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COBRAY SIDE BY SIDE .45 LONG COLT/.410 2.5 INCH

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DOUBLE BARRELED SNAKE GUN:  I picked this up in a trade as a camp gun or a snake gun when I'm out in the brush and snaky rocky places. After shooting a couple of rounds, I quickly realized that the factory grips were inadequate to handle the recoil from either of these calibers. I know they make a custom plastic set of grips and a set of wooded grips for it, but I believe I will just keep the over sized "custom" Pachmayr rubber grips that I have on it now. It soaks up the recoil from both the .45 LC and the .410 just fine . . .

COBRAY .45 LC- 410.PNG

COBRAY-1.JPG

COBRAY-2.JPG

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I have shot one , ya sure got to have a grip on it. I have commanche that is 410 & .45 long , it shoots3 inch 410'sbut has a 10 inch barrel

 

Edited by azdigger

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From the photo, dam thing looks like its made from "cast" metal. 
 

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Yeah, but the snakes don't know that . . .  It reminds me of one of those types of matte finish, non-rust guns you might see thrown in a tackle box, or under the front seat of a jeep or an old pickup truck. Just  a handy close range point and shoot tool to have on hand at the lake or out in the sticks . . .

 

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This is my critter stopper

 

scp60000_supercomanche45-10in-satinnickle_1_right.jpg

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I like it! Reminds me of an H&R breakfront single shot .22 pistol I had as a kid. It made a darn good trap line gun. 

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I had one of those Cobrays, sold it, mine took two hands to take off safety and one the safety fell completely out 

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darn, you guys must have really big snakes lol.

 

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51 minutes ago, GeoJack said:

darn, you guys must have really big snakes lol.

 

SPRINGTIME RATTLER ROUNDUP: Took my nephews fishing at a drainage inlet on the river and ended up having to clean out the area before it was safe enough to fish. Snakes were everywhere, on the banks, in the bushes, in the rocks, 3 caught on fishing poles after being shot. 13 total for the week. Last two photos, my daughter bagged a bunny and a rattler who wanted it too. 

NEPHEWS.PNG

FISHING.PNG

RIVER.PNG

HEATH-SNAKE.PNG

RABBIT.PNG

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4 hours ago, Edge said:

I had one of those Cobrays, sold it, mine took two hands to take off safety and one the safety fell completely out 

Well that sucks! I traded my buddy an under the hood, hot water - outdoor shower unit for it, so his wife would go camping with him. LOL!  I've owned the old clunker for over 10 years and the only problem I've had with it was an ejector issue which a little selective grinding cured early on.

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Well I'm sure the rodents would thank you for that effort.

Edited by GeoJack

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G.Jack, I get the drift, but here's the reality. The snake dens, left unchecked in a multiple use area present a danger to humans and livestock alike. The rancher who has the BLM lease in this area has a problem with his cattle getting bitten by rattlers, which is not uncommon here locally. He asked us to help thin out the snakes which I would have done anyway for safety reasons, especially if young people are present. Most of the time the rattlesnakes in this area don't rattle, they just freeze, and due to their coloration and the vegetation etc., people tend to walk right up on them, and even step on them sometimes. Rodents (field mice) aren't a problem anywhere that I'm aware of, especially along the river and in the bosque (wooded areas). The snakes here live off of frogs, lizards, bird eggs and other snakes mostly. And there's always plenty of Rattlesnakes (and other snakes), left over to manage the remaining rodent population (ground squirrels, gophers, kangaroo rats etc.)

Most of the State of New Mexico is a rural environment. Even so rattle snakes are found in cities and towns, homes and businesses. I usually find 1 or 2 in my yard per year, and that seems to be typical for my rural neighborhood. My neighbor behind me, who is the Post Master/Mistress of Hatch, NM was bitten in her back yard last year, and my neighbor to the West of me was struck on the bottom of his shoe, after he jumped back, slipped and fell, trying to avoid a strike. The farmer/neighbor across the street who grows alfalfa hay, reports that he runs over several rattlers with his tractor when he cuts hay, about every  3 weeks during spring, summer, and early fall.  I talked to another neighbor last night who killed 2 rattlers on his front porch last month. The farmers tend to manage mice and snakes by keeping Barn Cats, that control both. I do catch and release (spay/neuter program), on feral cats in my neighborhood and they are very effective in this manner.

Hope that eases your concerns. Between the proliferation of snakes and the feline population in the area, rodents haven't presented a problem.

 

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17 hours ago, BMc said:

Well that sucks! I traded my buddy an under the hood, hot water - outdoor shower unit for it, so his wife would go camping with him. LOL!  I've owned the old clunker for over 10 years and the only problem I've had with it was an ejector issue which a little selective grinding cured early on.

I hated to sell it, looked badazz.

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Gangsta, remember? and don't forget Ghetto. LOL!

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16 hours ago, BMc said:

G.Jack, I get the drift, but here's the reality. The snake dens, left unchecked in a multiple use area present a danger to humans and livestock alike. The rancher who has the BLM lease in this area has a problem with his cattle getting bitten by rattlers, which is not uncommon here locally. He asked us to help thin out the snakes which I would have done anyway for safety reasons, especially if young people are present. Most of the time the rattlesnakes in this area don't rattle, they just freeze, and due to their coloration and the vegetation etc., people tend to walk right up on them, and even step on them sometimes. Rodents (field mice) aren't a problem anywhere that I'm aware of, especially along the river and in the bosque (wooded areas). The snakes here live off of frogs, lizards, bird eggs and other snakes mostly. And there's always plenty of Rattlesnakes (and other snakes), left over to manage the remaining rodent population (ground squirrels, gophers, kangaroo rats etc.)

Most of the State of New Mexico is a rural environment. Even so rattle snakes are found in cities and towns, homes and businesses. I usually find 1 or 2 in my yard per year, and that seems to be typical for my rural neighborhood. My neighbor behind me, who is the Post Master/Mistress of Hatch, NM was bitten in her back yard last year, and my neighbor to the West of me was struck on the bottom of his shoe, after he jumped back, slipped and fell, trying to avoid a strike. The farmer/neighbor across the street who grows alfalfa hay, reports that he runs over several rattlers with his tractor when he cuts hay, about every  3 weeks during spring, summer, and early fall.  I talked to another neighbor last night who killed 2 rattlers on his front porch last month. The farmers tend to manage mice and snakes by keeping Barn Cats, that control both. I do catch and release (spay/neuter program), on feral cats in my neighborhood and they are very effective in this manner.

Hope that eases your concerns. Between the proliferation of snakes and the feline population in the area, rodents haven't presented a problem.

 

Bmc, understood. I also live in a very rural area and have many rattlers on my property and I catch and release when I can but I have not ever come upon a den. Been around snakes all my life so not a big issue to catch one up and move it somewhere else. Obviously I don't like to see "round up" images of a bunch of dead snakes but it is what it is. I hear more about cows, dear, etc breaking legs from gopher holes around here. We've got three cats and keep the grass cut short under the oaks and that seems to keep them at bay somewhat from coming around the house. This one was resting behind me while I was working for over an hour before I saw it.

 

That being said, my wife and I are very cautious when in the desert where you can see them about every 10 steps. It will cost north of $10k for a single bite.

 

Edited by GeoJack

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Nice Job G.Jack,

You could sure keep busy over here, but you would have to travel a ways to get to a drop off point I'm afraid. I would hate to think I'd relocated one that bit someone later on. We don't do an actual organized "roundup" per se, like they do in Sweetwater, TX each year for example. They catch rattlesnakes and bring them in by the dozens, milk them for venom to make anti-venom, then process the meat and skin, for commercial use. The annual harvest doesn't seem to reduce the snake population, since they keep doing it every year.

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Desert where me lives sidewinders along with regular rattlesnakes.

Sidewinders are very dangerous, they either come at you or move away.

 

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ROBBER'S ROOST: Robbers Roost is a prominent rocky formation with an interesting history in Western outlaw lore.  I saw one sidewinder in my travels while in So. Calif. It was small and had the curved horns above it's eyes, and no rattles, but it was a pretty bright green (at night with flashlight) So I was wondering if that was a sidewinder or a Mojave Green rattlesnake that I saw on the trail winding through Robber's Roost that night. And, they say that sidewinders like to burrow up just under the sand where it's hard to see them? Not good.

 

ROBBER'S ROOST.PNG

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1974-78 lived in the lowest part of the Mojave desert called imperial gables, concrete cabin used for General Patton's communication's during desert training. Pass eleven years been homeless, living in smoke tree, love it. Have no interest in living any place else. Do come to Tucson to get the meteorites on the market, then will be back to smoke tree.

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1 hour ago, BMc said:

ROBBER'S ROOST: Robbers Roost is a prominent rocky formation with an interesting history in Western outlaw lore.  I saw one sidewinder in my travels while in So. Calif. It was small and had the curved horns above it's eyes, and no rattles, but it was a pretty bright green (at night with flashlight) So I was wondering if that was a sidewinder or a Mojave Green rattlesnake that I saw on the trail winding through Robber's Roost that night. And, they say that sidewinders like to burrow up just under the sand where it's hard to see them? Not good.

 

ROBBER'S ROOST.PNG

The Mohave Green Rattlesnake doesn't have "horns", as far as I know the Sidewinders are the only rattlesnake with "horns", the "horns" are enlarged supraocular scales and can fold down over the eyes when the snake is burrowing underground to protect the eyes.

They are not usually green in color but I guess could it appear to be at night under artifical light, there is a sub-species sidewinder called the Mohave Desert Sidewinder.

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Yeah. that was my understanding also, and my research didn't show any green sidewinders either. But it was definitely a sharp, bright green color and it did have the characteristic SW horns. I was able to put the flashlight pretty close to it and, the adjacent sand and pebbles etc looked to be their normal color, so . . . one of life's mysteries I guess. Thanks Au Seeker!

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I grew up in Searles Valley, east of Ridgecrest and the sidewinders were plentiful...Worst thing about them is the bury themselves in the sand completely except for their heads and when you get near them they get agitated and their tail pops up, but they are darn near invisible ... Can't tell you the times I stood with one leg in the air, mid-step, trying to find the darn snake ... The low bushes echo the sound of the rattling so you can't always get a good idea of where it actually is... 1' away? 10' away? ... Can be un-nerving. ... Cheers, Unc

 

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