny make up, as viewer from a microscope that was cut. And the other pic is as found, where there isn’t a defined pattern per say. All but about 10-20% of my finds were made with a metal detector. A good rule of thumb is to hunt with the sun at your back and look for the odd ball color rocks if hunting on a dry lake bed, and if metal detecting spec all targets, sun at your back as well and have a ‘throw down’ to test the area. And also not to get discouraged. Matching the color also help train the brain to remember what to look for. 

 

Jason

74A6257F-3685-4140-B332-79C1C48B77D8.jpeg

936C4E51-EA6F-41C9-AEDA-7656977FD34B.jpeg

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Markzymark,

The stone has gas-like vestibules, sharp angular surfaces, a terrestrially weathered surface, surface inclusions the same as internal break surfaces, and a uniform molten appearance;. None, of which, are typical of meteorites. The stone completely lacks a meteoritic crust, no chrondrules observed, no visible metal flecks. It has the appearance and characteristics of a terrestrial iron rich stone lacking characteristics of a typical meteorite.

Read O Richard Norton's "Rocks from Space" and visit a meteorite-themed collection, such as; Arizona State University's 'Meteorite Center" or similar venue. You may want to purchase confirmed meteorites from reputable dealers for you collection and study.

Keep looking down. They're out there.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters

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It is an iron rich volcanic extrusive or slag. Check out the gas bubbles. Look at that pattern. Definitely not a meteorite. File a little window and prove it to yourself. Betcha it is sub metallic through and through.

Edited by Bedrock Bob

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17 hours ago, Jayray said:

Here are a few of my finds. As you can tell they are “different” from the surrounding rocks. Notice how they all have that somewhat typical color? If your finding Neolithic types of tools or ‘scraps’ in the area your hunting, those are IMO just as cool as meteorites. 

 

Jason

AC341E65-CEF9-427E-AFE4-FFAD4D3A6CC3.jpeg

29C8158B-09E9-49DB-B074-9D8DC959D00F.jpeg

71102167-EC21-498C-A53E-76957699F0F7.jpeg

ED730CA1-515E-4DCD-9A15-D24753A8A812.jpeg

1B9B8F15-F3CF-4952-94E3-572F160C8E13.jpeg

Good eye Jayray!

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vesicles in basaltic meteorites. vesicles only develop in rocks that cool from a liquid - an igneous rock.

most meteorites come from asteroids, and almost all asteroids are too small to have volcanoes, thru very few meteorites are igneous rocks.

mars has the larges volcanoes in our solar system.

would advise not to use a magnet, use compass instead. take pictures as they lay, with arrow pointing north. fun checking with a compass.

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2 hours ago, markyzmark said:

Confirmed btw 

What was confirmed, as what, by who?

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