Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

I think this should be moved to the meteorite category. You might get more useful responses....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes.......Nice point, how many magnetic poles does it have? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It only has one pole but it always points north no matter which way you turn the stone. :)

It started a fire in the bush where it hit. I am looking under other burned bushes in the area and I am finding more stones just like it. They all have poles that point to magnetic north no matter which way the stone is oriented. 

It has regmaglypts and a fusion crust so thin it is invisible. It is probably a chondrulaceous carbonite type 34C. No doubt there will be flecks of nickel iron when I file a window in it to see the fascinating matrix. 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

must have been under 2190 degrees, or it would have caliche fused to it.

nice find.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great find. Those long thin ones must be difficult to knap.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Great find. Those long thin ones must be difficult to knap.

 

I don't want to misrepresent anything here. I didn't find this point. I made it with a piece of sandstone and the tip of a deer antler.

They aren't that hard to make. Not that hard to break either. It takes about an hour or so to knap a point and at the end you either snap it in half or you have a sweet point. I hit about 50/50 average between success and failure.

I was feeling frisky so I made a serrated war point. They would dip these in all sorts of foul stuff and the notches would take it deep into the wound and break off in there. That way even a flesh wound was a kill shot. I have seen a few real ones and I wanted to see if I could duplicate it. Mine came out a bit Neanderthal but I like it a lot. I think it looks evil AF.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a great job knapping. I wanted to get into this years ago but never did. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And a knapper too?!?! GTFO, lol!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang nice work Bob ever do a video on this sort of work, would be cool to see....

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am afraid a video of me would be exactly as captivating as watching bacon fry. But thanks for the kind words.

Our buddy Paleoman Jim has a bunch of great knapping videos. That is where I learned the little bit that I know.

He has a video where he makes this awesome little delicate green glass point from a beer bottle bottom. That is where I learned the steps to make one. I start it with a copper percussion tool and finish them with a pressure flaker made out of a piece of hardened copper wire.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a few tools I made.

I like the "ishi stick" on the far left to do big pressure flaking. It has a piece of hardened copper in the end and a copper band around the handle to make it indestructable. You can take off really big flakes with it.

You see my hammerstone with some grooves to straighten glass, dull edges and sharpen the copper point. 

The classic pressure tool is a deer antler. They wear down sooner or later so I made a couple antlers with metal points. One has a hardened copper flaker and the other has a steel horseshoe nail for a notcher.

Then there are a couple of percussion tools and a couple of combination tools. They have a copper percussion tool on one end and a hardened copper wire to pressure flake on the other. Kinda like a pencil with a copper "lead". And a lead filled copper ball at the other end.

The combination tools are cool. You have a little percussion tool to start the shape and a pressure flaker to finish it all in one tool. You can pick up just about any old bottle and make a sweet point with this one tool.

The tools are made from copper fittings, copper electrical wire, lead and local hardwood. The percussion tool with the striped wood handle is knifeleaf wood. The two to the right of it is whitethorn acacia, and the ones on the far right and left are honey mesquite.

DSCN0435.JPG

Here is a nice green point that has a sweet shape. You can see some printing from the bottom of the bottle.

DSCN0437.JPG

And another goofy looking point I made just for the heck of it. I don't know what it is supposed to be but I kinda like the shape.

DSCN0439.JPG

  • Like 6
  • well done 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That bottom one would be good for shooting carp with.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nugget108 said:

That bottom one would be good for shooting carp with.

:) … It would sure wake one up huh?

That material is dacite so it is just a bit more durable than glass. Still, one shot is all you would get with a point like that. 

I make fishing points with one long tail that curves out for a barb. I have a bunch of them but I have never used one. I would break a dozen before I connected with a fish. I will post a photo of a glass fishing point I made tomorrow evening.

I use a regular fiberglass fishing arrow with an AMS point for frogs and fish (with a recurve bow). But I did fix a glass point on a carbon arrow (compound bow) for turkey. Never got a shot with it. I am almost glad. I would hate to chomp into a turkey breast and get a big flake of glass in my mouth. It would be a definite possibility.

I stick with glass, obsidian or dacite for my points. Common opal sometimes knaps easy too. But most cherts, jaspers and agates are tough as heck to knock flakes off of and will wreck your hands quickly. You have to be pretty good and know just how to hit that stuff to make a tool. They make better points though and would be fine for game.

Mine are more for show. Just something neat to make out of trash.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Here are a few tools I made.

I like the "ishi stick" on the far left to do big pressure flaking. It has a piece of hardened copper in the end and a copper band around the handle to make it indestructable. You can take off really big flakes with it.

You see my hammerstone with some grooves to straighten glass, dull edges and sharpen the copper point. 

The classic pressure tool is a deer antler. They wear down sooner or later so I made a couple antlers with metal points. One has a hardened copper flaker and the other has a steel horseshoe nail for a notcher.

Then there are a couple of percussion tools and a couple of combination tools. They have a copper percussion tool on one end and a hardened copper wire to pressure flake on the other. Kinda like a pencil with a copper "lead". And a lead filled copper ball at the other end.

The combination tools are cool. You have a little percussion tool to start the shape and a pressure flaker to finish it all in one tool. You can pick up just about any old bottle and make a sweet point with this one tool.

The tools are made from copper fittings, copper electrical wire, lead and local hardwood. The percussion tool with the striped wood handle is knifeleaf wood. The two to the right of it is whitethorn acacia, and the ones on the far right and left are honey mesquite.

DSCN0435.JPG

Here is a nice green point that has a sweet shape. You can see some printing from the bottom of the bottle.

DSCN0437.JPG

And another goofy looking point I made just for the heck of it. I don't know what it is supposed to be but I kinda like the shape.

DSCN0439.JPG

Pretty sure I can find a beer bottle around here somewhere...

Great stuff Bob. My bucket list includes taking a deer with a homemade bow, arrows and arrowheads.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Edge said:

Pretty sure I can find a beer bottle around here somewhere...

Great stuff Bob. My bucket list includes taking a deer with a homemade bow, arrows and arrowheads.

I am a wood carver and I make all sorts of stuff with local woods but I have never made a wooden bow. I have thought about it a lot. I am not sure I have the kind of time it takes to make a single piece bow the old fashioned way. I think I would make a recurve bow with an acacia brace and fiberglass backed tornillo limbs. That would make wood selection a lot easier as well as time invested into building. You could probably whip out a nice bow in a couple dozen hours.

I have made several PVC bows and those suckers are not toys. You could definitely fish or hunt any big game with one. I had a 70 lb pull longbow made out of 1" sched 40 pipe that would shoot 3/8 rebar shafts through two 7/16 sheets of OSB board!

They only take a couple hours to build and you can do a nice 30-50 lb recurve for under $10. All it takes is a heat gun. If you want to do it right you can build a jig out of a 2X6 and a couple bar clamps and make it perfect. Then crank out a few for your buddies because they are so cheap and cool.

A 5' section of PVC and a miniature Jaegermeister bottle will make a bow and 2 good points in less than a day. If a fellow can't get it done with that a fancy compound bow is probably not going to help much.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm and EXPERT Napper! I take atleast two everyday! Ha! Ha! Grubstake

  • Like 4
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 10/1/2018 at 6:32 AM, Bedrock Bob said:

DSCN0431.JPG

Lacks the arrow-dynamics, I would not have bothered picking it up. Did you find it in the parking lot of Bowlins Teepee?

Edited by Edge
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought these were meteorites, but the lab said not enough nickel content. They look like they were knapped, or worked by hand. So i figured ask you guys what you think about this iron matieral. The double pointed one looks like an ancient fishing hook called a gouge. The cresent shaped one with a notch looks like what is called great basin cresent. Made by people over 8,000 years ago, experts still can't agree what they were used for. I had found a lot of iron material that looks meteoritic, and when i found the pieces that looked worked at least hundreds of years ago i figured i might have found a strewnfeild. To bad the lab says no meteorite, and UNR does not think i have a great basin cresent because they weren't made of iron.:idunno:

IMG_4080.JPG

IMG_4091.JPG

IMG_4085.JPG

IMG_4077.JPG

IMG_4095.JPG

IMG_4098.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Top three: Old rusty iron/steel.  A washer and . . . ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, hardtimehermit said:

I thought these were meteorites, but the lab said not enough nickel content. They look like they were knapped, or worked by hand. So i figured ask you guys what you think about this iron matieral. The double pointed one looks like an ancient fishing hook called a gouge. The cresent shaped one with a notch looks like what is called great basin cresent. Made by people over 8,000 years ago, experts still can't agree what they were used for. I had found a lot of iron material that looks meteoritic, and when i found the pieces that looked worked at least hundreds of years ago i figured i might have found a strewnfeild. To bad the lab says no meteorite, and UNR does not think i have a great basin cresent because they weren't made of iron.:idunno:

IMG_4080.JPG

IMG_4091.JPG

IMG_4085.JPG

IMG_4077.JPG

IMG_4095.JPG

IMG_4098.JPG

Titillating trivia.

Top: brakeshoe of an 1857 Studebaker coupe, driver's side.

2nd from top: Viking commemorative pillaging pendant. Sited by many historians as proof Leif Erikson discovered Winnemucca.

3rd: Iron age coprolite, self explanatory.

4th: Boot of Zapata, often used during the Mexican Revolution to transport either explosives or Tapatio sauce.

 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

It was found on the banks of the Hatch River. :)

Wait, you risked your life scavenging along the banks of the mighty, merciless Hatch?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, hardtimehermit said:

 

 

 

IMG_4085.JPG

 

 

 

I have no clue about any of the other objects. They could be anything. So could this one. But I can give you an observation FWIW.

The hole was stamped in the blank because of the meniscus you see in the center. It was done by a punch and die. The lower right edge is a stressed edge and was probably broken off by bending or vibration. You can see that it is harder in that area (it resists scaling) and is raised as if twisted off. So this is not all of the object. It is a broken part.

On the other side are gouges. Knapping is working with the conchoidal fracture in a silica material. Those are gouges on metal from being hit, probably against the ground or rocks. You can see that side is worked over and it looks a lot like the wear on the underside of a vehicle. That is probably why the piece had been hardened and broke off.

So I would assume it was no older than the industrial revolution. Although it is round now the original shape was something else. And it was some type of part subject to bending or vibrational wear. It hit the ground on one side really hard a lot and the other side was against something and was protected.

The rest are algos brother. Formless rusted artifacts from who knows where. This one too but you can make some observations based on its appearance.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×