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GOLD MINE DISCOVERED! (The Hard Way!)


BMc

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PROSPECTING IN THE JACKSON MTS. OF NV: I drove up onto a dirt jeep trail which unbeknownst to me, had been severely eroded and undermined by water flow just beneath the surface. After I winched out of the collapsed mine, looking down into the hole I could see an old rickety wooden ladder leaning against a wall. I didn't find any gold at that exact spot, but detecting downstream, I dug several old expended .50 Cal brass casings and a partial belt of live ammo. Might have been a range for military exercises at one time, I suppose.   It was a good looking area which I planned to go back to, but the inevitable land grab prevented future prospecting opportunities.

The Jackson Mountains are located in Humboldt County, 56 miles west of Winnemucca, Nevada. Access can be reached from Winnemucca by taking the Jungo Road west for 35 miles to Bottle Creek Road. There are 2 Wilderness Protected areas in the Jackson Mts., North and South Wilderness, divided by Trout Creek Road. The photographs were taken before the Jackson Mts became a wilderness designated area.

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.50 CAL.JPG

Edited by BMc
typo
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Thanks for sharing your story and photos.  The photo of the .50 cal ammo clips seem to indicate a clip failure.  During WW2 Govt contractors at some point (I believe by 1942) were required to stamp all of their clips.  The spring metal that the clips are made of is very hard and difficult to stamp clearly.  But if you look closely with a magnifying glass after cleaning your clips best you can you should be able to distinguish the stamped markings.  The purpose of these markings was to enable Govt quality control inspectors to trace back to a manufacturer -- and even to a specific plant -- defective clips, i.e., usually clips that no longer met the tolerance standards required to perform military contract work.  This typically would happen when a particular manufacturing apparatus was used beyond its anticipated life or when it had not been calibrated for too long a time.  The result of a defective clip could be catastrophic for a fighter pilot, for example, whose guns jammed in the midst of a dog fight.  Just thought this little bit of WW2 memorabilia might be of interest.  I have a collection of .50 cal clips, casings and rounds.  My father, as an ammunition ordnance man aboard the USS Boxer during WW2, would have had the duty to make a report of such ordnance failures after examining the clips of a returning fighter plane whose guns jammed.

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1 hour ago, Micro Nugget said:

Thanks for sharing your story and photos.  The photo of the .50 cal ammo clips seem to indicate a clip failure.  During WW2 Govt contractors at some point (I believe by 1942) were required to stamp all of their clips.  The spring metal that the clips are made of is very hard and difficult to stamp clearly.  But if you look closely with a magnifying glass after cleaning your clips best you can you should be able to distinguish the stamped markings.  The purpose of these markings was to enable Govt quality control inspectors to trace back to a manufacturer -- and even to a specific plant -- defective clips, i.e., usually clips that no longer met the tolerance standards required to perform military contract work.  This typically would happen when a particular manufacturing apparatus was used beyond its anticipated life or when it had not been calibrated for too long a time.  The result of a defective clip could be catastrophic for a fighter pilot, for example, whose guns jammed in the midst of a dog fight.  Just thought this little bit of WW2 memorabilia might be of interest.  I have a collection of .50 cal clips, casings and rounds.  My father, as an ammunition ordnance man aboard the USS Boxer during WW2, would have had the duty to make a report of such ordnance failures after examining the clips of a returning fighter plane whose guns jammed.

Cool WW-2 and personal history connection Micro Nugget. That QC was critical, no doubt. That may have been what happened with the ones I found. They were in a wash with lots of trash so who knows. The rounds are headstamp marked LS 4. The LS is Lake City Arsenal, but they are corroded and rusted pretty bad and hard to see anything on the clips. I came to appreciate the A&E ships a lot more once I got to 'Nam and depended on the supply chain.  The ships always did their jobs I think. The Choppers, often had weather issues and couldn't fly at times during the monsoons due to low cloud cover. The .50 Cal MG was an awesome piece of hardware. We had to practice familiarization fire with the .50 no matter if we were assigned as MG'ers or not, just in case the Gunners got knocked out of the fight. They were fun to shoot but would vibrate the heck out of you if you didn't brace yourself good.

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